Asus NovaGo is among the first Qualcomm Always Connected PCs

Qualcomm is holding its Technology Summit in Maui, Hawaii this week, and the company announced its complete vision for a new kind of mobile PC today: the "always-connected PC." We've heard bits and bytes about what a Qualcomm-powered Windows laptop might look like for some time now, but the company has unveiled its full vision for what those systems will be capable of today. Three of the basic tenets of these new PCs, developed in collaboration with Microsoft, are "instantly on," "always connected," and "better-than-all-day battery life." Asus CEO Jerry Shen presented the company's first implementation of the always-connected PC in the form of the NovaGo convertible.

The NovaGo is built around a Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 SoC and the company's X16 Gigabit LTE modem. Asus pairs those components with eSIM support for easy service-switching across national borders without physically swapping a SIM card, as well as nanoSIM support. With those components, the company claims that the NovaGo offers 22 hours of battery life and up to 30 days of standby, and it promises instant-on capability from sleep so that it's always ready to go. The concept of "modern standby" lets the NovaGo check for new emails and other notifications and allows it to sync files with the cloud while it's inactive, apparently without undue strain on battery life.

 

The NovaGo runs the Windows 10 S operating system atop 4 GB or 8 GB of RAM and 64 GB or 256 GB of UFS 2.0 flash storage. Its 13.3", 1920×1080 display offers Windows Ink pen support and claims to cover 178-degree viewing angles and 100% coverage of the sRGB color gamut. At three pounds (1.39 kg) and 0.6" (14.9 mm) thick, this convertible is barely there, too. The base model, with 4GB of RAM and 64 GB of storage, will run $599 when it hits stores, while the higher-end configuration with 8 GB of RAM and 256 GB of storage will run $799. Availability has yet to be determined.

Comments closed
    • davidbowser
    • 2 years ago

    Good – LTE eSIM or nanoSIM device in laptop form factor. There are relatively few laptops that come with the option.

    Not as good – Windows 10 S

    Bad – $600-$800 when you can get something like a comparable HP Spectre X2 running x86 Windows in the same price range. [url<]http://a.co/apsTAsa[/url<] Yes, the HP has a SIM slot.

    • Goty
    • 2 years ago

    I’m not really sure why I would buy this machine over an Asus built with a near-identical chassis and an 8th-gen i5 for about the same money (I forget the model name, but I played with one in Best Buy recently.) The only way I’d consider it is if the battery life claims hold up and the performance isn’t horrible, but I don’t have much faith in either.

    • Anovoca
    • 2 years ago

    Asus NovaGo……….A Novago……Anovago
    I see what you are trying to do here Asus but I’m still not biting.

    • yeeeeman
    • 2 years ago

    It depends much on performance and price. Also, Win32 app compatibility and general performance will be very important. We know already that WinRT was a failure so really Gigabit LTE is not enough to make it a must buy.
    Funny enough I must say that AMD with its Ryzen 2700U and Gigabit LTE might have better success, so kudos to them for seeing the opportunity.

    • Pancake
    • 2 years ago

    Make one of these with a 10″ screen and just take my money.

    • End User
    • 2 years ago

    Asus NoGo

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    Will x86 apps from the Windows store run on this?

      • Pancake
      • 2 years ago

      Yes. You can also get a full-fat Windows 10 and run regular Win32 x86 (but not x64) binaries.

    • DreadCthulhu
    • 2 years ago

    Everyone ready for Windows RT 2.0? I am SO Excited!

    • xeridea
    • 2 years ago

    I would rather have a real laptop with a real CPU. I don’t need to have it check email every 5 minutes, Gmail interface already does. This is nothing more than a fancy tablet with a keyboard, good for checking email and Facebook. A laptop with an SSD is basically instant on anyway. My brain isn’t addicted to getting updates and notifications every 3 minutes, so this is of no use to me. I would rather have a real laptop, and I would rather have it thicker anyway, thin laptops are silly toys with minimal use.

    • Neutronbeam
    • 2 years ago

    So in Spanish “No va” (not going) combined with Go for “Not going Go”. Seems a bit of a mixed message.

      • jihadjoe
      • 2 years ago

      If we shift capitalization and emphasis a little bit (remember those how to pronounce ASUS jokes?) it can be Mexican for NoVago, or ‘not a wastrel/bum’. Kinda fits coz it’s always doing something, and ‘vago’ is a bum who does nothing.

    • odizzido
    • 2 years ago

    I am interested in this sort of system. I wonder how well x86 works? Any chance of a review?

      • HERETIC
      • 2 years ago

      This from AT-
      The OS will be Windows 10 S. This runs a version of Windows that relies mostly on the Store for the main applications but the system does perform binary translation (or similar) for 32-bit x86 applications. 64-bit x86 apps are a no-go.

      I’m trying to figure out-Who these are aimed at?
      Chromebooks and 2500U and 8250U are better products and generally cheaper.
      Perhaps a fishing exercise to see how many “stupids”are out there………………

        • Anovoca
        • 2 years ago

        Chromebooks aren’t exactly that big in the corporate sector. Put Office 365 and Citrix receiver on this and you have the perfect little machine for anyone who spends a lot of weekends On-Call for their jobs. Since there are plenty of companies that don’t reimburse you for your data usage if you have to tether or hotspot with your own personal phone in order to take an off hours call, an always connected work machine would be fantastic.

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