Thermaltake’s Nemesis Switch has enough buttons for all your macros

Man, I just love mice with a bounty of buttons. It's so convenient to stick functions you'd normally have to stretch your left hand for on the mouse. It seems like Thermaltake is gearing up to serve folks like me with its just-launched Nemesis Switch gaming mouse. The shiny new pointer uses a high-end optical sensor and has RGB LED illumination built-in.

The specific sensor on offer is a variant of the PixArt PMW3360 family, like in most high-end mice right now. The sensor's pedigree means the Nemesis Switch should track movements accurately. The mouse has a total of 12 buttons. The usual three clickers are joined by a switch behind the mouse wheel and another eight buttons on the side. You can move the eight numbered caps around, although it isn't completely clear why one would do that since the buttons are all reprogrammable through the mouse's software.

The Nemesis Switch is clearly aimed at palm-gripping users with a rounded back end and a thumb rest that bows out from the left side of the mouse. The design reminds me of the original Razer Naga, albeit with four fewer buttons on the side—but that's probably a preferable design choice anyway, since the Naga's 12 buttons are a little too small. Perhaps the most interesting thing about the Thermaltake Nemesis Switch is the price: you can pick it up at Amazon for only $50.

Comments closed
    • kruky
    • 2 years ago

    It should be named Thermaltake’s Moar Gaming.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    I always thought that a d-pad or hat switch would make more sense than a grid of buttons for the thumb.

    I fingertip/claw grip my mice so I value a good grippy flat area where my thumb would be, but a 4-way mini d-pad just above buttons 1 and 2 on this mouse would be perfect for gaming. You still get 8 buttons if you include diagonals but I bet it’s way more convenient/comfortable than this arrangement, or the Razer Naga.

    More importantly, many games use the d-pad on a controller as 4 extra buttons, so having a d-pad for your mouse would be logical.

      • mudcore
      • 2 years ago

      Razer Naga Hex. 6 thumb buttons but not in the annoying row layout but a circle with a hole in the middle to rest your thumb. I had the V1, it was great until the left mouse click gave up. I decided I didn’t want to mess with their drivers after that and the mouse didn’t quite have the right shape….. but the thumb buttons were basically perfect and I wish more mice tried a similar approach. A d-pad wouldn’t be terrible either, more useful than the rows of buttons like the above Thermaltake and similar.

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        I knew someone would mention this 🙂

        There are three main complaints about the Nag Hex:

        1) There are now 7 buttons on the thumb so it should be called Hepta, not Hex.
        2) The button order is stupid; 3-7-6-5-4-1-2 and 3 is the only button aligned with the h/z axis.
        3) It’s Razer; I’ve sworn off them for QC issues in the past, but the cloud drivers are worse.

          • mudcore
          • 2 years ago

          I agree with all 3 points. I liked the V1 more than the V2 version and wouldn’t get either just because Razer. I just wish someone would do an alternative instead of yet-another-numpad-style layout.

    • Kretschmer
    • 2 years ago

    I find that multi-button mice live or die on the quality and longevity of their software. How is thermaltake on this front?

      • Voldenuit
      • 2 years ago

      I prefer the ones that store their macros on onboard ROM (don’t they all do that now?) and some even let you program macros without using the OEM software, but yeah, a bad software interface is always annoying. Razer’s build quality and always-online drivers mean they are a ‘never buy’ for me.

        • rika13
        • 2 years ago

        Razer stores theirs on the cloud. I had a Deathadder that stored its config on the ROM. Half the time it got seen as a flash drive.

      • EndlessWaves
      • 2 years ago

      Mine usually die based on the quality of their switches and wheel mechanism.

        • Kretschmer
        • 2 years ago

        Weird. I don’t think I’ve had a mouse mechanically die or degrade in the past decade.

          • Chrispy_
          • 2 years ago

          I have a Microsoft Wheel Mouse Optical that is still going strong after at least a decade (work).
          I continually kill mice at home, usually the left-click wears out after a couple of years (gaming).

          What are you using and what is your usage?

    • R-Type
    • 2 years ago

    Why are their mice pre-pozzed coming out of the factory? I find this product to be most offensive.

    • DPete27
    • 2 years ago

    Is it abnormally tall or abnormally short?

      • iBend
      • 2 years ago

      It’s just abnormally fat..
      (But it got 8pack abs)

    • DeadOfKnight
    • 2 years ago

    Looks almost exactly like another mouse design

    • thill9
    • 2 years ago

    Too bad the word accurately can’t spell itself.

      • morphine
      • 2 years ago

      Har har. Fixed.

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