Poll: What product category are you most excited about for 2018?

The almost-past year of 2017 was a big one for CPU technology announcements. We got AMD's Ryzen and Threadripper units plus Intel's Core X family and a range of Coffee Lake processors. Over on the graphics card aisle, we got the mighty GeForce GTX 1080 Ti and AMD's Radeon RX Vega 56 and Vega 64 cards.

With all that new hardware, we bet that more than a few of you took the upgrade plunge and built spankin' new systems for yourselves, friends, or family. But time goes on and the computing train doesn't have a final stop. 2018 is shaping up to be another contested year for hardware, and we're wondering what you gerbils are looking forward to the most.

Interesting prospects could include graphics cards based on Nvidia's Volta and AMD's Navi architectures, Ryzen 2 processors, ninth-generation Intel Core CPUs, DDR5 memory, or maybe even more products similar to the 3D XPoint-powered Optane SSDs. We could perhaps see 4K high-refresh-rate HDR monitors with G-Sync or FreeSync, too. What product category has you most excited for 2018? Let us know using the poll below.

Comments closed
    • LoneWolf15
    • 2 years ago

    Coffee Lake/Gemini Lake NUCs, slated for Q1-Q2.

    Gemini especially, as it should be low power, cheap, and yet have great HEVC H.265 10-bit decode.

    • JoeKiller
    • 2 years ago

    I looking forward to a next gen VR game that becomes the must play.

    • remosito
    • 2 years ago

    Voted other:

    private use:
    – First prototypes of next gen VR headsets

    work use:
    – optane dimm (for our database servers)

    • Ninjitsu
    • 2 years ago

    I’m oddly not excited about anything. Everything seems a familiar pattern at this point, and increasingly expensive.

    • dizzydevil
    • 2 years ago

    I’m a fan of mini PCs and SFFs with small footprint.

    Looking forward to Intel’s new NUC line-up. Interested to see which CPUs will be used in them, and if Skull Canyon’s successor will really include AMD graphics chip.

    If so, hoping a more efficient cooling system be used in Hades Canyon NUC, and quieter fans in the other Intel NUC models too.

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    I’m curious to see how Ryzen 2 improves over the first iteration.

    • ermo
    • 2 years ago

    Where are we at manufacturing-wise with pixel density on smartphone screens and therefore HMD’s?

    I’m saving up for a 2nd gen HMD for VR applications. For Star Citizen and Project CARS 2, VR is likely to be the best way to experience the respective titles, not to mention that doing 3D CAD/CAE design validation in ‘walk-around’ VR is sure to have some interesting benefits.

    Of course I also would like to get a 32:9 FreeSync display, a Zen+ box to go with my Vega 64 etc. etc.

    Decisions, decisions.

    • rudimentary_lathe
    • 2 years ago

    I’m excited about a larger selection of large, high resolution monitors with high refresh rates and adaptive sync technology hitting the market. Hopefully the prices come down significantly in this category.

    I’m excited to see if AMD can further close the single-threaded gap with Intel with Ryzen 2.

    Other than that, I’m a bit dismayed with tech recently. Prices seem to be going up for the same level of performance, something that doesn’t happen often with PC tech. I wouldn’t mind upgrading to a DDR4 system, but with prices such as they are I have postponed this indefinitely. My Haswell system should keep me happy for at least another couple years.

    • mcarson09
    • 2 years ago

    What i am expecting:

    Newer VR components!! HMDs that have larger FOVs with better tracking and new and improved controllers.

    What I can dream about:

    A 28 core processor with a base clock of 4.0ghz and a boost of 5.0ghz with a TDP of 200 watts.

    • Goofus Maximus
    • 2 years ago

    I had to choose “other”, since not even the light-show-cheese-platter was particularly interesting to me. I think I hopped off the tech train last year at the “good-enough” station…

    • Peldor
    • 2 years ago

    I picked displays, but honestly I just want a bigger home theater TV for a ridiculously low price. There are some things I could do faster with a new computer and zero of them rise to the level of ‘excited’.

    • cmrcmk
    • 2 years ago

    I’m actually most hopeful that several just-in-sight or just-around-the-corner interconnects become common in 2018. [list<] [*<]PCIe 4 in the CPU [/*<][*<]USB-C to become common (e.g. >25% of USB ports on my motherboard/front panel) [/*<][*<]HDMI 2.1 widely available for home theater gear [/*<] [/list<] While these standards are not game-changers for many people, getting them closer to being the de facto in their segment helps the whole industry move forward and also helps my expected 2018 build to be more future proof for its 4+ year lifespan.

      • DancinJack
      • 2 years ago

      Good luck getting any of those in 2018.

    • Kretschmer
    • 2 years ago

    The biggest game changer would be if any of the new battery technologies hits the mainstream. Being able to go for days on a single laptop battery would be nifty.

    ‘Course, what will probably happen is that Apple will use this new tech to make their products SLIMMER AND LIGHTER and all laptops and phones will follow suit. We’ll still get 5-10 hours on a laptop and 10-20 hours on a phone, but hey, they’ll be a bit slimmer!

    • NovusBogus
    • 2 years ago

    Tossup between SLS printers and second-gen personal/desktop CNC. Well, you didn’t specify it had to be PC hardware. 🙂

    On the PC side, probably enterprise notebooks because a quad core U-series silicon with decent integrated graphics opens some interesting options in my eternal quest for a legendary lappy. Dell/HP/Lenovo couldn’t be bothered to put real CPUs in the bulk of the non-workstation line so now Intel will force them to, this is Yuuge(tm).

    • wingless
    • 2 years ago

    I’m looking forward to:

    1) Ryzen+ performance
    2)2nd Gen VR HMDs and games
    3) Optane SSD prices lowering

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    It’s a tough call.

    I’m looking forward to both CPU and GPU developments, but for me the biggest impact on PC usage these days is Windows.

    Microsoft has made many divisive changes over the last couple of years and people are starting to accept cloud-based management, control, freedom and all the downsides that come with it.

    Whether people like the cloud, SaaS and regular subscriptions (or lack of control over how much advertising is shoved in your face) is irrelevant. The revocation of net neutrality laws has massive implications for the whole industry as a whole and people will have to eat what they are served now, regardless of whether they agree with it, or get dragged kicking and screaming against their will.

      • NovusBogus
      • 2 years ago

      Interestingly, my ambivalence about the NN thing comes largely from the tech sector’s own “eat what you’re served” attitude as exhibited by MS, Google et al regarding streaming, SaaS and whatnot. Both camps appear chiefly concerned with making me pay more money for stuff I don’t need, differing only on whether the bill should be direct or indirect. I do wish they’d talk more about the traffic shaping/optimization and peering rules that are at the heart of the dispute, though, as it’s a rather interesting topic at least for the type of nerd that can lose an embarrassing amount of time at places like peeringdb.com and that one site that maps out all the IP addresses.

      • Mr Bill
      • 2 years ago

      Thus my “Other” answer as an OS other than Windows 10.

        • NovusBogus
        • 2 years ago

        Someone could totally take MS to the cleaners if they rolled out a well supported, easy to maintain OS that could run legacy x86 software and had decent enterprise level configuration and management options. Unfortunately I haven’t seen much movement though. The sad thing is that it’s a problem entirely of Microsoft’s own making; if they’d publicly excise the code for telemetry and a few other things from the LTS builds like they so infamously did with the start menu in W8–and make that available to discerning customers ala W7 Ultimate–they’d put a lot of fears to rest, but they won’t do it because blah blah blah Nadella’s Azure-tinted vision.

        Personally, I’m looking at CentOS plus Wine and a Windows 7 VM, but that’s more of a 2019 thing than a 2018 thing. It might go on a laptop this year as an early test though.

          • MOSFET
          • 2 years ago

          [quote<]Unfortunately I haven't seen much movement though.[/quote<] No one has the money to try. Bundling Windows with 100 billion corporate desktops during the initial PC rollout of the 80s was just pure genious.

    • Peter.Parker
    • 2 years ago

    I voted “Other”
    Honestly, I’m most excited about the “Incredibles 2”
    I mean, we’ve been waiting toooooo long for this, amirite?

      • drfish
      • 2 years ago

      Holy crap, yes! So stoked for it, so stoked!

    • Durante
    • 2 years ago

    I’m most excited for improved VR HMDs and other related accessories (ie. tracked interface devices and eye tracking).

    While advances in components are always nice, over the past decade they’ve become very iterative, and that does rob them of excitement. Conversely, VR has the potential to completely redefine the medium.

    I’m admittedly a huge VR fan though, ever since the first Oculus Kickstarter.

    • Kougar
    • 2 years ago

    Need an all the above option. GDDR6 Volta will be good, DDR5 will be nice, refined CPUs and another reduction in prices for many-core chips will be even better. So I will probably go with CPUs, just in anticipation for some cheaper, faster 8 & 10 core options next time around.

    Should also give an honorable mention to quantum computers. [url=https://www.princeton.edu/news/2017/12/11/new-silicon-structure-opens-gate-quantum-computers<]The barriers to it are coming down one-by-one. [/url<]

      • Peter.Parker
      • 2 years ago

      Aaahh, quantum computers…. [pensive stare]
      You absolutely have to love them and hate them at the same time.

        • Ari Atari
        • 2 years ago

        Ahh, would you say… a superposition of love and hate?

          • Peter.Parker
          • 2 years ago

          Well.. yes and no.

    • Blytz
    • 2 years ago

    I want a few things.

    A shift in the somewhat stalled hd prices.
    A slightly higher specced ryzen apu in a laptop (so I can play league on it but let my wife have it)

    Nice plusses would be high refresh 4k screens and gpu’s that can drive it (I think that’s a couple of generations away though)

    • Wren
    • 2 years ago

    I would like to see Ryzen 2000 bring higher clock frequency so that the single-threaded ‘deficit’ gap can be plugged. While I don’t think GloFo’s 12nmLP node will bring the same overall clock ceiling as Intel’s 14nm++, I do believe that 4.5-4.6 GHz will be possible on 8-core chips that will slot into AM4 boards. Ryzen 7 2700 at £300 and OC to 4.5 GHz would be extremely good, especially compared to 8700K.

      • Klimax
      • 2 years ago

      Frequency won’t fix that.

        • Wren
        • 2 years ago

        Even if there are no IPC gains from Ryzen 2000 the extra MHz will help close the gap. Current IPC deficit is around 10-11% per clock. Slightly higher in most games. But some of that can be attributed to games not being optimised for the architecture.

        I will take better longevity (AM4 to be supported till 2020 at least), and higher multi-thread performance over an Intel part on a platform that is going to be dropped next year.

    • Dagwood
    • 2 years ago

    Software (I chose other). The incremental improvements to hardware are not going to felt by the average consumer. In recent memory, it feels like the new technology is just more expensive than the old tech. Getting everybody on board with pay by phone/gadget is going to be a bigger life changing event. I realize you can already do that, but the process is not mainstream enough so my grandma will use it. That is just an example. I think lots of software can be improved and made more secure. That is what “excites” me about the future. Just imagine, some day flash will actually be gone.

    • ET3D
    • 2 years ago

    VR/AR headsets. I’m waiting to see how the Magic Leap glasses turn out, the HTC Vive Focus and the rest of the stuff that’s going to be released. Might not buy one in 2018 either, but it feels like the field is advancing, and I know I’ll end up owning a headset.

    On the PC front, I’m hoping that AMD finally manages to nail down 15W APU’s and small laptops with that get released. So far all that’s been available for Ryzen Mobile is a power guzzling 15″ laptop, and that’s not too promising.

    • Zizy
    • 2 years ago

    I will buy the new CPU at some point in the near future, but well, R5 1600 and i7 8700k are both pretty decent already. Some ST boost for AMD and re-release for Intel aren’t looking that interesting.
    I voted for GPUs. No contest right now, but perhaps hopefully AMD gets out of the hole.
    Memory has always been very boring, no idea how could anyone get excited.
    I would vote for display, but I want 4K@120 freesync screen with OLED, and will survive with my old ZR24w until then. Perhaps TV will get there faster 😛
    Storage could be interesting to a degree. Optane vs Samsung’s TLC used as SLC.

    • HERETIC
    • 2 years ago

    Before I wake up-A great start to 2018 would be a Zen refresh with about 0.4 to 0.5GHz
    speed increase and a BIG AND a 10% increase in IPC.

    On to storage-
    Where most TR readers probably have a 250GB boot SSD and a 1TB game SSD,
    general population is more spinning rust or 120GB SSD and spinning rust.
    Die shrinks have almost killed off 120GB SSD’s-which is a pity as 120GB boot plus
    spinning rust suits most needs.
    A 120GB SSD with 10GB Optane built in with a sweet controller could solve that problem.
    I originally thought this would be nice if incorporated on MB,but that’s probably
    not practical. Perhaps a M2 as a optional extra with MB.Reasons-cost.
    Costing on a typical $60 SSD is $20 manufacturing,$20 markup and $20 retailer markup.
    MB maker buying in bulk could possibly offer as optional extra for $30 to $40.
    I can wake up now………………………………….

    Anyone here subscribe to SA? I’d love to know what Charlie knows about Intel’s 10nm…

    • Kretschmer
    • 2 years ago

    I would love to trade in my 100Hz 3440×1440 display for a 2560×1440 GSync ULMB display that runs at 200Hz. GPUs with significantly more oomph would be icing on the cake.

      • cmrcmk
      • 2 years ago

      I’m thinking about switching from a 16:9 monitor to a 21:9 model. It sounds like you’re wanting to move the other way. Could you share why you want a 16:9 over a 21:9?

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        Like Kretschmer, I’ve dabbled with a couple of 21:9 displays and gone back to a better 16:9 option.

        21:9 content on a 21:9 display is amazing, but the vast majority of the time you’re missing content on a 21:9 or else you’re suffering black bars that turn your 34″ monitor into a 27″ monitor with horrible bezels to the side.

        • Kretschmer
        • 2 years ago

        21:9 (UWS) only gets you about 30% more pixels for at least 50% more budget. It’s somewhat more immersive in games and great for productivity work, but:
        -Your framerates will always be 26% lower with the same card due to driving all those extra pixels. So that 100FPS GPU becomes a 74FPS GPU. With refresh rates getting higher, you really want to get your FPS up as high as possible.
        -Monitor technologies are slower to migrate to the UWS format, and command a larger premium when they do. For example, the best 34″ gaming screens in 2017 are still missing the ULMB feature
        -UWS panels are always slower in response time than their smaller brethren, which adds motion blur. See: [url<]http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/images/dell_alienware_aw3418dw/comparison_6.jpg[/url<] -There is a dearth of 21:9 native content. Most games now support the format (except for Overwatch and in-game cutscenes of several titles). But paid streaming sites are 99% 16:9, YouTube is 16:9, etc. So you're not getting to use all that space for most media content. -For productivity, 2x27" 1440P is 50% more space for a fraction of the budget (27" gaming screen + 27" 60Hz IPS). After experiencing ULMB, I regret paying more for a screen that lacks that feature and the really high refresh rates. Depending on how expensive HDR ULMB screens are this year, I may try and sell my X34 for a smaller screen with a better featureset and slap a cheap 27" monitor next to it for great productivity.

    • the
    • 2 years ago

    CPU and GPU news and releases had a pretty busy year in 2017 but I honestly don’t see a repeat in 2018. SkyLake based Xeon-D’s are coming as Cannon Lake and Cascade Lake but none of these are big game changers. AMD has Zen+ which could be interesting if they can increase clocks and there is Raven Ridge on desktop which is interesting. Zen 2 looks to be a 2019 part more and more but that’s OK. There of course is the radical Kaby Lake G which makes me question if hell has frozen over but that I consider that 2017 news. GPU side will see consumer Volta but that won’t be ready until GDDR6 is ready for prime time which I don’t see until 2018Q2 at the earliest. 12 nm FinFET will see a refresh on the GPU side later in the year but I’m not seeing much on the architectural side that makes things a radical departure. I do see 2019 making CPU and GPUs interesting again per released roadmaps.

    Storage should be shifting more toward M.2 and I hope to see an increase in U.2 drives on the market. Optane is out, barely it feels like, but there is still the Optane DIMMs for Cascade Lake that could be real game changer once software catches up a bit. I know a few big data guys that are drooling at the idea of being able to handle their workloads entirely ‘in memory’ even if the Optane memory is a magnitude slower than conventional DRAM. A sanity check needs to be had if improvements in algorithm efficiencies can offset the theoretical performance loss.

    Displays have my eye right now. HDMI 2.1 has been formalized and I hope to see the first generation of displays using it at CES next week. Samsung micro-LCDs look neat as a replacement for LED tiles for large format displays and look to hit the pixel pitch comparable to large HDTVs. 5K and 8K displays will become more common place too as will DP 1.3/1.4. Speaking of DP 1.3, there is the expectation that CannonLake will pick this up alongside variable refresh support. I also see the arrival of new Thunderbolt controllers that’ll remain at 40 Gbit bandwidth but be able to encapsulate a single DP 1.3 for displays and pass through (currently TB3 does so using two DP 1.2 streams).

    The real thing I’m looking forward to is what Apple does with the Mac Pro. They announced that they made a mistake with the current design and were working on something better. If they don’t screw this up, there maybe hope for the Mac after all. Bonus if Apple uses RGB LED tempered-glass cheese platters to make it distinctly different than the classic tower Mac Pro. Otherwise Cupertino needs to slide into the ocean.

    • blastdoor
    • 2 years ago

    I think solid state batteries and autonomous vehicles are the most exciting things coming down the pike, but 2018 might not be the year for either.

    • Ummagumma
    • 2 years ago

    What? No “cheese” category in this poll?

      • Redocbew
      • 2 years ago

      There’s RGB LED tempered glass cheese platters.

      I would have voted for that, but only if the platter comes with an app for my smart phone.

      • albundy
      • 2 years ago

      what, you dont see it? it’s right there! awww, you missed it, man!

    • sircharles32
    • 2 years ago

    I’d add another category: “Prices returning to where they were, prior to all the insanity of anything to do with memory (video/RAM/Flash)”

    Until that takes place, I’m forced to the sidelines.

      • Pancake
      • 2 years ago

      I’m also standing on the outside looking in. Can’t afford to meaningfully upgrade my i5-3570 rig which currently has 32GB and 1TB SSD. A meaningful upgrade would be a Ryzen 1800 or i7-8700 (although an i5-8400 is looking very tempting) but with 64GB of the cheapest value RAM costing over $1000 dollaroos and 2x1TB SSD over $1200 I can’t justify it. The madness has to end.

      • mcarson09
      • 2 years ago

      You can get good prices on ram if you know where to look.

      • rudimentary_lathe
      • 2 years ago

      Agreed. Add in the crappy CAD dollar and it’s a terrible time to upgrade for me. Saving my duckets for better days.

    • tsk
    • 2 years ago

    GPUs are always more exciting than CPUs. It’s gonna be interesting to see if AMD can make some serious improvements to perf/watt with Navi, although we’ll probably have to wait til Q4’18 to find out.

    • CScottG
    • 2 years ago

    What I’d like from Computer/Software tech in 2018:

    1. Oculus and Vive 2nd Gen (..in particular I’m looking for good text legibility and a much wider field of view.)
    2. Fusion 360 with VR support.
    3. Volta (Ti).
    4. Optane DIMM.
    5. Intel w/ TICK & TOCK.

    • blargh4
    • 2 years ago

    The 4K + 144hz GSync + IPS + HDR with full-array backlighting monitors that are supposedly coming out this year (like the Asus PG27UQ) seem to tick almost all the boxes for me, though the rumors of >$2000 price points are tempering my excitement.

    Also curious to see what Intel’s been cooking up with Ice Lake, since I hear it’ll be their first major microarchitecture redesign since Skylake, but I’m not expecting any miraculous improvements in single-core throughput.

    • odizzido
    • 2 years ago

    Voted for CPUs because I know that’s coming out in 2018. For monitors I am waiting for some adaptive sync 120+hz OLED one so yeah that’s not happening at my price range in 2018

    • dragontamer5788
    • 2 years ago

    Hmm, CPUs are in a good spot right now, and I don’t see much improvement on the horizon. Ice Lake’s big advantage seems to be AVX-512, and not any particular architectural change.

    GPUs are in a good spot: Volta (even if only in the Titan) has dropped for consumers, Vega56 / 64 are going to be the big chips in the near term. Beyond that, GPUs probably won’t get much better in 1h 2018. I don’t see any news about cheaper Volta chips (and even then, those chips won’t have Tensor cores or any of the stuff that made the Titan exciting). So its all up to AMD’s Navi architecture to excite me next year… I guess.

    RAM similarly is probably going to be extremely costly through 1H 2018, as there’s no end to the current DDR4 shortage (not until Samsung’s new fab-lab comes into play in 2H 2018 anyway). DDR5 is a long-ways away, I don’t see any CPU supporting it in 2018. GDDR6 is cool I guess? But mentally I consider that more of a GPU tech for some reason.

    Hard Drives / Storage has some exciting things going on, but Hard Drives are kind of a boring technology for some reason. Its hard for me to be excited about them. NAND Flash has similar supply issues, and its hard to be excited about the MLC -> TLC transition. We’re technically getting worse / cheaper tech here (at a better price). So… its not very exciting IMO.

    Frankly, 2018 currently looks like a boring year. If I had to pick a tech as the “most interesting”, I guess CPUs because of Ice Lake / Ryzen 2. But Coffee Lake / Ryzen were such huge jumps (Ryzen getting good single-core performance finally, and Coffee Lake now offering 6-cores on the cheap) that I’m not sure that there’s anything in 2018 that would impress me as much.

    • Mr Bill
    • 2 years ago

    I could say CPU since I’m running an X6 1100T and a step up to a Zen would be noticable. GPU might be a good option since I’m running an XFX HD 7870. But I’m gonna go with “other”. Its time I upgraded my OS from Win XP64 to something open and robust; maybe a Linux.

      • Veerappan
      • 2 years ago

      I went from a X6 1055T to a Zen R7 1700 (last spring) and upgraded my HD7850 1GB to a RX 580 8GB (this fall).

      The CPU/motherboard upgrade was a night and day difference for what I do with my machine (heavy compilation loads in Linux), whereas the RX 580 was just a nice-to-have and lets me get away from some GCN 1.0 hardware bugs that were affecting my software development hobbies.

      I’d wait just a hair longer and see what the Zen v2 chips end up looking like. Zen v1 is nice, but there could be some nice incremental improvements around the corner.

      Myself: I’m looking forward to the perfect 13-14″ Raven Ridge laptop. 768p-1080p IPS, LED backlit, dual-channel RAM, 250-500GB SSD, reasonable battery life (5+ hours), and non-sucky build quality. The Lenovo looked perfect until it ended up being single-channel.

        • dragontamer5788
        • 2 years ago

        [quote<] Myself: I'm looking forward to the perfect 13-14" Raven Ridge laptop. 768p-1080p IPS, LED backlit, dual-channel RAM, 250-500GB SSD, reasonable battery life (5+ hours), and non-sucky build quality. The Lenovo looked perfect until it ended up being single-channel.[/quote<] The HP x360 Laptop has all of that, although the IPS screen has a relatively low sRGB metric. You do need to get the "custom" HP laptop to get an SSD. I don't have good experience with the HP Store, but the laptop uses Torx 5 screws, so its actually pretty easy to open up and replace the hard drive with M.2 SSD (yes, there's an M.2 PCIe slot!). A few hours on the weekend will get you upgraded to good specs. But yeah, HP Laptop is around 5 hours of battery life. And that's considered "bad" today. You will easily find a laptop with more than 5-hours as they come out (ie: the ones without touchscreens or stylus support)

          • Pancake
          • 2 years ago

          Except the x360 is 15.6″, craptastic and to quote this august website:

          “The Envy x360 falls short in enough places that I’d have a hard time justifying its price tag.”

          5hrs is awful today. That’s progress for you.

        • dragosmp
        • 2 years ago

        +1 for a nice 1080p gaming ultrabook. I’d up that to 8h+ battery life, for no other reason that many lappies do 5h when new and drop to 3h a few months down the road.
        /waiting for Asus or Acer to come up with a Vivobook/Spire alternative based on RR

    • The Egg
    • 2 years ago

    I’m still waiting for the right display to come around. I’ll take a 32″ IPS/VA panel at 2560×1440 with full array backlighting, 144hz or better, HDR600 or better, and if I could wish on a unicorn’s tail, support for both Freesync 2 and the upcoming G-Sync HDR standard at $800 or less.

    ….I probably would’ve already jumped for that Samsung Freesync 2 model if Vega 56 had been available at a reasonable price.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 2 years ago

      Radeon RX Vega56 (and 64) were actually available for less than their $400 (and $500) MSRP at the beginning of November. Since then, the miners have driven the price through the roof. 🙁

    • moose17145
    • 2 years ago

    Was finally forced to purchase a new monitor (old one shelled out finally).

    But… it is paired with my R9 290… which, although a very good card, is starting to get a little long in the tooth, as such “Graphics Cards” has my vote for this pole, simply due to what I am (hopefully) soon to be in the market for.

    With any luck AMD will release something good so that I can keep using the freesync capabilities of my new monitor.

    • Freon
    • 2 years ago

    Seems unlikely we’ll have much going on in the CPU/GPU market. Nvidia and Intel continue to dominate poor AMD, despite the brief spot of daylight on the CPU side before Intel countered. This only seems to have annoyed the demon.

    I suppose NV will finally roll out a sequel to their existing Pascal lineup, but I’m not expecting much of a performance/value increase.

    Zen 2.0 might be interesting, but I don’t expect they’ll catch back up with another 8 core product to Intel’s 6 core desktop parts.

    Memory just needs a price recovery. SSDs can always get cheaper. Neither are likely to produce innovations with significant impact.

    Therefore, I’m hopeful for monitor-grade low-persistence OLEDs and HDR, or perhaps just another increment on existing VA/IPS/TN panels to reduce the jungle of trade offs we suffer based on panel choice. Or even just wider adoption of HDR on existing panels. I’d care more for an increment here than with a slight boost in memory or SSD speeds.

      • EndlessWaves
      • 2 years ago

      I’d hardly say nVidia dominates AMD. With Freesync AMD hold all the cards in the mainstream, there’s little reason to buy a GTX 1050 or 1060 unless you’re gaming on a TV or similar display that’ll never get it.

        • Kretschmer
        • 2 years ago

        You either pay a premium for GSync or pay a premium on AMD GPUs bid up by cryptominers. The Nvidia stuff is technically better, so you might as well go with that.

          • Welch
          • 2 years ago

          True, for now… A monitor purchase is long term, much longer than a GPU. I got a FreeSync monitor and am still using a non-freesync card. Once prices normalize I have no reason to believe AMDs card are going to be priced beyond the difference of a GSync monitor + Nvidia card.

          Temporary problem IMHO.

        • renz496
        • 2 years ago

        That’s what some people think until they see real data.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 2 years ago

    Waiting for larger 4K monitors to get some of that awesome adaptive sync tech.

    • TwoEars
    • 2 years ago

    I’d like to see Asus release those damn HDR monitors sometime soon.

    • not@home
    • 2 years ago

    I will need to replace my 7870 soon, so I will be following graphic cards closely. But, I really want to see what AMD does with Ryzen 2. I hope they really up their game. We need the competition. Intel finally put more cores and threads in their mobile lineup with their latest generation. This is good.

      • DancinJack
      • 2 years ago

      And the desktop…

        • thecoldanddarkone
        • 2 years ago

        More on the desktop than laptop. Quad laptops w hyper threading existed at the 1k mark from 2011 (maybe 2012). Yes, quad u processors now exist but saying quad laptops were not common place is pushing it.

        I have an hp dv6 6138nr that I’m passing off to my dad from my brother. 1080p, 2670qm, 8 gigs of memory, 1tb hd (default config replaced with an ssd now).

    • Pagey
    • 2 years ago

    I’m looking forward to advances in display technology, personally. It’s amazing, to me at least, at how quick the “4K” (UHD) spec has taken off, relative to other consumer video formats. There are still bugs to work out, of course, but it really seems like “the industry” have gotten themselves together/better organized on this format. I think it will be nice when all standard/affordable displays, regardless of panel size, offer things like UHD resolution, 10-bit panels for wider color gamuts, and support for at least HDR 10. I am also hoping that things like Quantum Dot technologies and micro LED-based displays become more affordable and mainstream. It still blows my mind that in my lifetime, we’ve gone from 480i broadcast/analog to something like UHD-BD that offers the visual and audio quality that rivals, arguably, a 2K Digital Cinema setup on a $20 or $25 disc that fits in the palm of my hand.

      • DancinJack
      • 2 years ago

      To be fair, most broadcast content is still 1080i and p at max AFAIK. We definitely need more content coming from TV providers (and the internet based ones too). Not everyone owns or even wants BluRays.

        • Pagey
        • 2 years ago

        Agreed. But I do think that most content creators/providers, especially on the film/TV series side of things, are moving towards 4K/UHD/HDR streaming of content. Though I am a “you’ll pry my physical media from my cold, dead hands” kinda guy, I think with the amount of “4K” streaming that will be available, this might help nudge more displays (not just traditional TVs, per se) towards the standards I mentioned above.

          • DancinJack
          • 2 years ago

          Yeah, unfortunately more and more internet providers are implementing monthly data caps. 🙁
          1TB of data can go pretty quickly when you’re streaming 4K HDR TV shows. Hopefully someone can find some better solutions to compression that doesn’t make things look awful.

            • Pagey
            • 2 years ago

            Indeed. It just goes to show that the maturity of the codec and the particular encoder can make a big difference. When HEVC/h.265 became “mainstream,” essentially, the promised “twice as efficient at the same bandwidth” on paper translated to more like a 30-40% value rather than a 50% value. Now, as with any compression algorithm, it will mature over time and become more efficient, but I think we are still a few years out on that. I am, however, impressed with just how optimized AVC/h.264 are, now. Handbrake, with a little knowledge and tweaking, can produce some VERY good looking transcodes at bitrates you’d think twice about.

      • Spyrano
      • 2 years ago

      Also looking forward to Ultrawide, G-Sync, Quantum Dot, and HDR all in the same monitor.

      [url<]http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/news_archive/38.htm#auo_roadmap_oct17[/url<]

        • Neutronbeam
        • 2 years ago

        At an affordable price…been pricing monitors and G-Sync seems to be the spoiler; adds about $200; all those other features seem to be costing less.

      • EndlessWaves
      • 2 years ago

      Quickly? HiDPI screens have taken ages. IBM launched the 3840×2400 T221 over fifteen years ago now, and Microsoft have been pushing resolution independent interfaces in .NET since at least 2006.

      If Apple hasn’t forced the issue for Mac OS with HiDPI (Retina) screens as standard it might not be happening even now.

      Still, it’s at least happened faster than wide gamut screens, which still have terrible support. That one really puzzles me, it seems like it’s a lot easier to provide the information about which colour space a piece of content uses than to design a resolution-independent interface.

        • Pagey
        • 2 years ago

        I mean (relatively) quickly in the consumer video format. If you look, for example, at the birthing pains DVD had, it seems that the transition from HD (720p)/Full HD (1080p) and Blu-ray to 4K/UHD was much faster across the board.

        I don’t program, so I am not familiar with the progression of the technology from a PC/software standpoint. I consume most of my consumer video content on my PC simply because it provides me the most flexibility/privacy, especially when compared to trying to watch something on the living room TV!

      • EndlessWaves
      • 2 years ago

      I’m hoping HDR10 quickly gets marginalised on PC. HLG is looking like a much more practical standard as it continues to use relative brightness values suitable for a range of lighting conditions instead the absolute brightness values HDR10 uses.

      Of course screen manufacturers can provide functions to shift the brightness range from the correct values but it’s just more sensible to have it defined in the standard to begin with than differing between screens.

      • moose17145
      • 2 years ago

      You find going from 480i broadcast to 4k impressive?

      Then imagine how my grandmother and several others like her must feel as they are coming up on the tail end of their lives. Started life in an era where the car was really only just beginning to truly revolutionize the country where the interstate system didn’t even exist yet. Lived through the depression and saw the invention of the atomic bomb which ended a world war. Witnessed man land on the moon, and now today it is not uncommon to see us landing the very rockets that brought us to the edge of space on a tiny little barge in the middle of the ocean so it can take us back up to the edge of space yet again.
      And all the while a computer revolution (which she cannot even begin to wrap her head around) had sprung up around her that changed the way we do literally almost everything.

      She started off in a time where the horse and buggy was still not an uncommon thing… and now we are where we are today… when I think about that… I would find the jump to even 16k to be very “meh” in the most krogoth of senses. I truly hope in my lifetime I get to see things more impressive than a resolution bump in video formats…

        • Pagey
        • 2 years ago

        I find it impressive in the context I was discussing: consumer video formats. Do I consider it as impressive as splitting the atom or landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to Earth? LOL, of course not! 🙂

    • Duct Tape Dude
    • 2 years ago

    It’s time for storage to evolve again. We’ve been stuck at the same cost per gigabyte or max capacity for awhile now in NAND and platters, and HAMR/SMR/dual-armatures/Optane/etc have been explored in 2017. It’s time they mature and refine themselves into viable tech for the masses in 2018.

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 2 years ago

    Let’s start a poll to find out what goty is hurt when anyone says AMD is not competitive.

    1. Fan boi
    2. Romantically involved with CPU
    3. Too poor for Intel
    4. Stuck in the past
    5. Idealistic

    You can pick all 5 if you choose. I did.

      • ermo
      • 2 years ago

      Poor form.

      • Wren
      • 2 years ago

      AMD *is* competitive, though. S/he is simply stating a fact. Let’s not forget that the comments s/he was replying to are distinctly Intel-fanboy like.

        • Kougar
        • 2 years ago

        Regardless of the factuality of the comment there is no need to feed the trolls, that’s all posts like these are good for.

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      Not sure why people don’t think AMD is competing with Intel.

      I’m still running Intel chips in my personal machines (no reason to replace them just yet) but at work the Ryzen7 chips have been running rings around Intel’s Kaby and Broadwell-E options, whilst for consumer desktop use the Ryzen5 1600 has made everything prior to Kaby Lake pointless, and even for gaming, only the 7700K has any appeal with Ryzen and CoffeeLake in the picture.

      For the majority of 2017, you had to be both a gamer and willing to pay for i7 for any Intel purchase to be the best bang for your buck. In the sub-$300 market segment, AMD has had the best CPUs since May.

        • HERETIC
        • 2 years ago

        Until you get to the sub-$100 Pentiums rule supreme there.

    • Krogoth
    • 2 years ago

    Heated competition for the CPU market that hasn’t been seen since 2005-2006.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 2 years ago

      at least DragonDaddyBear can blame his incoherency on his phone’s keyboard

    • DrDominodog51
    • 2 years ago

    I’ve lost nearly all excitement or even interest in new hardware at this point. If I had to choose something, I would say I’m most excited for the ASRock Z390 OC Formula though.

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    It’s not always the most popular but I expect the most movement in storage with Optane expanding and the launch of Z-NAND assuming Samsung gets it out the door.

      • ermo
      • 2 years ago

      Yeah, I agree that Optane might well be the dark horse in the tech race these days. We haven’t really seen its full potential yet.

        • Krogoth
        • 2 years ago

        Optane is meant to be a cost-effective alternative to high-density LRDIMMs.

        It doesn’t make sense for workstations and normal desktop/laptop systems since they aren’t bounded by the current crop of standard M.2 NVMe media.

      • Krogoth
      • 2 years ago

      Storage isn’t going to be that exciting aside from lower GB/$$$$ ratio.

    • ChacoKevy
    • 2 years ago

    Are we calling VR a peripheral, and therefore out-of-scope of this poll?

      • caconym
      • 2 years ago

      I’ve been holding off on VR until inside-out tracking can functionally match what the Oculus and Vive provide, and based on early reviews of some of the new “Mixed Reality” headsets, we might actually be at that point now. Or if not now, then very soon. So that’s exciting. I thought it would take longer.

    • NTMBK
    • 2 years ago

    I’m excited for the fourth rebrand of Skylake.

      • Neutronbeam
      • 2 years ago

      “Skylake IV: The Phantom Enhancement”?

      • Wirko
      • 2 years ago

      + + + + + + + ++ +
      + ++ 14nm++++ + + +
      + + + + + + ++ ++ +

        • Mr Bill
        • 2 years ago

        Skylake XIVnm

      • psuedonymous
      • 2 years ago

      Skylake 4? Sandy Bridge 7? Core 13? P19? As long as you ignore enough architecture changes, you can give it any epithet you want!

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 2 years ago

    I’m hoping that ssds come down in price.

    Least excited category is memory. I doubt the manufactures feel like lowering prices.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 2 years ago

      love your autocorrects lol

        • drfish
        • 2 years ago

        Ha, proof before you post, folks. 🙂

        • DragonDaddyBear
        • 2 years ago

        One should not post while parenting.

        Side thought, I’m done with the craptastc Samsung keyboard. It does that to me all the time. Why does Samsung clone features of Google and find a way to make all of them worse?

          • jihadjoe
          • 2 years ago

          I’m amazed they continue to spend time and money re-inventing the wheel on basic Android features when they could have better phones by doing [u<]less[/u<] work on the software side.

            • Chrispy_
            • 2 years ago

            I’ve come to the conclusion that even after attempting to use the S2, S3, S4, S5, S6, S7 and Note8 that Samsung’s OS and ‘improvements’ are best avoided. It’s a shame you can’t always find clean ‘stock’ android ROMs anymore, but there’s always Cyanogen (LineageOS) at least…

          • Chrispy_
          • 2 years ago

          Buy Swype for a couple of dollars. Move it between phones, including your custom dictionary. Cannot recommend highly enough!

    • Growler
    • 2 years ago

    I’d like to know if nVidia is planning on releasing the Pascal successor in the near future, but I’m guessing the lack of previews so far means that it’s still going to be a while.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 2 years ago

      End if March announcement at gtc and available April/May.

      • renz496
      • 2 years ago

      nvidia usually did not “preview” their hardware like AMD did. i still remember back in 2016 people said that nvidia not showing or talking about pascal at CES 2016 is a sign of trouble for pascal. sometimes they just drop the bomb out of nowhere.

    • Firestarter
    • 2 years ago

    CPUs for me. I want to see what AMD is cooking up and I want to see Intel’s reaction, the competition there is more exciting than the GPU space IMO

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