Apple addresses iPhone slowdown fiasco with $29 battery replacements

Over the past few days, there's been a furor regarding the performance of some aging iPhones on the popular Geekbench benchmark under iOS 10.2.1 and newer. Testing by a number of users on Reddit and by Geekbench maker Primate Labs itself revealed that some iPhones were putting up lower single-core Geekbench scores than others with the newer software, leading to outraged iPhone owners and a wide range of inflammatory headlines.

Apple responded to the controversy by acknowledging that recent versions of iOS "smooth out" peak power demands to prevent the annoying sudden shutdowns that have plagued some iPhone owners, but that explanation alone apparently didn't cut it. The company published a letter to customers today that addresses the controversy and outlines some of the reasons for the lowered performance.

As the original post on Reddit suggested, Apple says the performance drop is related to the chemical aging of lithium-ion batteries over their lifetimes. On top of the reasonably common knowledge that older batteries don't run devices for as long as their newer counteparts, Apple adds that aged batteries also don't provide as much peak power to devices, especially in low states of charge. When the SoC inside demands lots of juice (as it might in a peaky load like Geekbench), a compromised battery might not be able to supply enough power, leading to a sudden shutdown.

To avoid these sudden blackouts, Apple changed the way iOS power management works in version 10.2.1 in a way that "dynamically manages the maximum performance of some system components when needed to avoid a shutdown." In short, the device slows down during high transient loads. The company concedes that these power-management provisions can lead to slower app launches and other reductions in performance, though it notes that customers were happy with the reduction in unexpected shutdowns that the new iOS version offered.

Although Apple notes that "of course" a battery replacement would return older iPhones to peak performance, that knowledge was apparently not nearly as obvious to the general public as it was to company insiders. Many users could justifiably have upgraded their slowing iPhones in a begrudging effort to remedy what they may have seen as inexplicable performance losses with age when a simple battery replacement (for $79 from Apple) would have extended the useful life of their devices.

Apple is taking several steps to respond to the controversy these revelations have created. For one, it'll cut $50 from the price of its first-party battery replacement services next month for some phones. Battery replacements for iPhone 6 and newer devices will cost $29 thereafter and will be available at that price through the end of 2018. The company is also working on a software update that will reveal more details of the condition of a device's battery so that iDevice owners can judge whether their batteries are causing performance slowdowns. Apple also vaguely notes that it's always working on ways of improving power-management behavior as devices age.

Although we haven't covered this issue prior to Apple's announcement today, we have been following it (and I'm glad my initial understanding of the problem was apparently correct). The company's response should put to bed the idea that it intentionally slows down devices to spur upgrades to newer iPhones, although one could reasonably conclude that intent doesn't matter if users ultimately felt that a hardware upgrade was necessary after the iOS 10.2.1 update. My feeling is that Apple will be more careful to communicate the full scope of changes like this power-management adjustment in the future, even if they result in mostly-beneficial behavior like fewer sudden shutdowns. We'll see whether that's the case when the next Apple scandal inevitably rolls around.

Comments closed
    • Kretschmer
    • 2 years ago

    Again, it’s incredibly unethical to “patch” the battery degradation impact instead of informing users of the issue and giving them the option to pay for a battery replacement or use a slower device.

    • tootercomputer
    • 2 years ago

    I was in Best Buy picking up a TV that my wife had purchased for me for Xmas (the LG Oled 55″, OMG what a product) and needless to say I was anxious to pick it up. There was some confusion in the order, and I called my wife on my cell and then handed it to the salesman (who I believe was trying to do the right thing), and without asking me, he put my phone into speaker mode, tried to talk to my wife, and then handed it back.

    I never gave him permission to change the setting on my phone. If he had asked, I would have been fine with it. It was really no big deal, but it bothered me because he did not ask my permission. That is a subtle lack of respect. And I think that is what Apple has done big time. They messed with lots of people’s machines, and yeah, maybe licensing rights somehow allow them to do this, but changing people’s phones without their permission and in this instance, slowing down the phones, that’s a lot of disrespect. Rodney Dangerfield would have had fun with this one.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 2 years ago

    Apple has opened up the lower-priced battery replacement program a few days early:

    [url<]https://techcrunch.com/2017/12/30/apples-29-iphone-battery-replacements-are-available-starting-today/[/url<]

    • HERETIC
    • 2 years ago

    The real BIG question is-Are the replacement batteries cheap and nasty like the originals??
    You’d think with the price apple charges for phones you’d get a Panasonic or similar quality.

    • Welch
    • 2 years ago

    This is going to be bad…. At that price way more people are going to send their phone in for new batteries. It’s going to be backed up like a son of a gun.

    • DPete27
    • 2 years ago

    Will a battery replacement really fix the problem? I thought the OS just detected that the phone was an older version and slowed it down, regardless of battery health.

      • davidbowser
      • 2 years ago

      I would normally assume you are joking, but considering how bad/misinformed the reaction (and people’s comments) have been, I am not sure.

      tl/dr – Apple throttled the phones when iOS detected battery degradation. LOTS of people were confusing correlation with causation, and then it went all torch and pitchforks.

      Apple F-ed this up SOOO bad. The thing that really chaps my ass is that [b<]iOS DOES HAVE A BAD BATTERY ALERT MESSAGE![/b<] I just replaced the battery ($75) in my daughter's phone a few weeks ago because she got the message and it came back even after I did a device wipe. At least now I have a reasonable price to take the other phones in for battery replacement.

        • DPete27
        • 2 years ago

        It was an honest question. I haven’t dove into the details too much since I don’t own an iPhone, but I was talking to my sister-in-law over Christmas about this and she said her phone is suffering this problem. I figured some TR reader could fill me in instead of having to weed through the FUD.

        I just wanted to make sure this wasn’t just Apple taking advantage of the situation to sell battery replacements.

        Thanks for your help.

          • End User
          • 2 years ago

          Read Jeff’s article.

          • jihadjoe
          • 2 years ago

          The phones go back to full speed after replacing the battery.

        • Bauxite
        • 2 years ago

        Wow, $75, highway robbery. I can get good Li-Po with far more capacity for that.

          • trackerben
          • 2 years ago

          OEM battery and service for $29, online or at a city shop? Where is that?

            • davidbowser
            • 2 years ago

            Not to be completely cynical, but Apple kinda HAD to make the price lower than the knock-offs this time. I would bet good money that Apple set the price ($29) at their breakeven. If they don’t, then the customers will end up at 3rd party phone shops getting it done on the cheap.

            The little phone kiosk in my local mall sits about 30 feet away from the Apple store and they do most of their business on phone cases and screen repairs. They, and every other shop like it, were probably salivating at the thought of getting $50 per phone battery replaced.

    • barich
    • 2 years ago

    Why are there not widespread reports about sudden shutdowns on older iPhones and (most) Android phones? HTC and Moto don’t throttle their devices due to age/battery capacity.

    To me this says that they underspecced the battery/power delivery circuitry and are trying to work around the problem they caused by throttling the device (and now offering less expensive replacement batteries which, I suspect, they’re still profiting on).

    • moog
    • 2 years ago

    Usually after the 2 yr contract expires is when the iPhone dies (in my case, happened both times about 3 months after) – doesn’t boot, doesn’t charge, just gets warm.

    While I was of the opinion that it might have just needed a new battery, the high school educated genius at the store recommended buying a new phone rather than paying the $100 for diagnostics.

    The motivation is to sell the customer the next iPhone. So why would they communicate that a simple replacement would fix all your problems?

    • odizzido
    • 2 years ago

    Every single phone sucks. Apple updates it’s software but their phones don’t have replaceable batteries or SD slots. My phone has a battery I can easily replace and an SD slot but no software updates. It’s like choose your turd. Which one smells the least?

      • RdVi
      • 2 years ago

      This is one of the reasons I have kept my phones for 3+ years. Finding a replacement is hard since it’s always a big compromise along with a big upgrade. A lot of tech products are like this for me though. Maybe we are all spoiled with building our own PC’s where the worst compromise we make is having a stupid RGB LED dragon eagle bicep on our motherboard.

      • End User
      • 2 years ago

      iPhone batteries are replaceable.

      Lack of an SD slot is not an issue for 70+ million customers per year.

        • travbrad
        • 2 years ago

        Lack of software updates is not an issue for hundreds of millions of customers either, apparently. Which is sort of odizzido’s point. You have to choose which way you want your phone/mobileOS to suck, and which way of sucking is least annoying for your use case. There isn’t an option without downsides, even if fanboys on both sides would like to claim there is.

          • End User
          • 2 years ago

          The cavalier attitude people have towards a lack of Android OS updates for hundreds of millions of Android phones is both frighting and appalling.

            • travbrad
            • 2 years ago

            Oh I agree and the worst part is the people most likely to be exploited are usually the people who are least of aware of this tradeoff in the first place. I was just pointing out “customers are okay with this” doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a good thing. That is also how we got microtransactions in nearly every video game, subscriptions/licenses instead of ownership, etc.

            As a nerdy tinkerer iOS simply can’t do what I want (regardless of the other things iPhones lack). I’ve actually tried to make it work, but after about the 50th google search revealing “there is no way to do that in iOS” it gets old. I don’t think that is the reason most people choose Android devices though. It’s more about cost than anything.

      • Bauxite
      • 2 years ago

      Android is going the HAL way pretty soon (8.0 requirement, some current phones should fit it) which will put a lot of the vendor specific OS updating to rest.

      Apple charges out the rear end for those updates with an insanely high opening price because AppleCult. (don’t drink it!) Android is no cheerful picnic but you can always buy one of last years “high end phones” for 1/Nth the price, then replacing every few years doesn’t feel quite as bad. Conveniently this ends up being after the polished turds have been discovered and outed to the world as well.

      The battery and SD card thing is still a pain but there are still enough good exceptions out there, I picked up a LG V20 for $200 which does both. I personally think sealed-battery phones should be outright banned for e-waste, security, safety and overall defective product reasons. My N5 made it 5 years until the battery hit the ~50% capacity and technically still works but no more sealed or SD-less devices for me ever again.

    • djayjp
    • 2 years ago

    To the iClones here with their fingers stuck in their ears about Apple’s manufacturing defect and planned obsolescence:

    [url<]https://www.theverge.com/circuitbreaker/2017/12/28/16825288/htc-motorola-dont-slow-processor-speeds-old-batteries-apple[/url<] Update: [url<]https://www.theverge.com/circuitbreaker/2017/12/29/16829512/samsung-lg-dont-slow-phones-older-batteries-apple[/url<]

      • MOSFET
      • 2 years ago

      [quote<]HTC and Motorola say[/quote<] You can probably stop reading right there, after the first four words.

        • djayjp
        • 2 years ago

        Booyah:

        [url<]https://www.theverge.com/circuitbreaker/2017/12/29/16829512/samsung-lg-dont-slow-phones-older-batteries-apple[/url<]

    • gerryg
    • 2 years ago

    Better headline: “Consumers address iPhone slowdown fiasco with Android replacements”

    • ClickClick5
    • 2 years ago

    Simply add an option in power settings to allow this feature to be turned off. On for “smoothness”, off for “peak performance” with the risk of a shutdown.

      • blastdoor
      • 2 years ago

      Or, just give a visible indicator that the CPU is being throttled because the battery is dying.

      There are a lot of ways to handle this that are better than what Apple chose.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 2 years ago

        Just give an indication-any indication at all-that the battery isn’t up to snuff. Don’t just do stuff and not explain it. That’s all they had to do.

          • End User
          • 2 years ago

          In early 2018, Apple will issue an iOS software update with new features that give users more visibility into the health of their iPhone’s battery, so they can see for themselves if its condition is affecting performance.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 2 years ago

            See? Why couldn’t they do that in iOS 10.2 when this started happening?

            • End User
            • 2 years ago

            I agree with you 100%.

        • Meadows
        • 2 years ago

        Yeah, as if they’d ever do that. Screenshots of the negative icon would start to circulate and start to generate bad press for them at a steady rate, instead of a forgettable spike every now and then.

      • windwalker
      • 2 years ago

      iOS is not meant to be an unholy mess of settings and notifications 99% of users don’t care about and can never hope to understand.
      For that, you use Linux.

      • travbrad
      • 2 years ago

      That would double the number of user configurable settings though!

    • blastdoor
    • 2 years ago

    I understand why people ascribe nefarious intent to Apple in this case. I can’t really criticize anyone for that, even though I don’t agree.

    I think this incident highlights a weakness in Apple, which is a combination of paternalism (we know what’s best for our customers) and insularity/secrecy (we don’t talk to anyone unless we have to).

    There are positive flip side strengths to those weaknesses, but these are definitely weaknesses. Apple has to learn from this experience and modify their behavior.

    Part of me almost wants them to lose a lawsuit over this just to make sure that the lesson is learned. Again, i don’t think they were nefarious here… but I do think they were stupid.

    Edit — one additional thought — did folks see the story about the Apple Store in Chicago that wasn’t designed to handle snow on the roof? Clear evidence that Apple is fully capable of self-defeating stupidity.

      • DragonDaddyBear
      • 2 years ago

      I haven’t seen the story. Can you please share a link.

        • blastdoor
        • 2 years ago

        [url<]https://www.spudart.org/blog/design-flaw-apple-flagship-store/[/url<]

          • DPete27
          • 2 years ago

          This problem isn’t difficult to fix, and I’d wager that this was the work of a consultant.
          Maybe I’m wrong and Apple does actually staff architects and structural engineers, but I doubt it.

            • cphite
            • 2 years ago

            Regardless of whether it was an Apple architect or an outsider… how does anyone who actually graduated an architecture program think “thin flat roof” is going to work in a city like Chicago that routinely sees mountains of snow?

            This is George Costanza architecture 😀

      • Vhalidictes
      • 2 years ago

      Who would ever need to replace a battery? This is a foreseeable consequence of sealed devices that have been getting longer and longer replacement cycles.

      What Apple really should be doing is either making batteries user-replaceable, or stopping software support earlier. Pick one.

        • blastdoor
        • 2 years ago

        Apple is now handling it appropriately in my view: be clear about the health of the battery and that the CPU is being throttled to avoid the phone dying. Let people know they can have the battery replaced at an Apple store.

        User-replaceable batteries are for nerds. Nobody else wants them, given the tradeoffs involved.

        I certainly would not want Apple to drop OS support for devices simply because of the age of the battery. That seems almost as bad as the undisclosed throttling.

          • Bauxite
          • 2 years ago

          [quote<] User-replaceable batteries are for nerds. Nobody else wants them, given the tradeoffs involved.[/quote<] Yes, drink that kool-aid more. Everyone [i<]actually[/i<] wants phones that are literally harder to hold and use because they ignore ergonomics on purpose. Ironically so many end up in thicker covers or giant oversized full-body cases anyways to protect $1000 fetish fashion statements. Let us go further and [i<]really[/i<] ignore chemistry and engineering (the only two things that separate your battery from being an actual bomb) because we know whats good for you. You are your phone! DONT BE A NERD, BUY OUR RAZOR SLAB!

          • mcarson09
          • 2 years ago

          Iphones are for idiots. The fact Iphone users tend to ignore problems with their phones and just upgrade speaks volumes.

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 2 years ago

    This only happened because Apple actually supports phones long enough to be a problem. If it were it any other company they would tell you that the phone is out of warranty and tell you to buy a new phone when it started dying. Sure, Apple was dirty and didn’t tell people they slowed the phone to keep it going but at least they did keep it going. My wife now has an SE because her Nexus 5X crapped out with the infamous boot loop problem. I’d gladly take what Apple did over a device that refuses to function. And a $30 fix is pretty good for them too offer for a phone that is 4 generations old and still supported.

      • Blytz
      • 2 years ago

      Fair call re the 5X. Mine’s fine but my wives spat it, mind you for the premium you pay for an apple phone over the other models at the time I expect it to be supported better for longer.

      It’s a fair trade off in the user pays scheme if you ever need it

        • DragonDaddyBear
        • 2 years ago

        Some Android device manufactures charge an arm and a leg for their phones, too. At least my wife’s phone won’t be obsolete as quickly as mine (S8 Active).

      • Jigar
      • 2 years ago

      Dragon, i didn’t knew TR was filled with Apple fanboys but your argument is ridiculous.

      1) Apple throttling their phone was unknown to people.
      2) Their customer had no clue why their phone slowed down and hence had no choice but to buy a new phone after finding that formatting wasn’t helping
      3) No where was it mentioned that this update was a remedy of sudden shut down.
      4) Funny thing this throttling was permanent and could only get worst.

      So you tell me $30 fix is great, when they are caught with their pants down ? Oh and this solution comes only after they are sued, so i believe we should thank the people who got pissed ?

        • DragonDaddyBear
        • 2 years ago

        I’m no Apple fan boy. I use an Android phone because I dislike the restrictive nature Apple. I said they were dirty for they way they did it. My point is if it were any other phone maker they would have said piss off after the warranty period. Samsung won’t give a rats behind about my S8 Active in 2 years. My wife’s phone will be on the latest iOS. Hate all you want but that is good service.

      • Klimax
      • 2 years ago

      My phone has replaceable battery, so I only need access to extra battery…

      • YukaKun
      • 2 years ago

      I’m still running my Samsung Galaxy S2 with Cyanogen mod. I still have 10, because it’s been rock solid and I didn’t like 11 nor the newest versions of Android.

      Company support or not, Apple has another problem Android makers don’t have, really: open/community support.

      If Samsung stops giving official support, their device is open enough for people to customize it and play with it to give it more features.

      And still with the original battery having 100% performance, but less charge obviously 🙂

      Cheers!

        • strangerguy
        • 2 years ago

        I’m sure your opinions about how good your S2 still is very relevant in the current day because Samsung locked down their phones against custom ROMing since Note 3 in 2013.

        But dat Samsung’s legendary ~*community support*~ and non-replaceable batteries since 2015, amirite?

          • YukaKun
          • 2 years ago

          Not the”current day”, no. You’re just being a jerk and missing the point of the discussion by a mile; maybe on purpose. We’re talking about old phones and how they behave. Once I have a need to replace my S2, then I’ll deal with whatever Samsung has done to the new Galaxy phones and choose accordingly.

      • ddarko
      • 2 years ago

      [quote<]If it were it any other company they would tell you that the phone is out of warranty and tell you to buy a new phone when it started dying.[/quote<] One of the allegations raised in the lawsuits is that Apple recommended people get new phones when they brought theirslow iPhones for service rather than disclose that a software implementation was causing the slowdown or advised people to get a new battery. And why are we so quick to believe Apple's explanation that their motive was purely to look out for the user experience? They have form here and it's not positive. Look up the lawsuit over Apple's borking of Facetime in iOS 6. At the time, they said there was a certificate bug that cause Facetime to stop working in iOS 6 and the only way to get it to work again was to upgrade to iOS 7. Well, it turns out that the "bug" was caused by Apple deliberately refusing to renew the certificate so it could force people to move to iOS 7 that used a relay implementation of Facetime that would save it money. I disagree that Apple deserves some credit here. The lack of disclosure is by itself a serious and fundamental breach of trust. This wasn't a minor thing - the fix cut CPU clock speed in half. If I took my car in to the shop because it was having engine trouble and the mechanic "fixed" it by cutting the horsepower in half without telling me, I'd be royally pissed and his excuse that he did it because he was looking out for my best interest wouldn't cut it.

        • DragonDaddyBear
        • 2 years ago

        I had not heard about the FaceTime issue. That’s very interesting. It’s stuff like this that makes me dislike Apple. There commitment to old hardware had caused them to make some questionable moves. Either live in the RDF and be happy that they do anything for you or be left to the whim of Android phone makers that have terrible, short support models. Kinda feels like we’re just $$$ to big companies (because we are).

    • Duct Tape Dude
    • 2 years ago

    An engineering dilemma. If they let phones shut off due to a battery’s inability to supply sufficient instantaneous power, everyone would cry “planned obsolescence!” Meanwhile in the real timeline, they release a fix that lets everyone keep their phones longer with some performance penalty, and everyone cries just the same.

    Imo, other manufacturers skirt around this issue due to bigger batteries. More capacity means more power, and Apple’s batteries are quite small in comparison to most Android phones. If Apple designers left their obsession with thin behind and enlarged the battery, I don’t think this would be necessary.

    I don’t like Apple, but I think their engineers made the right choice. Their PR and designers may be a different story.

      • djayjp
      • 2 years ago

      Their engineers didn’t make the right choice to start off with anyway. They should’ve designed a phone that lasts. My 2.5 year old S6, that I kept on overnight quick charging throughout virtually every night, is running right in line with its as new performance, according to benchmarks (tho admittedly the ram usage/eviction has increased with update bloat over the years). Compare that with 1 year old iPhone 7’s that are already being throttled….

        • cegras
        • 2 years ago

        You are one data point while Apple has the entire population and a distribution to work with.

        • MOSFET
        • 2 years ago

        The phones “last” just fine. (I’ve begun twice to explain my assertion with civility, but your assertion is so childish, I can’t even make progress right now. Take some responsibility for your expensive devices, oh wait, you don’t have an “affected” phone? Then why…nevermind.)

        If you own an iPhone AND take care of your battery (as any owner of any reasonably priced phone should), this is a non-issue. If you abuse your battery and keep it close to the ragged edge (a la Radeons), you get a lower-performing device eventually. Sounds fair to me.

        Dam, I have an iPhone and I couldn’t care less. If it does eventually age before being dropped at an inopportune time, we’ll see if I care about this throttling then, although I imagine I would rather have my old phone slow down a little rather than shut off prematurely.

        By all appearances, if a battery is in good shape, an owner has nothing to b!tch about.

        • dragontamer5788
        • 2 years ago

        [quote<]They should've designed a phone that lasts[/quote<] Its not the phone that degrades, its the battery. I don't even like Apple products. But to be fair: Lithium-Ion batteries degrading affects everybody equally. Its a well-known problem, and it seems like the only group that has figured out how to deal with it is Tesla (with advanced charging metrics, a ton of sensors plastered all over the place, and 1,500lbs worth of cells to distribute the wear-and-tear over). I severely doubt there's a solution to the Lithium-ion degregation problem when you are talking about single-cell single-pouch batteries.

      • ChronoReverse
      • 2 years ago

      [quote<]Imo, other manufacturers skirt around this issue due to bigger batteries. More capacity means more power, and Apple's batteries are quite small in comparison to most Android phones. If Apple designers left their obsession with thin behind and enlarged the battery, I don't think this would be necessary.[/quote<] Battery wear characteristics are generally quite well known and the method to deal with it has always been overprovisioning. The cell phone industry has long used less overprovisioning than anywhere else because of the stringent size and weight needs but still had leeway that 3 years of wear is only expected to reduce battery life (in comparison, electric cars generally aim for closer to 7 years). Considering this software fix was added after the fact, most likely the particular battery chemistry Apple chose started wearing faster due to an unexpected factor (could be the chemistry wearing more over time than charge cycles, or unexpected heat source, etc.). Apple should have owned up to this properly instead of trying to silently hide it.

      • CaptTomato
      • 2 years ago

      LOL, the right choice was removable batteries, but too many people tolerate these megacorps ass raping and then actually worship them, LOL.

      • clocks
      • 2 years ago

      Didn’t Apple lead the charge to non-replaceable batteries? Which many feel was done for planned obsolescence.

    • heerohawwah
    • 2 years ago

    Wow, Apple strikes again; How to turn a negative into a positive and make a profit at the same time…every con-artist should do a case study on Apple and its ability to twist things around. Gotta learn the tricks of the trade some how.

      • blastdoor
      • 2 years ago

      I don’t agree at all. There’s no positive here. There are two expalanaition — Apple was evil or Apple was stupid. I personally think it’s stupid rather than evil. But there’s no upside here, and I suspect Apple is smart enough to at least realize that.

        • cegras
        • 2 years ago

        Or, maybe you were stupid? It’s ironic how the ones who know how to benchmark or make a big stink about performance could not understand the most basic principles of battery chemistry.

          • MOSFET
          • 2 years ago

          I’m with you on this one, cegras. I don’t expect it to be a popular stance.

          Seems like a lot of Android owners are in up in arms. Huh, go figure.

            • windwalker
            • 2 years ago

            Every time there’s some fuss about Apple, it’s always the Android users who are making the most noise. It’s almost as if — despite their loud protestations — they’re still bitter because they know they settled for second best.

        • jihadjoe
        • 2 years ago

        Personally I think it was rather smart of their engineers to slow down the phones to prevent random shutdowns. What’s questionable is why they decided to withold information about what was going on.

        The public may have been a lot more accepting to begin with if they knew the slowdowns were being done in order to keep their phones alive, and previous performance could be restored with a battery replacement. Proper disclosure could have been a both PR and revenue win because they wouldn’t even have had to give a discount on those batteries and iPhone owners would’ve gone to buy them.

          • windwalker
          • 2 years ago

          [quote=”iOS release notes”<]iOS 10.2.1 iOS 10.2.1 includes bug fixes and improves the security of your iPhone or iPad. It also improves power management during peak workloads to avoid unexpected shutdowns on iPhone.[/quote<] The press failed to ask Apple for details or investigate in any way at the time and now they're pretending they've "caught" some big lie. It's true that Apple could and should have done more than simply implement throttling. The problem they fixed in that update is a clear indication iOS should warn the user when the battery needs to be changed. But to conflate a missing feature as a conspiracy is just madness.

    • tsk
    • 2 years ago

    Excellent, both my mom and GF needs this and I was planning on doing it myself, but this is a good price.

      • gerryg
      • 2 years ago

      A better price would have been “free”. It’s not like Apple doesn’t have enough cash sitting around, a pile big enough that many nations are jealous. Betcha anything that replacing those batteries costs them a less than $29 and they make a profit.

        • jihadjoe
        • 2 years ago

        Previous [url=https://technology.ihs.com/511475/iphone-6-plus-100-costlier-for-consumers-to-buyjust-1550-more-expensive-for-apple-to-make<]teardowns[/url<] suggest the battery on the iPhone6 costs between $3.50 and $6, depending on the specific SKU.

          • ludi
          • 2 years ago

          Good info, although the labor isn’t free. However an experienced tech with the right set of tiny screwdrivers can do it in less than 15 minutes.

      • gerryg
      • 2 years ago

      Battery only costs Apple $10 to make. Apple made BILLIONS in profit last quarter. This “discounted” battery will further increase profits. And you think “this is a good price”? Ripoff!

      [url<]https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/talkingtech/2017/12/30/apples-apology-batterygate-didnt-go-far-enough/991153001/[/url<] The only reason people pay the Apple luxury tax is because they already bought lots of apps and store their “stuff” in iCloud, plus the snobbishness of owning one of the most expensive phones out there. People are throwing away good money for no reason IMO,perfectly good alternatives for less $$ out there.

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