Rumor: AMD planning 400-series chipsets with PCIe 3.0 connectivity

While AMD's Ryzen processors generally chat directly with graphics cards and NVMe storage devices over 8 GT/s PCIe 3.0 lanes, peripherals attached through existing 300-series chipsets are limited to the bandwidth offered by PCIe 2.0 lanes. The company's upcoming 400-series chipsets could bring PCIe 3.0 capabilities to all slots of future Ryzen motherboards, according to recent updates in the PCI-SIG Integrator's List.

As a refresher, AMD's Ryzen chips communicate directly with storage devices over four dedicated PCIe 3.0 lanes, with another 16 top-speed lanes set out for one or two graphics cards. Another four PCIe 3.0 lanes attach the chipset to the CPU. All chatter between the chipset and any other PCIe devices is then of the 5 GT/s PCIe 2.0 variety. AMD's current top-of-the-line mainstream desktop chipset, the X370, has up to eight PCIe 2.0 lanes.

For just one possibility, this rumored change likely opens the door for future motherboards with two PCIe 3.0 x4 M.2 slots: one wired directly to the CPU and the other connected to the chipset. It's not clear whether the maximum number of PCIe lanes will increase along with the speed upgrade, however, a change that would make 400-series chipsets potentially more competitive with the maximum of 24 flexible PCIe 3.0 lanes available from Intel's Z370 chipset.

The "upcoming changes" section of HWinfo's HWinfo32 and HWinfo64 5.70 release notes add further smoke to the fire around AMD's 400-series chipsets. AMD has offered no information at all on the subject so far, however. We'd guess the 400-series chipsets will likely be released around the same time as the company's second-generation Ryzen CPUs sometime next year, if such a release is in the works to begin with.

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    Well neat! I’ve always thought the mainstream Ryzen platform is kinda half baked. Like AMD settled for ‘just enough’ connectivity features. Not that that’s a bad thing, but it kinda watered down an exciting new CPU launch.

    • msroadkill612
    • 2 years ago

    All good, but the most exciting recent step toward super computing for all, has been raid 0 nvme – which is clearly pointless on a 4x pcie3 lane total bandwidth chipset from intel OR amd.

    An 8x pcie3 lane chipset, tho not ideal, should yield almost full performance for a raid 0 pair at least. Still, 8x pcie3 lane chipset is a big improvement & seems long overdue, especially for ~well endowed 64 lane TR4.

      • Puiucs
      • 2 years ago

      Why do you even need that kind of performance on a mainstream PC? There are no applications that take advantage of that besides workloads that are generally reserved for workstations/servers.

    • jts888
    • 2 years ago

    This is good to know, but like a lot of folks, I care about 400-series chipset news only inasmuch as it’s a proxy for Ryzen+/Pinnacle Ridge release date info.

    A single x16 graphics card connected directly to the CPU plus a x4 m.2 NVMe drive is enough high-throughput peripheral connectivity for me, and I am by no means limited by SATA or USB port counts.

    • swaaye
    • 2 years ago

    Well neat. For a moment I thought Ryzen systems had only PCIe 2.0.

      • Prestige Worldwide
      • 2 years ago

      I first read that they only had USB 2.0

      o_0

        • NTMBK
        • 2 years ago

        I first read that they only had DDR2

        0_0

          • Wirko
          • 2 years ago

          You all read it fast but I read it faster … as PS/2.

            • Redocbew
            • 2 years ago

            So did I, on my machine running OS/2.

            • Blytz
            • 2 years ago

            I had something witty but I was 2 late to the party

    • the
    • 2 years ago

    The real news will be when PCIe 4.0 starts hitting chipsets late next year/early 2019.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 2 years ago

      Can you elaborate, bro?

      • tsk
      • 2 years ago

      Didn’t you get the memo?
      We’re going straight to PCIe 5.0 on consumer devices.

        • jts888
        • 2 years ago

        PCIe 5.0 exists at this stage almost solely for enterprise folks wanting 200/400 Gb NICs and 16 GB/s u.2 NVMe drives. ~16 Gb PHYs for PCIe 4.0 are reasonably sane to implement, but ~33 Gb PHYs will be big, hot, and costly for the near term.

        • psuedonymous
        • 2 years ago

        Depends on how hard signal routing for 5.0 is. 4.0 is at least meetable (or already met) with current implementations, e.g. 3M’s flex riser. 5.0 has some crazy harsh signal integrity requirements.

    • ClickClick5
    • 2 years ago

    Well neat! If I could boot past agesa 1.0.0.7, I would like that!

      • albundy
      • 2 years ago

      yup. looks like the updates are dead. seems like thats it for ryzen 1. no surprise with the lack of support from AMD.

        • Welch
        • 2 years ago

        Is this just assumed or do you have some serious info about it not being supported? I mean the 1.0.0.7 released around Nov, so we aren’t talking about ancient history. If we don’t see a new update out sometime around Jan/Feb then I’d think they are sleeping at the wheel.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 2 years ago

          Once things are working where they should be why does firmware even need updated? I think the firmware is at a point where there’s little else to extract.

          Edit: I fully expect that the next formate update is for Raven Ridge. And I’m fine without flashing my BIOS once a month.

      • anotherengineer
      • 2 years ago

      1.0.7.2a
      [url<]http://www.gigabyte.us/Motherboard/GA-AX370-Gaming-K3-rev-10#support-dl[/url<] so previous bios is better??

        • ClickClick5
        • 2 years ago

        !.0.7.2 has been bricking boards it seems. In my case, it also nuked the backup bios, so I can’t even try to reflash. I would stay on F5 for now.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This