Intel Pentium Gold chips now have Silver siblings

When Intel added the "Gold" suffix to its Kaby Lake Pentium processors back in October, there were rumors that the company would add the "Silver" moniker to Pentium parts based on its pint-sized, power-sipping Gemini Lake architecture. Even a stopped clock is right twice a day, and the blue silicon colossus has officially announced desktop and mobile Gemini Lake chips wearing Pentium Silver and Celeron badges.

The Silver and Gold badges will help consumers determine whether a system's processor is one of Intel's efficiency-first Gemini Lake chips or one of the higher-performing Kaby Lake models. All six new chips have 4 MB of cache and can address two channels of 2400 MT/s DDR4 or LPDDR4 memory. More details are in the table below.

 

Model Pentium Silver

J5005

Celeron

J4105

Celeron

J4005

Pentium Silver

N5000

Celeron

N4100

Celeron

N4000

Type Desktop Desktop Desktop Mobile Mobile Mobile
CPU frequency

(max.)

2.8 GHz 2.5 GHz 2.7 GHz 2.7 GHz 2.4 GHz 2.6 GHz
Cores/threads 4/4 4/4 2/2 4/4 4/4 2/2
GPU frequency

(dynamic)

800 MHz 750 MHz 700 MHz 750 MHz 700 MHz 650 MHz
IGP type UHD Graphics

605

UHD Graphics 600 UHD Graphics 600 UHD Graphics 605 UHD Graphics 600 UHD Graphics 600
TDP 10 W 10 W 10 W 6 W 6 W 6 W

All Pentium Silver and Celeron processors will come packing Gigabit Wi-Fi with 2×2 802.11ac wireless networking capable of using 160 MHz channels. Intel says this Wi-Fi solution is twice as fast as solutions that use 80 MHz channels, and 12 times faster than machines with ye olde 2.4 GHz 802.11n. The company goes on to boast that the new wireless setup is potentially faster than wired Gigabit Ethernet, though that seems more than a bit optimistic to us.

Intel says the UHD Graphics 600 and UHD Graphics 605 IGPs in the new chips can "handle the latest in enhanced media for a great experience streaming content from popular sites like YouTube and Netflix," but the company didn't mention the ability to play back 4K Netflix content. Streaming 4K Netflix has been a rather thorny issue to date, requiring either a Kaby Lake IGP or a recent Nvidia graphics card with at least 4 GB or video memory. The IGPs in the six new Intel chips are also the first in the company's value CPU line to support the Local Adaptive Contrast Enhancement feature meant to boost display visibility in harsh lighting conditions.

Intel's smaller-die architecture has always boasted good power efficiency, and the company claims a sample machine with an 11.5" screen can play ten hours of local 4K HEVC video content on a single charge of a petite 35 WHr battery. Intel also says that a computer built with a Pentium Silver N5000 processor should deliver 58% better performance in SYSmark 2014 compared to a four-year-old Pentium N3540-powered PC.

The new Pentium Silver and Celeron processors are launching today, though socketed retail CPUs aren't part of the product mix. Gerbils seeking the increased performance and improved Wi-Fi of these new chips will probably have to wait for pre-built desktop and portable systems.

Comments closed
    • Pancake
    • 2 years ago

    Now I am interested in this. If I were a betting man I’d wager a Snappy 845 would beat the snot out of this in a fair fight. Game on!

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    I think I want the Pentium Good Grief!! Edition.

    • ermo
    • 2 years ago

    I have a couple of C2Ds with dual channel DDR2-667 and even DDR3-1066 that are still chugging along here at home in both ATX and mATX form factors.

    With the rumoured performance increases, it will be quite interesting to see the ST performance of the top end quad-core Pentium Silver J5005 compared to my old E7xx 45nm boxes.

    If that CPU+GPU combination becomes well supported under Linux, I could *easily* see myself upgrade my HTPC to one of these in a NUC-like form-factor (or Mini-ITX if I decided that I wanted dGPU capability too).

    • ET3D
    • 2 years ago

    The rise in SDP is interesting. The Gemini Lake 6W chips have an SDP of 4.8W, compared to 4W for the Apollo Lake ones.

    I wonder about the performance increase vs. Apollo Lake.

    • mcarson09
    • 2 years ago

    Xeons have Platinum, Gold, and Silver. I would not doubt that there is a Pentium Platinum line too.

    • mtruchado
    • 2 years ago

    I don’t know if Netflix 4k has special requirements, but I’m the owner of a beebox with the N3000 and this cpu can play 4k videos as long as you have configure It with a dual channel configuration

    • Mr Bill
    • 2 years ago

    [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qpMvS1Q1sos<]It's all about the Pentiums Baby![/url<]

    • MileageMayVary
    • 2 years ago

    And Intel’s department of product segmentation and naming continues to put the drug use at Woodstock to shame.

      • mcarson09
      • 2 years ago

      Insert Ryzen UP joke here.

      • the
      • 2 years ago

      Woodstock is too mellow for Intel. They’ve all gone heavy metal. Expect the Extreme Edition to be replaced by the Core i9 Uranium.

    • Anonymous Coward
    • 2 years ago

    Benchmarks!

      • Redocbew
      • 2 years ago

      Bah! Gold is better than Silver. Gold must be faster.

      Wait, Platinum is better than Gold, right? Is there a Pentium Platinum? I want to get that one if there is.

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 2 years ago

        I’m unable to predict what silicon might be featured in a Pentium Platinum, or what its market position would be. Probably, its not an AMD product.

          • Redocbew
          • 2 years ago

          That was just me being snarky again and doing my best PHB impersonation. Did it work?

        • Ummagumma
        • 2 years ago

        And don’t forget Titanium, Uranium, Plutonium, and Xirconium!!

        BTW… Lithium, Sodium, Potassium, and Magnesium are depressed because they were not considered.

          • mcarson09
          • 2 years ago

          Everyone knows Xirconium is better than the rest.

    • LoneWolf15
    • 2 years ago

    I would be glad to see Atom continuing to be developed if it weren’t for one thing.

    I bought an Asrock quad-core Braswell board (N3700) with Intel’s first “decent” Atom iGPU based on the Broadwell architecture. I was super-stoked to use it for low power H.265 video decoding.

    And then I found out Intel had set up the drivers without the ability to adjust 1:1 screen scaling. Meaning that any device with an HDMI plug to a TV was pretty much kneecapped right away, because on many sets this would mean the device OS screen went outside the borders of the display. The driver control panel looked the same –but it lacked the sliders necessary to adjust the screen, something a desktop Haswell or Broadwell CPU had. So I asked questions in the Intel forum. It took me six months of back and forth to get an answer of “This feature is not available on the…If you need it, purchase an Intel Broadwell CPU…”?

    WTF?

    The whole idea of a high-end GPU was for a set-top box to do video playback with at low power consumption, and Intel effectively neutered it and made it fail at its job. They acted like it was something the GPU didn’t support, but I have a hard time believing it isn’t just an artificial limitation. I sold the board, and said that’s enough -I won’t buy anything with an Atom because it won’t meet my needs. Everything else was perfect, and they screwed it up over one tiny thing. Because of that, the J5005 that might be interesting can go in the dumpster for all I care; the documentation is non-existent about this information, and I’m not willing to be a guinea pig again.

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      I agree it’s a silly oversight from Intel but at the same time, the blame and the fault is 100% your television.

      Any TV that cannot put 1 input pixel into one actual pixel is defective, or dated to the point of uselessness.

        • willmore
        • 2 years ago

        So the solution for one device failing the Robustness Principle is to say it’s good taht another should fail it as well?

          • Chrispy_
          • 2 years ago

          I don’t think the Robustness Principle applies here.

          I’d be willing to bet that LoneWolf’s TV was actually capable of 1:1 anyway, but it just wasn’t obvious to disable the overscan.

            • LoneWolf15
            • 2 years ago

            Actually, it wasn’t. 42″ Panasonic Plasma, 1080p. No 1:1 settings

            I now have a 50″ 1080p Panasonic Plasma and it’s a little easier to configure (yes, I’m old-school and love Panny plasmas especially the final 2012-13 ones) but I still can’t fully trim out the overscan without using the driver controls. I sold the Braswell board when it couldn’t do what I wanted, even though it was a cool piece of technology. I got a low-voltage Kaby Lake i5-7500T which is overkill and pricey in comparison, but eliminates the issue. I would have liked to go lower than 35w TDP though. Yes, I could have gone i3, but the moment a new format of video comes out that isn’t fully decoded in hardware, it loads a CPU like that hard. Starting with Coffee Lake i3 chips, that may no longer be an issue.

            I hope AsRock releases a Gemini Lake replacement board of similar specs to try. The N3700-ITX board I had was just a neat piece of kit, relatively well thought out, and even had 5.1 audio onboard, all for an inexpensive price.

      • rootheday3
      • 2 years ago

      Full disclosure: while I work for Intel; the opinions I express here are my own

      I think I understanding the issue you ran into. For the Braswell platform (and Cherrview and Baytrail before them), the display hardware was limited – only had one display scaler. The display scaler could, in principle, be used for overscan compensation on HDMI but could also be used if, for example you are playing a game with a swap chain resolution which is different from the panel native resolution.

      Trying to switch the scaler on the fly between different outputs dynamically would be messy- how do you anticipate which output should get the scaler and for what usage? For mobile skus with an internal panel, it made sense to bind the scaler to the internal display always because that is the panel that is “always there” and thus provides clean support for those local usage models (like gaming at non-native resolution).

      Of course for a desktop sku like you had, that doesn’t necessarily make as much sense – no internal display means the scaler should in principle be free to be bound to one of the external outputs. A different behavior for desktop skus (e.g. to allow user to assign the scaler to a particular output) have been added as a nice enhancement but at some cost of software/user experience complexity. Not sure if that capability was ever added as a driver enhancement.

      The good news is that later platforms (including Atom platforms based like Apollo Lake and Gemini Lake) don’t have this “single scaler” restriction – they have scalers for each display pipe. So if that is the only hold up from you buying a NUC-like product based on Apollo Lake/Gemini Lake, then you should be good to go.

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 2 years ago

        If only technical information was always so easy to come by!

        • LoneWolf15
        • 2 years ago

        Thank you for being so informative; no-one in the Intel Communities (including Intel) could give me a solid technical answer, and it took them six months to give me a yes/no answer at all.

        The only other thing that would hold me up would be if that slider isn’t in the actual driver software. I really liked that board and it was cool to have an mITX platform with low power consumption that could do H.264/265 decoding properly.

        Actually, one other thing: Do the new N5000/J5005 CPUs have full 10-bit VP9 decoding in hardware with the HD605 graphics? That would be important to me too.

          • rootheday3
          • 2 years ago

          Re VP9 10 bit decode – see the Anandtech article [url=https://www.anandtech.com/show/12146/intel-launches-gemini-lake-pentium-silver-and-celeron-socs-new-cpu-media-features<]here[/url<]. The answer is: yes, same media codecs as Kabylake including VP9 10 bit. RE: graphics/display control panel support for custom aspect ratio/scaling (sliders in your comment), I believe the "missing sliders" in Braswell is directly related to whether display scaler is available for that display output - same fundamental issue. Since Geminilake (and ApolloLake) have scalers for all display pipes, the control panel would offer the custom aspect ratio option and scaling sliders. edit: to fix bbcode url tag

            • LoneWolf15
            • 2 years ago

            Thank you for providing information the Intel employees in the Community forums could not. You gave me far more useful information than I was given in six months of runaround after having provided screenshots and other information. Taking that time means a lot, and that I’ll actually consider Gemini Lake as a project piece when I can actually get it instead of dismissing it.

            Sincerely appreciated.

      • Kretschmer
      • 2 years ago

      Thanks for an informative post!

    • adisor19
    • 2 years ago

    Bragging about 2×2 WiFi in 2017.. wow Whatever happened with that third radio Intel ?

    Adi

      • Wirko
      • 2 years ago

      That’s perfectly enough to make the Management Engine reachable if a rogue user disconnects his network cable.

      • adisor19
      • 2 years ago

      What’s with the hate lads ? Y’all like slow WiFi ?

      Adi

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        Because a 2×2 wifi solution that pushes > 1 Gbit on an ultra-cheap platform sure doesn’t sound too bad compared to the half-speed 2×2 wifi that Apple puts in the iPad [b<]PRO[/b<] that can't even do a gigabit.

    • drfish
    • 2 years ago

    So, Pentium Foot Powder and Pentium Elderly Vitamin – got it!

    Can’t wait for Pentium Hair Dye and Pentium Spray Tan.

      • The Egg
      • 2 years ago

      +3 for you, my good sir

      BTW, you just made a more valuable contribution than the entirety of Intel’s marketing team over the past 10 years combined.

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      Pentium the flamethrower!

      The kids love that one.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 2 years ago

        Pentium II: The Quest for More Money

          • mcarson09
          • 2 years ago

          No the was the pentium III. The pentium II was the empire strikes back.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 2 years ago

            It was a [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oNZove4OTtI<]SpaceBalls reference[/url<] in reply to Chuckula's SpaceBalls reference (jump to around 38 seconds). Meanwhile he got down voted for his, which is sad.

            • mcarson09
            • 2 years ago

            He was down voted for being Chuckula. Spaceballs is a very good movie.

          • jihadjoe
          • 2 years ago

          Pentium Pro and Pentium II really should’ve been called the Hexium

        • derFunkenstein
        • 2 years ago

        You got -2 from someone because they don’t get a Mel Brooks reference. What is this world coming to?

          • K-L-Waster
          • 2 years ago

          It’ll take a miracle to save him…

        • alloyD
        • 2 years ago

        I HATE YOGURT!

    • dragontamer5788
    • 2 years ago

    I liked it better when they called these chips “Atom”. It was a more clear distinction.

    “Pentium Gold” is Kaby Lake. “Pentium Silver” is Gemini Lake (aka: formerly known as Atom). That’s a bit too confusing IMO.

    There’s definitely a good reason to develop these “good enough” CPUs. Most people only need a tablet or even cellphone as their primary computing tool. AKA: Facebook / Gmail machines, and not much else.

      • mudcore
      • 2 years ago

      Given the branding and specs I imagine the biggest market for these are edge devices like edge routers, small remote location VM hosts, etc.

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      Agreed. Adding Gold/Silver without removing other designations is just adding to the confusion rather than clearing it up. Now there are the following products/names:

      Pentium Gold G (Kaby 2C4T desktop 51-54W)
      Pentium (Kaby Lake 2C4T low-power SFF 34W)
      Pentium Silver N series (Apollo Lake 4C4T Atom 15W)
      Pentium Silver J series (Apollo Lake 4C4T Atom 6W)
      Pentium (Kaby Lake U 2C4T mobile 15W)
      Pentium (Kaby Lake Y 2C4T ultra mobile 6W)

      The performance and efficiency differences are an of magnitude apart between opposite ends of the scale for just this “Current generation Pentium” moniker. We’re also in the predicament that Celerons don’t get the gold/silver naming, but a Kaby Lake Celeron will still outperform any Pentium Silver. Intel just need to clear up their whole naming scheme, it’s becoming a total fustercluck, if it’s not already there.

      • DavidC1
      • 2 years ago

      These chips are actually decent.

      The Goldmont Plus cores in these chips are 30% faster per clock than the current Goldmont core based chips. Goldmont cores are 30% faster than Silvermont cores in the 2013-2014 Atoms.

      The single thread performance is 10-20 behind the Kabylake Celerons but multi-core is close to 50% faster. Now that’s with these chips being at 6W versus the Celerons being at 15W.

      These also integrate the WiFi for the first time ever, for lower costs. It’s partial integration, with some still being needed externally, but we’ll get there.

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        Interesting.

        You say 10-20% behind Kabylake Celerons. Is that an average across all tasks or an “up to” figure in specific applications?

        I don’t hate the new out-of-order Atoms (starting with Silvermont). They’re not turds like the old stuff based on Bonnell architecture, but I have a hard time based on my Bay-trail and Cherry-trail experience believing that general purpose performance is as fast as you say. The difference between 10W Moorefield and a slow old Pentium B940 (2C2T Sandy Bridge) is still painfully obvious – and I mean order-of-magnitude obvious.

        My guess is that optimisations in Goldmont+ are specific to browsing and media consumption, and that’s actually fine as long as they’re ending up in Chromebooks and casual netbooks. Game performance is woeful and any kind of taxing emulation or software rendering throws my Atom tablet into a crippling stuttery mess.

          • DavidC1
          • 2 years ago

          The number I gave is on Geekbench.

          Here’s a guide though.

          [url<]http://www.cpu-monkey.com/en/compare_cpu-intel_pentium_n4200-658-vs-intel_celeron_3855u-613[/url<] Ark pages show Celerons are even slower, while Geminilake is 20-30% faster. I can see in cases like multi-thread, even the Pentium Kabylake shown above might be outperformed. They are very respectable considering it uses only 6W. Here's a comparison of Apollo Lake with Skylake Celeron: [url<]http://www.cpu-monkey.com/en/compare_cpu-intel_pentium_n4200-658-vs-intel_celeron_3855u-613[/url<] "10W Moorefield and a slow old Pentium B940 (2C2T Sandy Bridge) is still painfully obvious - and I mean order-of-magnitude obvious." They may be binary orders of magnitude difference, but not decimal orders of magnitude difference. Since the definition for orders of magnitude seems to be based on the decimal system, no its not that wide. "but I have a hard time based on my Bay-trail and Cherry-trail experience believing that general purpose performance is as fast as you say. " Like I said, 20-30% from BT/CT to Goldmont, and another 20-30% going to Goldmont Plus. That's huge. Athlon X2s were 20-30% faster than top Presler chips, and Core 2 chips were 20-30% over Athlon X2s. I can see why they are reluctant to use the Atom branding. People based on previous experience look at Atom and go "yuck."

            • Chrispy_
            • 2 years ago

            I can’t wait to get my hands on some Gemini Lake SoCs. The Apollo Lake NUC is far from speedy, but it’s one of the first NUCs I’ve used that feels like an upgrade from old Nehalem or even late-model Core2 PCs.

      • ET3D
      • 2 years ago

      They called them Pentium before. Atom was for ultra-mobile (2W SDP), and Pentium and Celeron for desktop and more power hungry devices. So marking as Silver and Gold increases the distinction.

      • tipoo
      • 2 years ago

      Agreed, but it’s an improvement over calling both Broadwell and Braswell cores Celerons at least, making you hunt further for the product number to see if it would be a pukey slow core or not.

      Silver = little core is easy enough.

        • Voldenuit
        • 2 years ago

        [quote<]Silver = little core is easy enough.[/quote<] Gold is bold, Silver is sliver.

    • techguy
    • 2 years ago

    None of the table’s column headers contain the word “gold”.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 2 years ago

      You are correct.

      • EndlessWaves
      • 2 years ago

      Those are just the new chips introduced today, the Gold ones are (some of) the Kaby Lake ones already launched.

    • JosiahBradley
    • 2 years ago

    lol wut

    Edit: I was expecting far more down votes, thanks for being so nice everyone.

      • willmore
      • 2 years ago

      I was realy trying for something starting with “Hold my beer…”, but I’m blank. Too many meetings.

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