Intel readies a family of 5G modems and talks up a storm on 28 GHz

5G networking promises to connect everyone and everything, and Intel doesn't want to be left out of the potentially huge wave of handsets and smart devices that will take advantage of the next generation of wireless connectivity. Today, the company announced the XMM 8000 series of 5G modems, of which the XMM 8060 is the first member.

The nascent 5G New Radio, or 5G NR, standards are labyrinthe and cover multiple phases of next-generation wireless deployment. While we're still coming to grips with the full details of 5G, it's clear that the XMM 8060 will support both the intermediate 5G NR Non-Standalone networking (a deployment phase that will piggyback on some LTE technologies and networks), as well as the full-fat 5G NR Standalone networks that Intel (and Qualcomm) expect will begin rolling out in 2020. The XMM 8060 will also be backwards-compatible with 2G, 3G, and 4G networks. Intel expects that the XMM 8060 will begin shipping as part of 5G-ready devices in mid-2019.

While the XMM 8060 is in the oven, Intel is still researching and learning about 5G networking with a prototype device it calls the Intel 5G Modem. The company says this early silicon is now making "full end-to-end" calls over the 28 GHz band, a frequency that Qualcomm calls mmWave. Intel's achievement comes on the heels of similar news from Qualcomm earlier this year.

As 5G condenses, Intel is continuing to develop new modems for the LTE networks of today. The company capped off its cellular announcements with news of the XMM 7660 modem, a Category-19-capable device that Intel says will support speeds of up to 1.6 gigabits per second. That support means the XMM 7660 is ready to handle future tiers of Gigabit LTE, and Intel bolsters that capability with multiple-input and multiple-output support, carrier aggregation, and a "broad range" of band compatibility. The company says the XMM 7660 will begin shipping in devices in 2019.

Comments closed
    • tacitust
    • 2 years ago

    According to the conspiracy theorists “in the know” 5G is just the latest and greatest “slow kill” plot by the New World Order — i.e. to give everyone brain cancer and depopulate the planet, allowing them to enslave the surviving few million and live like gods forever (after unveiling the life-extension technology they have already developed).

    By the way, if you this theory might have some serious flaws to it, then you’re doing it wrong — at least, that’s what they keep telling me…

      • Growler
      • 2 years ago

      [fnord]This is preposterous! Just because we’re lizard people…I mean, just because we’re normal human beings doesn’t mean that we want to cull the population and enslave the rest![/fnord]

    • Kretschmer
    • 2 years ago

    Currently, I’m more limited by network coverage than peak download speeds on my mobile phone. Will 28Ghz offer better penetration?

    As an aside, gigabit LTE would be hilarious if I ended up using all my full-speed monthly bandwidth in seconds.

      • cygnus1
      • 2 years ago

      No, generally the rule of thumb is, the higher the frequency/lower the wavelength, the less penetration of solid materials the signal will have.

    • adisor19
    • 2 years ago

    Apple is rubbing their hands and Qualcomm is probably thinking of selling out to Broadcom’s next offer.

    Adi

      • willmore
      • 2 years ago

      [url<]https://goo.gl/images/oMGE27[/url<]

      • blastdoor
      • 2 years ago

      According to [url<]https://www.fastcompany.com/40497639/source-apple-is-looking-to-intel-to-power-super-fast-5g-iphone[/url<] Apple might end up integrating an Intel 5G modem in their SOC and fab the SOC at Intel fabs. I actually find that highly believable.

        • tsk
        • 2 years ago

        Yes this is definitely in the cards.

          • blastdoor
          • 2 years ago

          It will be bad news for TSMC. Their best hope might be that the X versions of SOCs keep the modem separate.

            • adisor19
            • 2 years ago

            TSMC has plenty of customers and while none of them are as big as Apple, they won’t suffer too much.

            Adi

            • blastdoor
            • 2 years ago

            Maybe…. but who else is willing to pay for cutting edge fab tech the way Apple is?

            TSMC has been narrowing the gap with Intel. The A11 is fabbed on TSMC 10nm which I’m inferring is approximately equivalent to Intel 14nm. If TSMC is really able to get their 7nm out next year, and if that’s approximately equivalent to Intel 10nm, then that’s it — foundries will have caught up to Intel.

            Take away the Apple $$ and I’ll hazard a guess that TSMC’s schedule would be delayed by a at least a year, maybe more.

            Which perhaps sheds some light on what kind of deal Intel might end up giving Apple to fab a 5G fully integrated SOC. Perhaps Intel execs are privately flipping out over the possibility that the foundries are on the verge of catching them. Perhaps they have visions of AMD following Apple 6 months later on the same fab tech. So perhaps Intel is giving Apple one hell of a sweetheart deal to fab a 5G SOC for them.

            • tsk
            • 2 years ago

            Actually seems like Intels 10nm is going to be quite a bit denser than TSMC 7nm from what I’ve heard through the grapevine.

    • willmore
    • 2 years ago

    mmWave? Okay. I guess you can call it mmWave. I would call it cm wave as 28GHz has a wavelength of 1.07cm. If it were over 30GHz, then it would be sub-cm wave, but you’d need to be up around 100GHz to be mm wave. That’s 3mm wavelength.

    If anyone cares, the split isn’t at 5 because these things are generally though of in log scale, not linear.

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      I like to think that the 28MHz 10m band is millimeter-wave too.

      It’s just that it’s 10,000 mm.

      • Neutronbeam
      • 2 years ago

      mmWave was the second choice. The first choice was mmmmmWave–’cause it’s tasty.

      • UberGerbil
      • 2 years ago

      Wait until they’re measuring it using Millions of Binary Operations per second.

      mmmBop

        • UberGerbil
        • 2 years ago

        Wow, downvotes? All the bad puns on this site, and this is the one that gets downvoted? C’mon, secretly you love it — search your feelings, [url=https://youtu.be/iEejfq1KhkU<]you know it to be true[/url<].

          • willmore
          • 2 years ago

          Someone is downvoting this whole post. Everyone’s getting hit from some reason. Maybe some Qualcomm fanboy?

      • nico1982
      • 2 years ago

      Eh, unfortunately nemmWave (not exactly millimiter wave) or ammW (almost millimiter Wave) are not as catchy as mmWave.

      • Wirko
      • 2 years ago

      Fun facts: microwave is hardly “micro” , and 21:9 isn’t 21:9, either.

      Now waiting for someone to define the millimeter as 1/1024 of a meter.

        • willmore
        • 2 years ago

        I pointed out that 21:9 wasn’t 21:9 in an earlier post.

        And 1/1024 of a meter is already a mibimeter. No need to reinvent.

    • SuperPanda
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<] calls over the 28 GHz band, a frequency that [s<]Qualcomm calls mmWave[/s<] physics calls mm wavelengths [/quote<] 3x10^8 (m/s) / 28x10^9 Hz = 10mm. /pedant

      • Topinio
      • 2 years ago

      Yeah, and 900 Mhz GSM is mm wavelengths too, about 333 mm.
      (299792458./(900*10**6))

      So’s longwave radio, it’s mm wavelengths amiright, all the mm, all of them, over a million mm folks.
      (299792458./(283*10**3))

      /[s<]lapsed physicist[/s<] numerate person.

    • gecko575
    • 2 years ago

    Those are some beautiful fingers.

      • Redocbew
      • 2 years ago

      They must be Master of their Domain.

      • Sahrin
      • 2 years ago

      But their terrifying blob of an owner in the background is not.

      • frogg
      • 2 years ago

      At least, it’s not Brian’s

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