Stuff your biggest graphics card in PowerColor’s Gaming Station

A while back, we glanced at PowerColor's Devil Box external video card enclosure. It takes virtually any graphics card you want to throw in it short of a Radeon Pro Duo, and then wires up said card to a PC using Thunderbolt 3. If you liked the feature set of the Devil Box but were put off by its edgy styling, take a look at PowerColor's newest external GPU enclosure: the Gaming Station.

The Gaming Station is a very slight upgrade from the Devil Box. Its power supply is 80 Plus Gold certified and slightly beefier at 550 W. PowerColor certifies the box as capable of containing graphics cards as potent and power-thirsty as the Radeon R9 290X, the GeForce GTX Titan Xp, and the mighty Quadro GP100. The Station does trade the USB 3.0 Type-C port of the Devil Box for another Type-A port—thus totaling five USB 3.0 Type-A ports—but that's probably more useful anyway.

PowerColor hasn't announced a price or availability details for the Gaming Station, but we wouldn't expect it to be cheaper than the Devil Box. Given the similar feature set, you may want to just pick up the earlier model—Newegg currently has it marked down to just $300 before a $50 mail-in rebate. If you're on the fence about external graphics card boxes, our man Jeff is working up an analysis of the technology as it stands now and hopefully will have it prepared for your perusal soon.

Comments closed
    • ET3D
    • 2 years ago

    I really don’t want to stuff my biggest graphics card in an external box. I want to stuff a small, good enough card in a small, cheap external box, because it will still be miles better than the integrated graphics in my ultrabook, and it might be halfway transportable, unlike this monstrosity.

    • Kretschmer
    • 2 years ago

    This is the kind of thing I could see myself getting if (1) these solutions didn’t carry a huge performance hit and (2) they didn’t mar the finish with a giant “GAMINGSTATION” logo.

    (1) [url<]https://www.notebookcheck.net/Razer-Core-Benchmarks-Analysis-and-Compatibility-Is-it-Worth-it.213526.0.html[/url<] In benchmarks, a TB3 1080Ti just takes a huge hit to performance. And the higher your FPS the bigger the delta is.

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    I still think these are overpriced. Yes there’s probably little economies of scale to bring the price down but still.. 3 Benjamins for what’s essentially just a box with a PCIe slot and some cables is still a bit hard on the wallet.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 2 years ago

      You’re not giving them nearly enough credit. Thunderbolt is a complex system, not just PCIe-on-a-wire. There’s a whole controller in there that also has its own USB 3.0 host and Gigabit Ethernet controller as well as the 80 PLUS Gold 550W SFX power supply.

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    Guys do you suppose [url=http://i.imgur.com/v7loIkF.jpg<]this[/url<] will fit in there?

    • derFunkenstein
    • 2 years ago

    I know it’s been said before about other eGPU solutions, but this is bigger than lots of mini ITX enclosures.

    The price is OK, I guess, considering the extra functionality of a USB hub and Ethernet, which makes it a one-plug docking station. The specs page linked in the first paragraph says it delivers 87W, so that should be sufficient for most eGPU-capable laptops.

    • JosiahBradley
    • 2 years ago

    Every card but my 1080 Ti at 330mm.

    [quote<]Max Dimensions: 310 x 157 x 46mm [/quote<]

    • nico1982
    • 2 years ago

    Those “graphics” on the front are really bad.

      • Voldenuit
      • 2 years ago

      How will people know it’s for gaming if it doesn’t have RGB LEDs?

      • Concupiscence
      • 2 years ago

      For some reason it looks to me like an aftermarket accessory for the Atari Jaguar. Showing my age, no doubt, but it’s genuinely ugly.

    • Bauxite
    • 2 years ago

    I’m glad this stuff is going more and more mainstream, but do not buy [b<]anything[/b<] until you first head straight to egpu.io and do a little research. There are quite a few things to watch out for when choosing docks and laptop models.

      • Bauxite
      • 2 years ago

      Also these could be a lot cheaper if intel would stop being an evil empire and allow certified boards to be sold by themselves. Drop-in ITX form factor dock pcbs would really open up the market and realistically could be churned out for $50 or less retail.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 2 years ago

        Is there any evidence Intel doesn’t allow these cards to be produced? And if manufacturers can sell the whole package for more money what’s the incentive to even produce your dream product?

          • Bauxite
          • 2 years ago

          Downvoted for truth apparently.

          Plenty of evidence, some from the manufacturer’s mouths themselves. They tried as much, intel came down on them so hard they had to make new products, a lot of their existing cages are not allowed to be sold mentioning gpus. Intel also went after the OEM that really pioneered a lot of this and basically forced them out of the TB device market with a lawsuit; Bplus started selling expresscard adapters and similar many years ago.

          The boards are not complicated at all, go “price” the controllers (https://ark.intel.com/products/family/79641/Thunderbolt-Products) as there is not much else on there. I can buy an entire freaking premium ITX cpu motherboard [i<]with thunderbolt on it[/i<] for $150, its about 10 times more complex. These TB boards are somewhere in design complexity between a usb host card or pci-e to m2 converter. As for incentive I'm pretty sure econ 101 covers that.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 2 years ago

            I didn’t downvote you. But I could if you wanted. 🙂

            I asked for evidence. You said there’s plenty. That means you’ll have no problem providing it.

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