Report: Intel Inside co-marketing program will get a budget cut

If you're reading this site, you're almost certainly familiar with the wide-reaching "Intel Inside" branding. Intel Inside isn't just a fancy logo and a slogan, though. Since 1991, Intel has operated a "co-operative marketing program" under the name, and through the program Intel funnels a lot of cash into the industry by helping vendors cover advertising and marketing costs. Now, CRN is reporting that Intel intends to cut funding for the program by some amount between 40 and 60 percent of its existing budget.

According to CRN's unidentified sources, the cuts are being made so that Intel can move the funds to "other groups within Intel that aren't channel-specific or PC-centric." The site then goes on to say that the funds will be put to work reinforcing Intel's position in the datacenter. Intel apparently confirmed to CRN that the program would be altered, but did not elaborate on the degree or depth of the changes.

Cuts to Intel's co-marketing program will almost certainly have wide-ranging effects on the industry. CRN's sources claim that since Intel Inside's membership was based on volume, the largest cuts will be hitting the largest OEMs, and that smaller sellers will be less affected. Given that, we don't think most TR readers should be too worried. Still, vendors will likely have to reduce advertising spending, raise prices, or make cuts in other areas to make up for the loss of Intel's cash infusion.

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    • albundy
    • 2 years ago

    no amount of marketing could have helped them during the ryzen release.

    • frogg
    • 2 years ago

    “reinforcing Intel’s position in the datacenter.” 99% is not enough ?

      • mudcore
      • 2 years ago

      Nvidia has way more of the market than that already if you’re catching my drift.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    That lame, catchy jingle needs to die. It’s so out of place whenever I hear it in an advert.

    I also associate the “Intel Inside” branding with companies that have been caught, convicted, and fined for abusive anti-competitive practices. It’s not a logo anyone wants to be associated with, IMO.

      • NTMBK
      • 2 years ago

      [quote<]I also associate the "Intel Inside" branding with companies that have been caught, convicted, and fined for abusive anti-competitive practices.[/quote<] Really? I just associate it with beige 90s desktops.

      • srg86
      • 2 years ago

      Wow, reading way too much into that.

      As opposed to AMD who, due to lack of marketing, still probably gets a “who?” from the general public?

      • IGTrading
      • 2 years ago

      That’s good.

      The Intel Inside program was a massive bribing scheme giving OEMs billions in bribes not to develop systems based on AMD chips.

      Very well documented here : [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=osSMJRyxG0k[/url<] Here is the legal case from the European Supreme Justice Court : [url<]http://curia.europa.eu/juris/liste.jsf?num=C-413/14[/url<] This company is like an organized crime entity and we've been made to pay for these bribes while performance, efficiency and the advantages of free competition were robbed from us.

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        I love how you’re down to -5 for citing your evidence.

        Not that you should care, it’s just amusing how much some people are in denial πŸ˜‰

          • chuckula
          • 2 years ago

          Citing the same monetized propaganda video over and over again in a braindead cut-n-paste spam campaign isn’t only worthy of downthumbs, it frankly should be grounds for the banhammer to fall especially since IGTrading has literally never had a single independent thought that goes further than “INTEL BAD AMD GOOD!” in his life.

            • NeoForever
            • 2 years ago

            Care to post sources that prove Intel didn’t do those things?
            Or should we take you not replying directly to his points as fact that you got nothing?

            I don’t even care if IGTrading is an AMD employee. Is what he said not true?

            • chuckula
            • 2 years ago

            [quote<]Care to post sources that prove Intel didn't do those things? [/quote<] Not my job. I'm not the one trying to make money posting clickbait and I have as much responsibility to prove an negative about Intel as any rational person has a responsibility to provide "proof" that the earth is round in response to a dumbass flat-earth youtube video.

            • IGTrading
            • 2 years ago

            I’ve worked in on the hardware side of IT since 1995 so, after 22 years, I should know how Intel’s “marketing” / bribing scheme works πŸ™‚

            Since my career also had me working in 3 different countries, I had experience with Intel’s “inside bribing” scheme on an international level as well.

            Since you claim to be so knowledgeable in … basically everything πŸ˜‰ …. may we know the length of your career Mr. Cuckula and if its hardware related ? We’ll assume you’re an honest person.

            • chuckula
            • 2 years ago

            Appeals to authority are stupid logical fallacies.

            Appeals to authority where you cite yourself as the authority are stupid logical fallacies used by d-bags.

            • IGTrading
            • 2 years ago

            NeoForever, I don’t work for AMD, but I’d love to. πŸ™‚

            Do you know any opportunities there for a guy with 22 years of IT hardware / investment consulting / state bids & large scale projects / system design / demand and capacity management / hardware maintenance & repair experience ?! πŸ™‚

            Frankly, I guess they need architects and coders not me …. but who knows …

            Ha! I’ll check their jobs portal this weekend, just to see what’s there πŸ™‚

            P.S. If I get a job at AMD, I’ll fly over and personally deliver you an entire case of expensive French brandy (made at a monastery in the Alps) or whatever you like, NeoForever. I hope my team doesn’t kill me tomorrow …..

          • IGTrading
          • 2 years ago

          I know πŸ™‚ ignorant fanboys are mad and have difficulties reading official links from the highest European Justice Court πŸ™‚

          And if the video documentary is true, well documented and clear, they’re mad it’s monetized like that can be any sort of pseudoargument πŸ™‚

            • Wonders
            • 2 years ago

            You posted a link containing two documents that state the court has not yet issued final judgment (which includes the opinion of the Advocate General that final judgment should not and could not have been issued). Which document did you want us to focus on in particular?

            1) The Judgement of the Court
            [quote<]the judgment of the General Court must be set aside, since, in its analysis of whether the rebates at issue were capable of restricting competition, the General Court wrongly failed to take into consideration Intel’s line of argument seeking to expose alleged errors committed by the Commission in the AEC test.[/quote<] 2) Opinion of Advocate General Nils Wahl: [quote<]In the light of the nature of the errors committed by the General Court with regard to the first, second, third and fifth grounds of appeal, the state of the present proceedings does not in my view permit final judgment to be given.[/quote<]

            • IGTrading
            • 2 years ago

            Yes mate, I did. πŸ™‚

            You know how you get to recognize the local drug dealer because you always see him at the street corner late in the evening, passing stuff to cars rolling slowly ?

            If that guy gets arrested and a prosecutor is investigating him, you could be considered the most ignorant neighbor if you get a big “NOT GUILTY” sign and start arguing in forum comments that the drug dealer is “innocent” , “hasn’t been proven guilty yet” or other nonsense like that.

            If you have any idea about the hardware market of the past 30 years, you know what Intel is up to and after it has been convicted in Japan, Korea, Italy and Germany, you would be the most bizarre person if you start arguing that in the European Court of Justice case Intel is suddenly “innocent” .

            Contradicting for the sake of contradiction is like correcting grammar mistakes when you have no idea what’s being discussed πŸ˜‰

            Source : [url<]http://www.esquire.com/news-politics/news/a43468/stop-pointing-out-typos/[/url<]

    • tygrus
    • 2 years ago

    It’s a problem when the sticker on the outside got so fancy it started costing more than the manufacture cost of the piece of silicon inside the CPU !

    Intel are also planning on cutting the subsidies to anyone who dares sell more AMD then the 10 to 20% that Intel tolerates (that saves the budget).

    • hasseb64
    • 2 years ago

    Cut founds and lower prices instead maybe?

    • tipoo
    • 2 years ago

    Does this mean vendors will stop getting cut backs for putting gunky stickers all over attractive machines?

    …please?

      • Redocbew
      • 2 years ago

      Sounds like it, but I doubt we’ll see a matching drop in the number of gunky stickers being applied. Marketing people do like their stickers even if they’re not getting paid to use them.

      • meerkt
      • 2 years ago

      Intel stickers were pretty good at being removable without leaving much or any residue, I found.

        • Wirko
        • 2 years ago

        Most people never remove stickers from laptops, monitors, even TVs. Maybe they believe there’s some sort of magic in them, or the processor, or licenses that allow you tou use the laptop.

          • meerkt
          • 2 years ago

          Not sure why. It’s so ugly.

        • tipoo
        • 2 years ago

        Hm odd, I always found them the strongest stuck. But they do take most of their residue with them unlike some.

        • tootercomputer
        • 2 years ago

        I agree, mine always came off easily, never had problems. It was kind of obnoxious, though, but if it saved a few bucks, that’s fine with me, and maybe that savings will not be gone.

        I always enjoyed getting the logo stickers from the various manufacturers. I had a case, long gone now, that I covered with stickers from AMD, Newegg, Patriot, EVGA, Gigabyte, Antec, G.Skill, Corsair, MSI, Albatron and Soltek, and on and on.

    • obsidian76
    • 2 years ago

    “co-operative marketing program” aka “bribes”

      • IGTrading
      • 2 years ago

      Yes πŸ™‚

    • NTMBK
    • 2 years ago

    Strange to cut a key marketing fund just when AMD finally have a competitive product, and Qualcomm are trying to take a chunk of the laptop market.

      • Redocbew
      • 2 years ago

      The unit that Raja was just hired to manage is the first thing I thought of, but I guess there’s no way of knowing until the effects of the cuts start to take shape.

      • Welch
      • 2 years ago

      My thoughts exactly. I can only imagine that it is likely one of 3 things (or combination).

      1.) This sort of marketing isn’t worth it since Intel is so recognized even by the lamen, so if it isn’t effective why pay the big guys like Dell/HP to market their own products when you can just put out vendor neutral marketing materials.

      2.) A bit more nefarious of a theory, that Intel isn’t able to bribe big vendors anymore since AMD is starting to actually have attractive and competitive products again. So the cash offerings weren’t worth it for big vendors who will stand to make more from offering AMD products and bringing excitement back to the PC market?

      3.) Intel is going to position themselves in other markets now that AMD is competing so they can’t just maintain a monopoly. That money is better spent instead to push into other emerging markets like deep learning for autonomous cars. These areas are like the wild west right now, similar to the SSD market of a few years ago. Everyone is going to fight and when the dust settles people will know who is top dog. Intel has the deep pockets to be that top dog. This market is perfect for them as they have the track record of data integrity, high I/O and they never like to race to the bottom. Who wants the cheaper option when it comes to the safety of your vehicle being driven by a computer?

      Just spit balling some ideas.

      • IGTrading
      • 2 years ago

      Yes.

      They need the money to do better R&D and design some competitive products.

      It’s good news.

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