Razer Naga Trinity mouse and Tartarus V2 keypad are ready for action

I have a sickness, and the only cure is more mouse buttons. My current mouse is a SteelSeries Rival 500, and before that I was rocking a Corsair Vengeance M95. Like many gamers, though, my first many-buttoned mouse was a Razer Naga. Razer's MMO-oriented mouse has been through a few revisions: the Naga Hex had fewer buttons, and the Naga Chroma variants carried RGB LED illumination. The company is revisiting the concept yet again, and this time calls it the Naga Trinity. Alongside the new rodent, the company also has second edition of the Tartarus gaming keypad.

The "Trinity" in the mouse's name refers to its ability to please fans of every Naga model. The mouse comes with three interchangeable left side panels that offer either the twelve-button grid of the original Naga, the seven-button circular arrangement of the Naga Hex V2, or a simple two-button formation like you'd find on most regular mice. The Naga Trinity has five programmable buttons besides whatever panel you attach to the side, so you can end up with a total of 19 programmable functions.

Razer's upgraded the sensor in the Naga Trinity, too. Based on the 16,000-DPI maximum resolution that Razer trumpets, we expect it's a close relative of other sensors based on the PixArt PMW3360 design, like Roccat's Owl-Eye or the sensor in my own Rival 500. That's not a complaint by any means, as the PMW3360 and its derivatives are on top of the mouse-sensor world right now.

The Naga Trinity's partner is the Tartarus V2 gaming keypad. This is essentially the equivalent of a gamepad for mouse-and-keyboard gamers. It has 19 fully programmable keys, and under each one rests a Razer "Mecha-Membrane" keyswitch. I've had the opportunity recently to try out just such a switch and it left a more favorable impression on me than you might expect, so don't sneer too hard at the idea if you haven't given these switches a go. The Tartarus V2 has an 8-way directional pad for the user's thumb, as well as a scroll wheel under the user's index finger. Altogether, the keypad has 32 programmable functions.

Razer says the Naga Trinity is priced at $100 (or 120€ in Europe) and will be available soon on its website and in stores early next year. The Tartarus V2 keypad is already available in the Razer web shop for $80 (90€ in Europe).

Comments closed
    • iBend
    • 2 years ago

    Finally, it’s time to replace my ancient nostromo
    Skipped tartarus and orbweaver because both didn’t have scroll whell, and because my nostromo still work fine, but it’s been 5 years now, time to replace it 😀

    (I don’t use it for gaming, I use with wacom cintiq)

    • christos_thski
    • 2 years ago

    We need more wireless mechanical gaming keyboards, now that Logitech has shown it can be done efficiently (if there was ever any doubt). If I’m paying upwards of 100 for a keyboard, it better have a wireless option.

    • Khali
    • 2 years ago

    I own a Razer Black Widow keyboard and I will never buy another Razer product simply because of the requirement to log in, online, to change keyboard settings or set up a macro key. This is a ridiculous requirement for a piece of hardware.

      • bill94el
      • 2 years ago

      I have exact sentiments…if you like this style mouse just do yourself a favor and try the Nyth.
      [url<]https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16826436041&cm_re=roccat_nyth-_-26-436-041-_-Product[/url<]

        • Khali
        • 2 years ago

        Thanks for the tip but I don’t use mice at all. I have an old injury that makes moving my wrist around hurt over time so I use Trackballs exclusively now. I just picked up the The Elecom EX-G and love it. Very nice alternative to the Logitech MX series Trackballs.

        Another instance where a TR review let me know about a piece of hardware I probably would not have known about. [url<]https://techreport.com/review/32629/logitech-mx-ergo-trackball-reviewed[/url<]

      • CityEater
      • 2 years ago

      I couldn’t agree more. I have a Razer mouse and keyboard and block the app from updating to the newer version they introduced which required a login. Its pretty gross they try and justify it by saying “online profile, use anywhere”. Totally pointless.

      Won’t buy Razer again even though they make decent gear.

      NZXT are guilty of the same thing with their CAM software. How do they both justify it internally???

      • YukaKun
      • 2 years ago

      I think you’re incorrect there.

      I have a Razer Orbweaver and an Orochi for the mouse. You only need to go online to download your devices profiles when you switch computers. I do that a lot with my notebook, so I can live with having the login thingy, since it actually provides usefulness.

      Also, it is not a requirement. Once I download the profile, I put the software in “offline mode” and it has never ever gone online on its own. I even monitor it to make sure it’s not using any internet and it never has.

      And yes, I’m talking about Synapse.

      Cheers!

        • thedosbox
        • 2 years ago

        No, Khali is correct. You *have* to login before you can even configure your device. Even worse, your windows account has to have administrator privileges in order for you to login to synapse.

          • Ryu Connor
          • 2 years ago

          YukaKun is correct.

          Synapse works on Standard User Account without issue. There are no UAC prompts or need for Administrator privileges to run or use Synapse. You need Admin to install, but that’s not unusual.

          You only have to login once in online mode. At that point you can set the software to offline mode and never have it go online again. Your devices can be fully configured in offline mode.

          I’ve never seen a version of Synapse that works the way you guys describe, but I also don’t believe you’re lying. So I’m gonna guess these were issues with Synapse when it first debuted with online functionality years upon years ago.

          All the complaints in this thread have been addressed. The only valid complaint is needing an account for the software. You guys had better buckle up on that particular feature, cause it’s only going to become more common with all software as time passes.

            • thedosbox
            • 2 years ago

            [quote<] I've never seen a version of Synapse that works the way you guys describe, but I also don't believe you're lying. So I'm gonna guess these were issues with Synapse when it first debuted with online functionality years upon years ago. [/quote<] Nope, this was with v2.20.17.413 as of three months ago. One correction though - it would let you "login" as a standard user, but the checkbox to remember your razer ID would have no effect unless you were an administrator. Thus requiring you to login again every time you logged into windows. I have no problem with them *offering* a cloud account for those who want to use it, but being forced to have one is why I would never recommend another Razer product.

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      I wonder what proportion of people who have bought a Razer product will every buy another Razer product?

      I had an original Boomslang (with ball!) and it was a good mouse so I had no problems buying an original Deathadder, which was a defective-by-design product that disintegrated even with careful use and the third RMA went on ebay, unopened.

      After messing about with Logitech mice that were unable to provide 1:1 tracking, I decided to give the new 2013 Deathadder another try. I heard that the build quality had improved so that the buttons didn’t ‘crash’ into the wheel, locking it and middle-clicking at the same time, and that the soft-touch coating didn’t flake off if you touched it with your fingers. I returned it within the 28-day returns period because the software was horrendous. There’s no way I’d wish Razer software on anyone, even if they were given the mouse for free. To [i<]pay[/i<] for Razer software seems like an exercise in masochism....

        • MOSFET
        • 2 years ago

        I have Razer mouse that works very well and is very comfortable for my hand. It has no Razer software installed – it works just fine as a standard HID device. I don’t even want extra mouse buttons – I go out of my way to find 2 button with scroll wheel. Those are usually just uncomfortable, so I ended up with a Razer mouse.

      • meerkt
      • 2 years ago

      It’s not so bad. They just want telemetry to verify that each keypress works according to spec.

    • Turd-Monkey
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]I have a sickness, and the only cure is more...[/quote<] [quote<]mouse buttons[/quote<] ...whew, thought you were going to say RGB LEDs.

      • morphine
      • 2 years ago

      Dear sir, I’m afraid that Mr. Killian is [i<]also[/i<] a person of that particular persuasion.

      • Cuhulin
      • 2 years ago

      RGB-LED attraction is not a sickness.

      Let there be light!

    • Voldenuit
    • 2 years ago

    Why not go full D-pad? I could see 8-directional controls being very useful for, say, selecting weapns and powers, and while the octa-partite circular button arrangement above accomplishes the same thing, it might be a lot quicker to use an actual d-pad.

      • Pville_Piper
      • 2 years ago

      I had the N52te for several years and now the Orbweaver… Console game pads suck wind and these units allow you to set up the controls for every game the same way. For FPS shooters they are great and no deaths because you hit the wrong key.

      Back when I bought the N52te I was getting very frustrated with using a keyboard and decided to give it a try. I would never turn back. And best of all, no stinking windows key.

        • thedosbox
        • 2 years ago

        Yep, v1 Tartarus user here, and programmability is why I continue to use razer’s otherwise terrible software.

        Given the v2 appears to be RGB-LED infested, it might be time to buy another v1 as backup.

        BTW, do the v2 links work for anyone else? I get a page not found error, despite the raw HTML showing lots of CSS and javascript.

          • RAGEPRO
          • 2 years ago

          Razer’s pages were down at the time of publication. They should be up now.

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