Aorus GeForce GTX 1070 Ti muscles up its clock rates

GeForce GTX 1070 Ti cards all run pretty much the same clock rates out of the box. Whether this is due to a mandate from Nvidia or some other factor, we can't say for sure. Aorus' pragmatically-named GeForce GTX 1070 Ti 8G card is strikingly similar on the surface to its Gigabyte-branded cousin, but it boasts a higher 88-MHz overclock in its OC mode.

The bonus boost takes the card's spec'd boost clock to 1771 MHz—a 48 MHz improvement over the Gigabyte-branded model. Meanwhile, the spec'd boost clock of 1683 MHz for the reference design becomes the base clock for this card in OC mode. Users will have to enable that mode manually with Gigabyte's software, but it looks like doing so could provide a nice little push to the performance of their new pixel-painter. As always with Pascal-based cards, these default clock rates are merely indicative since the GPU will boost higher more often than not.

Unlike most Aorus-branded cards, this card has a standard output cluster consisting of three DisplayPorts, an HDMI connection, and a DVI plug. No VR-link ports here. The Aorus GTX 1070 Ti 8G card hasn't shown up at e-tail yet, but we'd expect it to run just a handful dollars more than the similar Gigabyte model that's currently available for $470 at Newegg.

Comments closed
    • tsk
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]Whether this is due to a mandate from Nvidia or some other factor, we can't say for sure.[/quote<] Does a bear poop in the woods?

      • mudcore
      • 2 years ago

      I wasn’t even aware there was speculation about the who on this. It’s clearly Nvidia. Now the why? I’ll speculate; its because Nvidia wants to change the business model and get rid of these board partners.

        • DPete27
        • 2 years ago

        Or maybe it’s because boost clock on Nvidia GPUs means almost nothing these days because of GPU Boost3.0. Most 1070Ti’s I’ve seen (including FE edition) reviewed are generally holding 1800MHz clock speeds during testing.

          • mudcore
          • 2 years ago

          What is your point? Of course they’re all going to end at the final boost speed. That’s the cap set in the firmware. If OEMs could they’d unlock that in a hurry. The GPU Boost isn’t maxing out what the card can do. It’s maxing out to the limit.

        • K-L-Waster
        • 2 years ago

        Why do a round about convoluted approach like that? If you want to cut out the board partners, just don’t sell chips to them. Job done.

        NVidia seems to attract weirder conspiracy theories than the Kennedy assassination…

          • mudcore
          • 2 years ago

          What’s convoluted about it?

          Nvidia wouldn’t make this switch instantly for a variety of reasons.

          – Did not have the logistics and supply chain in place to do this themselves at the necessary volume.
          – No in house or support partner to handle RMAs and tech support requires from customers, previously handled by partners.
          – Existing contracts with board partners that had to be fulfilled.

          There’s no way they’d make this switch in a singular generation. Likely not even two. It’s a long term shift but I’m fairly confident it will happen. It’s honestly hilarious to me you’d think this could be done like flipping a switch.

            • K-L-Waster
            • 2 years ago

            So instead their way of sidelining the add-in board makers is to restrict the clock speed of one specific model? That makes absolutely no sense — it wouldn’t even achieve the result you seem to think they’re after. They’d still have AIB partners, but the clock speeds of all the products would be close together. How on Earth would that sideline any of them?

            As for your other “points” (and I use the term very loosely…)

            – They’ve been making their own reference boards for years, so your first point was covered a long time ago. You may recall the complaints about the FE card pricing from 20 some odd months ago?

            – They wouldn’t be on the hook for RMA’s for previous boards sold by the AIB partners, so your second point isn’t even a point

            – Existing contracts wouldn’t automatically cover new products

            • mudcore
            • 2 years ago

            – What? Making a reference board isn’t the remotely the same as shipping out tens or hundreds of thousands of them. Logistics and supply is referring to gettting the product in retail partner and customer hands.

            – What? Who said they’d support previous releases? I am talking going forward for Nvidia sold products. Nvidia has gone from selling only to enterprise/corporate customers to selling massively to end users. This is a huge change. At minimum it must have required a major spin up of employees or a major deal with a third party tech support company.

            – Good lord. So your claim here is that none of the contracts would? Where did I say all? I didn’t. I mentioned it as a possibility. LMAO @ the idea these companies just work together generation to generation and their supply deals don’t go beyond that.

            Did you purposefully try not to understand my point? Your responses are bizarre.

            Further, this is just a combination of moves including the release of the Founder Edition products and now Nvidia even starting to sell special editions, diversifying their own line up.

            Nvidia has effectively eliminated one of the primary draws to buying an AIB card. It’s a clear move to consolidate the market.

            • mudcore
            • 2 years ago

            What happens when Nvidia starts offering “Founder Edition” or equivalent in both blower and down fire configurations and the cards have hard boost limits that a AIB can’t get past? AIBs have nothing compelling to offer end users. The end. Meanwhile Nvidia has built out their online store, their distribution partners, retail relationships, end users support, etc.

            This is so straightforward its hysterical to me people don’t see this. Lord knows the AIBs do. All their actions as of late indicate it. I feel for a company like EVGA. Hope they’re able to find enough stuff to rebrand to still keep it together.

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