Scythe Sengokubune has six heatpipes and an asymmetrical design

Custom liquid-cooling hardware and closed-loop AIOs get considerable attention from enthusiasts and cooling part makers. As efficient as a liquid-cooling system can be, though, air coolers are still tough to beat when it comes to simplicity and noise. Japanese outfit Scythe's latest Sengokubune is the newest model in the company's line of high-performance air coolers. Those hoping to fit one of these copper-and-aluminum sculptures into a tiny Mini-ITX build might want to keep in mind that the name refers to a boat (thanks, Zak).

The Sengokubune is built around six 6-mm copper heatpipes that transfer heat from the contact plate to an array of aluminum fins. The heat pipes aren't in direct contact with the CPU, but they're bent in a way to increase clearance for other system components like memory modules. The included 120-mm PWM fan has an oil bearing and rotates at speeds from 400 to 1500 RPM. Scythe says the spinner can generate 37.2 to 68.4 CFM of air movement.

The cooler measures 5.2" wide, 6.1" tall, and 3" deep (13 cm x 15.6 cm x 7.5 cm), so it should fit in most popular enthusiast cases. The hardware pack includes the bits and pieces to affix the coolers to any recent Intel desktop socket with 775 to 2066 pins, as well as recent AMD sockets including Ryzen's AM4. Threadripper's massive TR4 socket is not on the compatibility list.

The Sengokubune is currently only listed on the company's Japanese site and doesn't have a price tag, so interested gerbils might have to wait a little while or jump through some shipping and customs hoops. We'd expect the cooler to show up at Newegg's Scythe store soon enough, though.

Comments closed
    • Kraaketaer
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]Those hoping to fit one of these copper-and-aluminum sculptures into a tiny Mini-ITX build might want to keep in mind that the name refers to a boat[/quote<] I don't quite get the reference. Are boats generally that huge? Sure, cargo ships are enormous. In comparison, row boats are tiny - a far larger size span than full tower EATX to ITX in PC terms. Of course, even a tiny boat is far larger than an ITX PC - but it'd be far larger than an ATX PC too. So, is it a specific boat? A very large boat? If not, again, I don't get it. Then again, there are [url=https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811112533<]Mini-ITX boats[/url<].

      • auxy
      • 2 years ago

      The name is 千石船 pronounced せんごくぶね or se•n•go•ku•bu•ne. Say it with a Portuguese accent and no specific stress or intonation. It refers to a big ship for carrying 1000 koku of rice. One koku was supposed to be enough rice to feed a man for an entire year and weighed around 150kg.

      TMYK ☆(ゝω・)

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 2 years ago

        Thank you auxy. I missed your posts.

          • SomeOtherGeek
          • 2 years ago

          Same here…

        • moriz
        • 2 years ago

        千石船, if read as Chinese, means “thousand-rock(or stone) ship”.

        I guess one koku weighs about as much as a stone.

        • EzioAs
        • 2 years ago

        Why does fune turns into bune in this case though? I’ve seen hakobune and now sengokubune.

          • auxy
          • 2 years ago

          [url<]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rendaku[/url<]

            • EzioAs
            • 2 years ago

            Thanks. It’s nice to know what it’s actually called

        • Kretschmer
        • 2 years ago

        Wait, a useful auxy post? 2017, you scare me…

        • douglar
        • 2 years ago

        It might be pronounced せんごくぶね but it’s spelled Raymond Luxury Yach-t.

        • morphine
        • 2 years ago

        [quote<]Say it with a Portuguese accent[/quote<] sên-gó-cu-bu-né. Done. Still sounds Japanese.

          • Forge
          • 2 years ago

          Jesus, it’s very simple Japanese. They aggregate their words, just like German.

          Sen Goku Bune – Thousand stone boat.

          Don’t overthink it.

            • morphine
            • 2 years ago

            What does an anime character have to do with this?!

        • End User
        • 2 years ago

        Portuguese accent?

      • jihadjoe
      • 2 years ago

      They are Medium boats in Total War: Shogun 2

    • kmm
    • 2 years ago

    I guess this slots in between the Kotetsu (single stack tower 120 mm fan) and the Fuma (dual stack tower with two 120 mm fans). But the Kotetsu is already better than the Hyper 212 variants and maybe a bit over $30, while the Fuma is maybe the best cooler under $50. Or maybe it competes with the Fuma, considering the heft and design.

    I’m going to assume this can beat Noctua’s NH-U12S and others for best not-hugely-tall-so-will-fit-in-most-cases air cooler that doesn’t interfere with RAM slots.

    • JosiahBradley
    • 2 years ago

    Having used every single Scythe in the Ninja to Mugen line and having the original running right next to me after 7 years on a 6 core phenom, I only feel good vibes towards this new design. The fan is still spinning just fine and the thing runs nearly passively at idle.

    • Khali
    • 2 years ago

    All those fins bent at odd angles is going to play hob with getting any decent air flow through this thing. Looking at the side picture, it looks like the fins are bent to such an angle they touch the fin above. If its like that all the way through the entire radiator I bet you won’t get any air flow at all. I would like to see a test with this cooler just to see how bad it really is.

      • Waco
      • 2 years ago

      That’s a trick of perspective. The fins aren’t bent on the sides at all, they’re cut at opposing angles.

      • freebird
      • 2 years ago

      According to TechPowerup.com…

      “Each fin is a “shi ship”, which aids in airflow and smoother heat dissipation throughout the stack, while reducing turbulence.”

      Besides I doubt Scythe is in the habit of releasing a cooler that doesn’t cool.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    Scythe’s oil bearings have a habit of leaking, drying out and causing the fan to die.

    Sample size: 36
    Leaking bearings: 36
    Failure rate: 100%

      • JosiahBradley
      • 2 years ago

      I’ve got multiple Scythe fans running on for 5+ years and none have failed. Did you happen to buy all yours from one bad batch?

        • Takeshi7
        • 2 years ago

        I’ve had my Scythe Mugen 2 for almost 10 years and the fan is still working just as well as when it was brand new. Scythe makes really good quiet fans.

          • Chrispy_
          • 2 years ago

          People always say this and I ended up just replacing the fans.

          May have been a design fault with [url=http://www.scythe-eu.com/en/products/cpu-cooler/shuriken-rev-b.html<]this particular model[/url<] but [b<]all of them[/b<] (no exceptions) failed through leakage within a year or so in an air-conditioned room.

            • kmm
            • 2 years ago

            What was the fan orientation?

            Probably a bad design for that slim fan. The 12-15 mm thick fans are less common and tested.

            • Chrispy_
            • 2 years ago

            horizontal (pair of 36U rendering racks full of 2U chassis)

            • Takeshi7
            • 2 years ago

            sleeve bearing and fluid dynamic bearing fans don’t do very well horizontally. Use ball bearings in that scenario.

            • Chrispy_
            • 2 years ago

            I guess that’s the design flaw then; That sort of low-profile cooler is going to be mounted horizontally in the vast majority of scenarios!

            • HERETIC
            • 2 years ago

            Bit of a worry,through i’m sure some can last the distance.
            Most PSU manufacturers are now moving from ball bearing to sleeve/fluid.
            Probably pressure from the -must be quiet crowd…………………………..

            • kmm
            • 2 years ago

            Makes sense. The result is pretty disappointing but that’s kind of the nightmare scenario in terms of usage and orientation. The normal thickness Scythe fans, even the sleeve bearings, seem to do okay in vertical orientation for a lot of people for many years, though most are probably not running 24/7.

            • Spunjji
            • 2 years ago

            I have a 7-year-old specimen of that particular fan that was used daily and is still going well, by way of a counter-anecdote. However, its noise characteristics were always dire compared with standard thickness fans and/or the 120mm slim variant on the Big Shuriken.

      • Convert
      • 2 years ago

      I’ve never used Scythe myself, I always end up with Noctua it seems. But I did have a Noctua fan do something similar. I had used it for a while and then decommissioned a system and put the fan on its side in storage. I took it out a year later and it had oil all over the spindle. Pretty sure I put it back into production after cleaning it up though and it’s still running (I hope) somewhere haha.

    • Amien
    • 2 years ago

    That’s not a boat, its a battleship.

    • DPete27
    • 2 years ago

    Ooph that looks heavy.

      • thor84no
      • 2 years ago

      Yeah. I had a heavy heatsink like this once and it really was a big problem when moving the computer (for LAN parties). I used to have to reseat the CPU close to half the times I moved the computer, then I went water cooling instead and it’s *so* much better. I’m never getting one of these beasts again.

        • Bauxite
        • 2 years ago

        You had crappy mounts then, I’ve shipped big fat dual tower noctuas installed on boards multiple ways (air, truck, freight) with 0 issues. The ups/fedex dropkicking contest, I mean delivery service is definitely rougher than any car trunk across town. (random life advice: don’t write fragile on shipping boxes, it just means “kick me harder” – source: multiple drivers)

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This