Acer details specs and prices of its Ryzen Mobile-powered Swift 3s

We've already seen HP's first go-round with AMD's Raven Ridge mobile APU, and now Acer is entering the fray with mobile Ryzen variations of its mainstream Swift 3 notebook. The machines' all-metal bodies, backlit keyboards, and svelte 0.74" (1.9 cm) profiles are carried over from the Intel versions, but the Intel Core processors and optional Nvidia GeForce MX150 graphics in those systems give way to four-core, eight-thread Ryzen chips with integrated Radeon Vega graphics.

The main difference between the two Ryzen-powered Swifts is the APU inside. The $750 SF315-41-R8PP packs a Ryzen 5 2500U APU with 2 GHz base and 3.6 GHz boost clocks to go along with Radeon Vega 8 graphics. An extra $200 nets the SF315-41-R6J9 and its 2.2 GHz Ryzen 7 2700U processor. That chip boosts all the way up to 3.8 Ghz and features integrated Radeon Vega 10 graphics. We don't know if these machines will have mobile XFR enabled, as it was in the HP Envy x360 we tested, so performance could vary depending on the TDP Acer chooses to implement.

For those without AMD model number flash cards, the Ryzen 5 2500U's Vega 8 is an IGP with 512 stream processors within eight compute units, running at 1100 MHz. The Vega 10 in the 2700U cranks the clock speed up to a 1300 MHz and piles on a total of 640 SPs in 10 CUs. Both Ryzen Swifts have 8 GB of DDR4 memory and 15.6" IPS displays with a resolution of 1920×1080. The Ryzen 5 model has a 256 GB SSD of indeterminant interface and manufacture, and the Ryzen 7 variation gets a roomier 512 GB drive.

These are laptops in the year 2017, so the inclusion of 802.11ac Wi-Fi and SD card readers should just about go without saying. The I/O cluster includes a pair of USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-A ports, a single USB 3.1 Type 1 Type-C port, one USB 2.0 connector, and an HDMI port.

The machines measure 14.6" wide, 10" deep, and 0.74" thick (37 cm x 26 cm x 1.9 cm) and weigh in at 4.85 lbs. (2.2 kg). At least some of that weight comes from the four-cell 3320 mAh battery. The Swift 3 SF315-51-518S with an Intel Core i5-8250U and otherwise comparable specifications has identical dimensions and weighs a bit less at 4.41 lbs. (2 kg). 

As we noted, the Swift 3 SF315-41-R8PP with the AMD Ryzen 5 2500U APU rings in at $750 and the Swift 3 SF315-41-R6J9 is priced at $950. For comparison's sake, a similar Intel machine with integrated graphics and a 256 GB SSD lists at $700. Acer didn't provide ship dates for the Ryzen versions of the Swift 3, but we'd expect these systems to be available soon.

Comments closed
    • Welch
    • 2 years ago

    I could see them making the 2700u version support XFR if it in fact supports the higher 25w TDP. This may make the $200 difference worth it if you are getting 256gb MORE SSD, faster base and turbo clocks with XFR and the better Vega.

    Of course I’d like to see the price drop on both of these units. $649 on the 2500 and $799 on the 2700 would make these incredibly attractive laptops.

    Also, feels like the vendors totally dropped the ball on getting these out in time for Christmas shoppers, what a missed opportunity. Now they will mostly sit on shelves until discounted for resell before summer when people stop worrying about their computers as they come out of hibernation. These needed releasing and availability after Black Friday/Cyber Monday.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    The 2700U is a hard sell for another $200.

    It’s probably a great chip, but the history of shared-system-memory GPUs has shown us that they are bandwidth limited a lot of the time anyway, and your $200 nets you exactly zero extra bandwidth 🙁

      • mczak
      • 2 years ago

      Don’t forget it’s not just the 2700U which costs another 200$, you also get a 512GB SSD instead of 256GB. Since they’ve got just these two models, it’s impossible to tell how much of the higher price is due to the larger ssd and cpu, but it would probably be more like 100$ more for the cpu upgrade alone.
      Albeit I’m not sure if the 100$ would be worth it (because you’re probably right, it’s not going to be a whole lot faster, especially not if it’s using the default 15W TDP), it does sound more reasonable. (Basically intel is similar there, if you get the mobile i5 vs i7 barely makes a difference neither with cpu nor gpu performance, but the price difference is usually quite noticeable.)

        • NoOne ButMe
        • 2 years ago

        this model was confirmed to be a 25W version of the 2700U.

        Or rather a 2700U with the TPD set to 25W instead of 15W.

      • mtruchado
      • 2 years ago

      A Ryzen 7 2700U with a RX 540 is also confirmed, see my previous post

    • gerryg
    • 2 years ago

    Question for the battery nerds: If I know the mAh rating, why do I care how many cells it has?

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      Because mAh — which means milli-amp hours — doesn’t tell you what the [b<]energy capacity[/b<] of a battery is. It just tells you how long a cell can discharge one millamp of current (or a value scaled from one milliamp). The problem is that merely knowing current levels isn't enough without also knowing the voltage levels that are expected when operating the battery. You need to have both pieces of information to make the correct conclusion, and voltage levels can vary based on the type of cell and (more importantly) the configuration of the cells between different batteries. Oversimplified example: A battery with "1 milliamp hour" at 100V has a capacity of (I * V) 0.1 Watt Hours. A battery with "10 milliamp hours" at 10V has a capacity of 0.01 Watt Hours, so the smaller "milliamp hour" battery is actually 10 times larger. Here's a simple calculator: [url<]https://milliamps-watts.appspot.com/[/url<]

        • gerryg
        • 2 years ago

        Thanks for the lesson. What I learned from this is that vendors still like to trot out non-informational data points just to say they provide specifications, even though it doesn’t mean anything. Good thing we have TR and the like to provide REAL data in their reviews.

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        I prefer Wh battery ratings for this exact reason.

        I had NiMH AA batteries a couple of decades ago that claimed 2400mAh each, so I find it amusing when these giant 2lbs battery packs for DTR laptops are advertised as 7200mAh. I mean, I have a old torch that runs on 3 AA batteries – pretty sure those two power sources are not remotely comparable despite having the same rating…..

    • smilingcrow
    • 2 years ago

    “At least some of that weight comes from the four-cell 3320 mAh battery. ”

    WHrs is far more useful when describing laptop batteries as the voltages can vary.
    Assuming 19V gives a decent for this class of device 63WHrs.

    • dragontamer5788
    • 2 years ago

    So basically an HP Envy x360 ($729) except:

    * No Stylus
    * No Touchscreen
    * SSD by default (HP Envy upgrades to SSD, but it makes it a bit more costly)

    Otherwise, both are 15-inches. The +$200 for the Ryzen 7 seems like a waste however, since the Intel + MX150 models are available below that price point.

    • not@home
    • 2 years ago

    So what kind of battery life would this get? My phone has a 3500mAh battery, this has 3320mAh. I don’t see why all these manufacturers don’t cram the biggest possible battery they can into their products.

      • Flying Fox
      • 2 years ago

      4+ lbs is not exactly light for a laptop if you do want to carry it around all day. And everyone has caught the thinness bug unfortunately.

      • DavidC1
      • 2 years ago

      Battery capacity isn’t mAH, but WHr.

      Basic equation tells us Power = Voltage x Current(P = VI)

      Your phone likely is a 1 cell, and modern Lithium Polymer chemistries are at 3.7V.

      Your phone = 3.7 x 3.5 = 12.95WHr

      Laptops are at 4-8 cells depending on the size. I think its reasonable to expect this Acer has a 4 cell.

      This laptop = 4 x 3.7 x 3.32 = 49.136WHr

      That makes this laptop have a battery nearly 4x your phone.

      • dragontamer5788
      • 2 years ago

      [quote<]My phone has a 3500mAh battery, this has 3320mAh. [/quote<] The amount of power a battery holds is MULTIPLIED by the voltage. Phone batteries are commonly 3.3V, while Laptops might be 12V or so. (Subject to manufacturer details). Normalize to "Watt-hours" if you want to compare different batteries. [quote<]I don't see why all these manufacturers don't cram the biggest possible battery they can into their products.[/quote<] There are TSA restrictions on the size of Lithium Ion batteries allowed on Airplanes. Do you want to be able to take your laptop onto an airplane? Then you need to buy one below a certain capacity. The TSA restriction is kind of hard to calculate: you are allowed 2-grams of Lithium, [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XT1B27DAATs<]which is highly explosive btw[/url<]. And Lithium is the magic metal that basically "stores" the energy in your batteries. (See chemistry that I honestly don't know, lol). Lithium fires are a "metallic fire", and do not require oxygen to continue. So you can't even put them out by snuffing them out. Heck, even [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bromotrifluoromethane<]Halon 1301 (aka: standard fire extinguishers)[/url<] fails to put out a Lithium fire. (See: [url=https://www.apigroupinc.com/news/headline/defend_against_metalfree_lithiumion_battery_fires_with_sprinklers.html<] this link[/url<]) Anything more than 2-grams of Lithium per person is a risk to the airplane... especially because of how difficult it is to put out a Lithium fire.

        • mudcore
        • 2 years ago

        Your answer for TSA is right but completely besides the point. Only a handful of laptops on the entire market push near that limit. This Acer certainly doesn’t. For most laptops its much more a factor of price, size, weight, and product segmentation as to why they don’t have larger batteries. Not because going any larger would push against the TSA limit.

          • NoOne ButMe
          • 2 years ago

          the limit is 100WHr, iirc.

          hence you see DTR/gaming notebooks top out at 99WHr.

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      mAh is a completely useless rating by itself.

      That’s like saying the speed of my truck is 5800RPM – it has bearing whatsoever on how fast the actual wheels are turning. That doesn’t mean a 50cc moped is faster because it revs at 9000rpm. We know for a fact that it can’t even manage 25mph up a gentle hill.

    • Waco
    • 2 years ago

    I can’t wait till these start ending up in the 11″-13″ notebooks.

      • Concupiscence
      • 2 years ago

      If I could get an Acer ZenBook with Ryzen Mobile, I’d be a very happy camper.

      edit: Asus, yes, posted before my coffee

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        Getting an [b<][i<]Acer[/b<][/i<] Zenbook with anything in it at all would be quite the feat!

          • gerryg
          • 2 years ago

          Heh, that sure was a swift reply!

        • Waco
        • 2 years ago

        Asus, but yes, I’m in the same boat!

      • Airmantharp
      • 2 years ago

      These are literally the laptops that this AMD CPU is built for…

      …or should be.

    • mtruchado
    • 2 years ago

    according cyberport (German retailer)

    [url<]https://www.cyberport.de/?token=ef75ea206c5c471312ae88f48a10f395&sSearchId=5a37ce8e48686&EVENT=itemsearch&view=liste&query=swift+3+ryzen&filterkategorie=[/url<] Acer Swift 3 SF315 Notebook grau Ryzen 5 2500U SSD Full HD IPS Vega8 Windows 10 - 799€ - available in 1-3 days Acer Swift 3 SF315 Notebook grau Ryzen 7 2700U SSD Full HD IPS Vega10 Windows 10 - 899€ 18.1.2018 Acer Swift 3 SF315 Notebook grau Ryzen 7 2700U SSD Full HD IPS RX 540 Windows 10 - 999€ 11.1.2018

      • njoydesign
      • 2 years ago

      RX540? Umm, how is this going to work? Is it either Vega or Polaris that can be used at once, or can they work together? To me it’s a very strange combo, because if it’s just one chip at a time, then rx540 is not going to offer much more than the Vega 10, just that it won’t be starved for bandwidth. At the cost of battery life and extra heat.

      And 8Gb of RAM even in the priciest option? What year is this?

    • derFunkenstein
    • 2 years ago

    I wouldn’t worry too much about these listing for $50 more than the roughly-equivalent Intel variant. If I were AMD, I’d worry much more about these only being $50 less than the roughly-equivalent Intel variant [url=https://www.acer.com/ac/en/US/content/model/NX.GSJAA.001<]with an MX150[/url<] included (as Jeff so eloquently demonstrated in his review of the HP system)

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      AMD forgot that when Inhell overcharges for parts [b<]AND[/b<] Ngreedia overcharges for parts that it's like multiplying two negative numbers together and accidentally getting a positive!

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 2 years ago

      I doubt AMD has priced their chips high. Rather, I think Acer is betting they can sell at a rather high price, at least for a period of time.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 2 years ago

        That should still cause AMD to worry that they’re going to sit on shelves.

    • tsk
    • 2 years ago

    Great, now get both the Intel and AMD version and compare.

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