Cryorig Taku desktop case rises from the Kickstarter ashes

Cryorig first showed its Taku Mini-ITX case-slash-monitor-stand all the way back during Computex 2016 and sought feedback from the marketplace with a Kickstarter campaign early last summer. The Kickstarter didn't reach its funding goal, but Cryorig and its manufacturing partner Lian Li are going ahead and building the chassis anyway.

As one might expect from a case developed in conjunction with the aluminum aficionados at Lian Li, the Taku's exterior is covered with the lightweight metal.  The legs that hold the machine up are made from solid wood with a light finish, and the Taku sits high enough to store a keyboard and a mouse underneath. The only adornment on the front of the case is a round power button that does double duty as a status indicator. The system within slides out the front on a rail-mounted tray. The side of the case has a pair of USB 3.0 ports and audio jacks, and the top has a little notch to tuck a phone charger cord inside the system.

The Taku measures 5.6" tall, 22.4" wide, and 12.2" deep (14.2 cm x 57 cm x 31 cm) and weighs 11.7 lbs (5.3 kg). Cryorig says that buyers can safely load the top of the machine with up to 33 lbs (15 kg) of monitors or other desktop doo-dads. The Taku's squat dimensions still permit the installation of a high-end graphics card thanks to the included riser. The case has a two-chambered design that separates the motherboard from the power supply (in SFX or SFX-L sizes), hard drives, and graphics card.

Graphics card size is limited to 11.0" (28 cm) length and 1.57" thickness, so buyers shopping for units with bulky two-and-a-half-slot coolers will need to check specs before buying. The maximum height for the CPU cooler is more limiting, at a scant 1.9" (4.8 cm). Builders can cram one 3.5" spinny drive and a pair of 2.5" storage devices into a system in addition to whatever M.2 drives are attached to the motherboard. Even the memory has a height restriction at 2.0" (5.2 cm).

Interested gerbils can pre-order the Taku Mini-ITX chassis at Newegg for $300. Cryorig expects cases to start shipping on December 5. Kickstarter backers who pre-order the Taku through Cryorig are guaranteed to receive their case before the end of December and will also get a free Cryorig C7 compact cooler as part of the deal.

Comments closed
    • Kalgash
    • 2 years ago

    Any mention of Canadian availability?

      • UndrState
      • 2 years ago

      This ( thanks for asking )

    • Tumbleweed
    • 2 years ago

    The 1980s called, and they want their Amiga 1000 back.

    • Airmantharp
    • 2 years ago

    This case is calling me…

    Dunno what I’d put in it, apparently Ryzen CPU’s are pretty cheap even though 8-series Intel CPUs aren’t available- but holy crap those RAM prices, even worse for AMD!

    • ludi
    • 2 years ago

    Needs to be piano black with at an annodized front panel and mahogany-red finish for the wood bits. At $300 and paired with standard black/silver desktop accessories, a white powdercoat doesn’t do the job.

    • albundy
    • 2 years ago

    dell keyboard and mouse?

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    For those saying the cost is way too high, you are right – but this is likely a limited-production run that has to cover its own tooling costs.

    Take similar projects like the NCase M1, it’s a piece of mITX genius and it’s fairly simple in terms of manufacturing, but owing to the small-scale batch production and it’s product stack of one, there are no economies of scale. It’s cost is 2-3x higher than you’d expect for a mainstream product and here’s why:

    Mainstream products share a common platform with other products. Companies like Corsair will take a basic chassis (like the 200R) and then produce half a dozen variants by changing only a single panel, paint colour, or drive cage. The tooling costs and the design costs are absorbed by a whole family of products, whilst the larger number of products serving different target demographics totals far more than a single product like this Cryorig or the NCase.

    In short, Even with manufacturing experts Lian-Li and their facilities on tap, the absence of economies of scale and single-product tooling makes this very expensive, relative to what we’re used to for mass-produces, large-scale, shared tooling product families. Nobody is being greedy, that’s just what this costs if you want an isolated single product to [i<]not[/i<] make a financial loss.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 2 years ago

    It’s made from aluminum, and they want me to use it as an old-school desktop PC monitor stand. Right.

    Yes LCD monitors are lighter than CRTs, but no. Just…no.

      • TheRazorsEdge
      • 2 years ago

      I have a 30-inch LCD that’s under the weight limit.

      This would get some heavy consideration if I hadn’t just replaced my desk and upgraded into the NCASE M1.

      This case, the M1, and the DAN A4-SFX are the top three if you want both small size and space for high-performance components.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 2 years ago

        In the weight limit or not there’s just no way. Not for me anyway

          • TheRazorsEdge
          • 2 years ago

          Dell and HP both have made laptop docking stations out of plastic that are meant to support a monitor on top and mate with the laptop underneath.

          Plastic, aluminum, and wood are all easily capable of supporting the <50 lb load of modern monitors. Hell, we have shelving units with metal frames and particle board shelves that are rated for 500+ lbs per shelf.

          Things can be sturdy enough for a job without being stainless steel.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 2 years ago

            Great! Thanks for this new information!

      • EzioAs
      • 2 years ago

      Imagine what would happen if a cat would jump on the monitor.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 2 years ago

        Cats are evil

    • Wildchild
    • 2 years ago

    I’m sorry, but nothing about that case warrants it costing three hundred freaking dollars.

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 2 years ago

    I like it, just not for $300. That’s not uncommon for Lain Li, though.

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