ROG Swift PG27VQ is the first gaming monitor with Aura Sync

Thanks to its single-vendor nature, you might reasonably expect G-Sync to have limited appeal. That's not really the case, though. GeForce gamers are spoiled for choice, and there are displays in almost every common shape and size available packing Nvidia's variable-refresh-rate technology. Unfortunately, high-refresh-rate monitors in 3840×2160 resolution still haven't shown up in stores yet, so G-Sync fans can pick up the next best thing: a display like the ROG Swift PG27VQ.

Asus' new monitor is more-or-less a curved version of the ROG Swift PG278QR. That means it's a 27" display in 2560×1440 resolution with a maximum refresh rate of 165 Hz. As mentioned above, it supports G-Sync, and that means it also supports Nvidia's Ultra Low Motion Blur (ULMB) feature. Even in ULMB mode, the monitor should have a nice bright picture thanks to its maximum 400 cd/m² brightness. The PG27VQ's screen is curved in the popular 1800R curvature.

Asus says that the PG27VQ's maximum contrast ratio is 1000:1 and gives its color reproduction as 72% of the NTSC color space, or roughly 100% of the sRGB colorspace. The company also claims the PG27VQ has a 1-ms response time, and rates it for viewing within 170° horizontal or 160° vertical angles. None of those specifications are surprising given the display's TN panel, and the take-away is that this monitor will be awesome for fast action games.

We actually first heard about the ROG PG27VQ way back in April, but back then it had a quantum dot backlight and HDR capabilities. Those specs seem to have unfortunately vanished from the PG27VQ's spec sheet. At least the monitor is festooned with RGB LEDs. Asus says the PG27VQ is the first monitor whose rainbow lighting can be controlled with Aura Sync.

The ROG Swift PV27VQ is showing up on Newegg for $800, although we believe that's just preliminary pricing, as the listing currently shows as out of stock. We expect the monitor will be coming in stock before long, so keep an eye out.

Comments closed
    • samhain1969
    • 2 years ago

    The PG27VQ”R” variant will be carrying the Q-Dot tech and perhaps HDR support. Most April 17′ Asus and tech site literature did not make mention of HDR for the PG27VQ BUT none of these same reports mentioned the PG27VQR either.

    The yet to debut PG27UQ will definitely be sporting Q-Dot, have the innards for HDR support, a 4K rez and @144Hz.

    • floodo1
    • 2 years ago

    Gsync is appealing because many of the monitors featuring it have higher refresh rates than their FreeSync counterparts and many Gsync monitors have ULMB as well.

    • Kretschmer
    • 2 years ago

    Oh man, I thought “Aura Sync” was a monitor that supported GSync and FreeSync with one SKU.

    Instead, it’s RGB LEDs.

    Well, consider my soul shattered.

      • jessterman21
      • 2 years ago

      OMG me too

    • Anovoca
    • 2 years ago

    For being the part of the computer you look at, this isn’t very pleasant to look at.

    • mjallan123
    • 2 years ago

    I got a PG279Q 2 years ago for less money. It has the the same 165Hz refresh, G-Sync and 1440p resolution but it’s IPS and without a ridiculous curve.

    Why on earth would you release a more expensive monitor that is worse than a product you shipped 2 years ago?

      • DoomGuy64
      • 2 years ago

      Why? Because they can. Nvidia knows their userbase will pay for it, because they locked in the market and brainwashed their customers into being Apple-like fanboys. The price gouging started with the X-80 cards being full price for mid range hardware, and the high end cards selling as $1k Titan products. We let them get away with that, so it stretched into monitors. There’s no telling how much worse it will get, because there hasn’t been any major pushback since the beginning.

      The truth is out there with the data and prices, yet Nvidia users continue to fund their own walled garden with Apple-like fervor. At some point it will get too toxic for value conscious consumers to support these business practices, but it hasn’t been reached yet, and Nvidia knows they can further squeeze the market. Meanwhile, Freesync is half the cost, GCN 1 – 1.1 outlasted Kepler, and Maxwell is starting to hit it’s planned obsolescence hardware limitations.

      Maybe this $800 2K TN panel is the straw that breaks the camel’s back? I’d like to think people are wising up to the con job, but that would require breaking the conditioning of the Stockholm syndrome walled garden, or at least making smarter purchases, both of which require too much effort for cash flush PCMR snobbists, and hey it’s got RGB LED’s! So, maybe, or maybe not. Hopefully this will motivate at least a few people to double think staying in Nvidia’s walled garden ecosystem.

    • DoomGuy64
    • 2 years ago

    I got my Asus MG279 at around half that, and it’s IPS. lol. Gonna take my savings and buy a Vega 56 now.

    • brucethemoose
    • 2 years ago

    Really?

    I want the RGB LEDs INSIDE the monitor, not outside…

    • GrimDanfango
    • 2 years ago

    As ever – don’t earnestly repeat nonsense marketing terms like “Aura Sync” without at least some highly snark-infused quote-marks. You’re just encouraging them!!

      • Freon
      • 2 years ago

      They’re paid to post this, it’s not editorial content.

    • DeadOfKnight
    • 2 years ago

    When did RGB-lit monitors stop being a joke?

      • meerkt
      • 2 years ago

      Then their stand’s RGB LEDs started supporting HDR and using QDs.

      • K-L-Waster
      • 2 years ago

      Did they stop being a joke?

    • TwoEars
    • 2 years ago

    Still waiting for the PG35VQ, seems they’re having some delays.

      • ljaszcza
      • 2 years ago

      Yeah, me too, panel production issues I hear. Q1 or Q2 of 2018 was the latest word. The specs so far look just great though.

    • Voldenuit
    • 2 years ago

    Too pricey.

    I have a ROG Swift PG278Q which I got refurb several years ago for $440, and while I love it, I would not spend more than $500 for it or a similar G-sync monitor.

      • Helmore
      • 2 years ago

      Isn’t the main complaint behind G-Sync that most of the supporting monitors are too pricey? Besides the fact that it’s not an open standard of course.

        • Voldenuit
        • 2 years ago

        It’s certainly been an ongoing problem.

        Back when AMD had no competition in the upper midrange space (970, 980, 1070, 1080), nvidia was the only place to go if you wanted high refresh 1440p gaming. But with Vega, that is no longer true (at least, assuming prices ever return to sane levels from crypto-mining).

        I was hoping to see sanity in G-sync monitor prices as a result. Alas, no such luck, I guess.

          • NoOne ButMe
          • 2 years ago

          Vega 56 is now buyable at around $400.

          And that is the Vega card that makes sense right now.

          $1000-1100 build before display with 6C+ with Ryzen or Intel and Vega 56 is now viable with no part reuse.

          actually, wow, surprisingly pricing in the 1440p 100Hz+ display market is only a tiny premium for Gsync ($25-75) which for a $1500 purchase is nearly nothing.

          Kudos for Gsync scaler costs going down, or rage for manufacturers turning up the margin on the Freesync displays. Or maybe a bit of both πŸ™‚

            • JustAnEngineer
            • 2 years ago

            Radeon RX Vega cards are now available at MSRP (or even a smidgeon below MSRP) from Newegg. Monitors with NVidia’s proprietary G-Sync still command a significant price premium over similar monitors with FreeSync.
            [url<]https://techreport.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=1366797#p1366592[/url<]

            • NoOne ButMe
            • 2 years ago

            ah, yes, i forget to look at IPS monitors only πŸ™‚

            But if fast refresh rate and *Sync is your goal, for 144p prices are about equal.

            But for a NEW build, the $1600 w/ Gsync versus $1500 with Freesync still isn’t a huge difference.

            I remember it being more.

          • cmrcmk
          • 2 years ago

          I’m still hoping that nVidia will get on the FreeSync bandwagon eventually. If Intel will buy in, Adaptive Sync might become table stakes for monitor makers and that will start the countdown for nVidia to support it, even if it’s just as a “lesser” implementation of their flagship G-Sync. Maybe 5 years from now?

          • floodo1
          • 2 years ago

          It’s because the high end gaming monitor market is very small

      • morphine
      • 2 years ago

      Please note that the price is almost certainly just a placeholder.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This