MSI Optix MPG27C and MPG27CQ displays tick all the right boxes

MSI has been aggressively expanding its monitor line lately. As if to demonstrate that point, the company's showing off its new Optix MPG series displays at CES today. There are two monitors in the series, the MPG27C and MPG27CQ. Both are curved 27" gaming monitors that use VA panels running at up to 144 Hz refresh rates.

The primary differences in the two displays are their resolution and brightness: the MPG27C is a 1920×1080 monitor with a rather pedestrian 250 cd/m² typical brightness, while the MPG27CQ has a 2560×1440 panel with a 400 cd/m² brightness rating. Both displays are rated for a 1-ms response time, 3000:1 static contrast ratio, and 178° horizontal and vertical viewing angles. Notably, that 1-ms number is marked down as an MPRT (Motion Picture Response Time) figure, likely indicating the presence of some form of blur-reduction mode.

MSI says the monitors can cover 100% of the NTSC color space. That means they should cover far more than 100% of the sRGB space and thereby offer rich, saturated colors. The displays support SteelSeries' GameSense tech, too. Along the bottom-front edge of the monitors there are five RGB LED zones that MSI says can be configured in the SteelSeries Engine software to indicate in-game timers or cooldowns, Discord notifications, or other similar information. The back of the monitors also have RGB LED accents, although those are purely for aesthetic purposes.

There's nary a mention of FreeSync or G-Sync on the datasheets for these displays, but the stated vertical sync range of 48 Hz to 144 Hz looks awfully familiar to us. We'd be surprised if these monitors didn't support FreeSync in some fashion. Both monitors have one DisplayPort 1.2 connection and two HDMI inputs, as well as a two-port USB hub—USB 2.0 on the MPG27C, and USB 3.0 on the MPG27CQ. Both displays are VESA-mountable, too.

MSI didn't say when or for how much you could get one of the Optix MPG-series monitors, but we imagine that information will be forthcoming soon.

Comments closed
    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    The Optix are cheaper than the Predator or Agon lines over here in the EU, so I’m going to make a note of these for later, once the reviews are out.

    • Usacomp2k3
    • 2 years ago

    I with manufacturers would stick with a color space to describe. We’ve got NTSC, sRGB, DCI-P3, Rec.2020, Rec.709 (which apparently is the same colors as sRGB but a slightly wider gamma range). It’s hard to compare them to each other when they use different color spaces to describe their colors.

    • Usacomp2k3
    • 2 years ago

    I with manufacturers would stick with a color space to describe. We’ve got NTSC, sRGB, DCI-P3, Rec.2020, Rec.709 (which apparently is the same colors as sRGB but a slightly wider gamma range). It’s hard to compare them to each other when they use different color spaces to describe their colors.

    • Kretschmer
    • 2 years ago

    Ugh, a curve is so needless at 27″. Some of us like to use our monitors to watch shows or movies in bed. And the lack of HDR is an odd box to leave unchecked in 2018.

    Hopefully these *VA panels can keep up with 144Hz operation, because none of the existing VA panels are fast enough to do so. From personal experience, slow pixel transitions stick out like a sore thumb with a strobing backlight.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 2 years ago

      You mean “without a strobing backlight,” right?

        • Kretschmer
        • 2 years ago

        No, with a strobing backlight abnormaly slow transitions are really jarring. Think out a room in a FPS that you’re running through sideways. With ULMB you get amazing clarity, and everything “persists,” except a door on the wall leaves a long obvious “streak” behind it.

        Without strobing, everything is blurry, mitigating the relative impact of some exceptionally slow transitions. With strobing, the outliers look really, really weird.

          • RAGEPRO
          • 2 years ago

          I mean, I have [url=https://www.asus.com/us/Monitors/ROG-STRIX-XG27VQ/<]a strobing VA display[/url<] here in front of me (and this isn't my first one). Haven't noticed the effect you're talking about, but it makes sense. I'm running at 120Hz for strobe mode rather than 144Hz, so possibly it's overdriven enough that it really isn't an issue.

          • tay
          • 2 years ago

          There is no current VA panel that doesn’t have smearing when rendering dark scenes. Some people don’t notice it, but every review warns about dark color transition times. I really want a VA panel for the blacks, but I’m waiting till there’s one with good reviews.

      • Usacomp2k3
      • 2 years ago

      I have 3 27″ monitors at my desk and wish they were slightly curved. Instead I’ve got 45* angles between each monitor, which is mildly annoying.

        • Anovoca
        • 2 years ago

        at least Asus has your back: [url<]https://techreport.com/news/33054/asus-shows-off-a-bevy-of-rog-gaming-pcs-and-accessories-at-ces[/url<] Now for a nominal fee you can turn those 2x 45 degree angles into 4x 22.5 degree angles!

        • Kretschmer
        • 2 years ago

        I’ve done two x 27″ before without incident (one directly in front and one to the side). I can see wanting curves for the exceedingly rare triple-monitor setup, but I prefer flat panels so my monitor can double as my bedroom TV.

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