Break records with EVGA’s GTX 1080 Ti Kingpin Hydro Copper Gaming

The Titan Xp is unquestionably the king of the consumer Pascal line-up, but Nvidia doesn't allow board partners to make custom versions of that card. Fortunately, the next step down is more like a lip than a stair. The GeForce GTX 1080 Ti is the fastest card to wear the GeForce name, and we expect that EVGA's GTX 1080 Ti Kingpin Hydro Copper Gaming will be among the fastest variants ever created. The card comes with a single-slot waterblock pre-installed, and EVGA guarantees that every sample is capable of whipping its GPU core clock up to 2025 MHz.

Of course, 2025 MHz is probably just the starting line for the sort of person likely to buy one of these cards. EVGA says the GTX 1080 Ti Hydro Copper Gaming has nine separate thermal sensors and dedicated points for measuring various voltages. The card has a pair of 8-pin power connectors feeding a 10+3-phase voltage regulator. The most dedicated overclockers might be using exotic coolants poured in carefully-attached cups, but this card should make it easy for slightly-less-looney gamers to get right to the bleeding edge of its performance.

Although the GTX 1080 Ti Kingpin Hydro Copper is technically a single-slot card, it must be noted that the waterblock extends well above the back-panel bracket. Despite only taking up one slot, the Kingpin Hydro Copper doesn't sacrifice connectivity compared other GTX 1080 Tis. You still get a DVI-D output and a full-sized HDMI port, although the triple DisplayPort connectors had to shrink to Mini size. EVGA is already selling the GTX 1080 Ti Kingpin Hydro Copper Gaming at its website for $1250.

Comments closed
    • bronek
    • 2 years ago

    I love a high performance, single-slot GPU. There are so few of those …

    • phileasfogg
    • 2 years ago

    Kingpin Hydro Copper Gaming?
    Hmmm… come January 1, folks in California will be Tetra-Hydro-Cannabinol Gaming.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    Who is spending well over a thousand bucks on a halo product this close to a new generation of Halo products?

    TSMC’s confirmation that it’s ramping up volume production of Volta for next month indicates that it’ll be a January product and I’d put money on a paper launch or reveal at CES in early January.

      • MOSFET
      • 2 years ago

      But it’s so svelte 😉

    • Kougar
    • 2 years ago

    1/3rd again the price of a 1080 Ti Hydrocopper… definitely no longer feeling anymore buyer’s remorse. For potential buyers, even the 1080 Ti “SC2” hydro’s can reach 2050Mhz on stock voltage.

    I do wonder if the larger 10+3-phase VRM setup makes it less susceptible to coil whine issues though.

    • JosiahBradley
    • 2 years ago

    I get 2025Mhz on air with a 630$ reference card with three fans. The problem isn’t cooling or Pascal even it is nVidia’s asinine limits on how you can Overclock with voltage limits and power limits. These things hopefully have unlocked BIOS.

      • jihadjoe
      • 2 years ago

      Can’t blame Nvidia for setting those limits because that’s what they warranty the cards for. Partners are free to set higher limits if they want, but Nvidia won’t be paying for repairs if the card goes bust because of overly aggressive overclocking.

      • Airmantharp
      • 2 years ago

      My MSI 1080Ti SeaHawk (Corsair closed-loop version) does that speed, and it’s [i<][b<]silent[/b<][/i<] under load. I paid just a har over MSRP, so more than your reference card, and it rocks my socks.

    • Sargent Duck
    • 2 years ago

    DVI-D??

    But why? If you have the money for this card you already have some nice new monitors using HDMI/Display Port

      • JosiahBradley
      • 2 years ago

      Also if you can afford this card you can afford a DP -> DVI-D adapter that adds a few inches to the already long monitor cables.

        • nanoflower
        • 2 years ago

        My guess is there are some devices that may be used with this card (projectors?) that only support DVI. As for why not just go DP -> DVI-D, perhaps they are trying to capture people just looking for DVI-D options. While adapters would work I can see people just looking at cards with DVI-D first, before considering other options.

          • Chrispy_
          • 2 years ago

          You were close when you said “capture people”

          It’s about inline video capture via external devices. Displayport can be downgraded to DVI but it’s not the same thing as a native DVI-D port when you start injecting other devices into the physical chain.

        • jihadjoe
        • 2 years ago

        If you need long monitor cables to connect to a far away monitor or projector it’s better served using the HDMI port (up to 50 feet, vs 10 feet for DP). Much easier to convert to DVI-D too, because the lines carrying video are electrically identical.

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