Intel Optane SSD 800P brings 3D Xpoint speed to more builders and devices

CES 2018 – Intel announced a new Optane SSD for PCs this afternoon. The Optane SSD 800P is an M.2 SSD that bridges the gap between Optane Memory modules for hard disk drive acceleration and the Optane SSD 900P add-in card and U.2 devices for desktops.

This PCIe 3.0 x2 drive will come in two capacities—58 GB and 118 GB—and is targeted at enthusiasts and mobile users who want the high QD1 performance and low latency of Optane media without stepping all the way up to the 900P series. Intel envisions this drive in dual-device scenarios with a traditional NAND SSD or hard drive backing the Optane device, a setup that's practically required given the relatively low capacities of these drives.

The Optane SSD 800P uses the same controller and firmware as for Optane memory, and it has full power-management features for use with desktop and mobile devices. It's rated for 200 GB of writes per day across its five-year warranty. Prices and performance information will come later.

Comments closed
    • johnsmith26
    • 2 years ago
    • freebird
    • 2 years ago

    If it uses “…the same controller and firmware as for Optane memory” does it also have the same lock-in/lock-outs?
    —-
    7th Generation (or newer) Intel® Core™ Processor
    Intel® 200 Series Chipset (or newer)
    Intel Optane memory ready UEFI BIOS. Legacy BIOS mode is not supported
    Windows® 10 x64
    —-
    I would hope not, but I doubt I’d replace a Samsung EVO or Pro 960 with it… there are very few use cases where I think I would notice.

      • exilon
      • 2 years ago

      Those requirements only applied if you wanted to use the drive as part of a hybrid volume w/Intel SRT caching, which requires setting the PCH SATA mode to Intel RST instead of standard AHCI.

      Nothing stopping you from using any of the Optane sticks as a standard NVMe drive, apart from size, or as a cache drive using some other software.

        • Rza79
        • 2 years ago

        [quote<]as a cache drive using some other software[/quote<] Which is built-in Windows 10 by the way.

    • Dygear
    • 2 years ago

    I still don’t see why anyone would buy these. Am I missing something?

      • dragontamer5788
      • 2 years ago

      Its the fastest SSD available today by latency measurements.

      Bigger SSDs get a bandwidth lift, but nothing can improve latency numbers aside from switching to a different technology.

      • Takeshi7
      • 2 years ago

      This is why: [url<]https://img.purch.com/r/600x450/aHR0cDovL21lZGlhLmJlc3RvZm1pY3JvLmNvbS9RLzUvNzIyODEzL29yaWdpbmFsL2ltYWdlMDE2LnBuZw==[/url<]

    • derFunkenstein
    • 2 years ago

    This is great for a three-tiered storage system:

    118GB for Windows and some frequently-used apps
    1TB SSD for the most commonly-played games (since Optane probably won’t help with load times over SSD)
    4TB+ for other media

      • tay
      • 2 years ago

      If it’s not transparent between the Optane + SSD like Apple’s Fusion Drive, it’s not going to work for 95% of users.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 2 years ago

        I’ll grant that it does add some complexity, but Intel doesn’t seem to be aiming this at 95% of users. Those guys get the 16/32GB Optane accelerators that, with Intel’s software installed, are invisible and just cache stuff.

          • tay
          • 2 years ago

          Ahh ok, one could use these 58 GB drives the same way too I assume. I like it.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 2 years ago

            Maybe, and pricing wouldn’t be too bad. The 32GB accelerator is around $90. I expect these things to be priced around $150 and $300. At that point, anything less than 1TB might as well just be an SSD.

    • notfred
    • 2 years ago

    For Windows that capacity may be small, but it’s fine for Linux.

    • Ninjitsu
    • 2 years ago

    Well, my current C: drive is ~51GB (Win 10), and I have another 6GB of programs and misc stuff installed on another drive. That makes 58GB pretty tight. I’m assuming it’s 58GiB and not GB, too.

    118GB would be enough for Windows + Programs, though, or for a game like Arma 3 + mods. Most games probably won’t see much of a difference b/w a NAND SSD or Optane, though.

    • drfish
    • 2 years ago

    I have a spare M.2 slot, almost picked up one of the smaller drives just to kicks, but now I’m seriously considering one of these as a “it’s stupid, but imma gonna stash a couple games on this” (ISBIGSACGOT) drive.

    • K-L-Waster
    • 2 years ago

    I get the intended use case of OS & programs and put everything else on another SSD or HDD, but TBH this looks too limiting to be interesting at these capacities. You’d have to be really ruthless about keeping the boot drive to the bare essentials.

    Once the capacity gets closer to half a TB they’ll be more practical.

    • DavidC1
    • 2 years ago

    Other articles suggest these drives have the lower power idle state which will cut down the idle power figure significantly. Currently Optane Memory is at 3.5W active and 1W idle. The idle power makes it unsuitable for laptops.

    There will also be “Optane Mobile M10” which is specifically targeted at laptops.

    One article states some laptops display at Intel booth comes with two RAID 0 Optane SSD 800P.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    PCIe 3.0 x2 = real-world sequential speeds of 1400MB/s so I’m not even remotely worried about that; it’s the small-file, low-queue-depth that matters.

    The real question is this:

    Although Intel want you to use these is a dual-device scenario as an accelerator for a second drive, is 58GB big enough for a Windows install? I’m gonna go with “yes”, as long as the price is proportional to the 16 and 32GB options. I’d expect the 58GB model to go for $120-140, which is impulse-buy territory, for sure.

      • DancinJack
      • 2 years ago

      It definitely is. I have a full-fat W10 Pro x64 install on my boot drive, and all the exes of all the programs I use and it’s 57.0GB right now. I’m not certain you’ll get that full 58, probably closer to 50, but it should be pretty close to a full install for a lot of people.

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        Yeah, I have a 64GB W10 tablet that’s running at about 15GB free with all my stuff installed.

        My main concern is that Windows installs bloat over time. Perhaps Windows 10’s “nuke the entire OS every major update” will prevent a 50GB WinSXS folder like W7 and W8 used to get….

          • K-L-Waster
          • 2 years ago

          [quote<]Perhaps Windows 10's "nuke the entire OS every major update" will prevent a 50GB WinSXS folder like W7 and W8 used to get....[/quote<] Dear god I hope so... those were atrocious.

            • cygnus1
            • 2 years ago

            They definitely were. But the nuke the entire OS updates are gone now, or at least I thought I remembered reading that the future updates will install more like service packs of the days of yore. I think the biggest thing that will keep the Windows servicing folder (WinSxS) from growing to stupid sizes is the cumulative updates. Overwriting the older updates should keep that directory pretty manageable.

      • Rza79
      • 2 years ago

      If the Marvell 88NV1160 and Phison E8 can get 1600MB/s over PCIe 3.0 x2 then I don’t see how Intel should be limited to 1400MB/s.
      PCIe 3.0 x2 can deliver an effective BW of 1.97 GB/s according to wiki.

    • Bauxite
    • 2 years ago

    The 900p PCIe/U.2/”external M.2″ versions are still an interesting deal as long as the SC codes come with them. ~$150 net for a screaming boot/program drive is pretty tempting.

    This thing needs to be benched as even the 280GB 900p is rated at 14W/5W load/idle, the much lower power profile of M.2 is going to mean throttling somewhere, not just the reduction to x2 lanes either.

      • exilon
      • 2 years ago

      You’d need to get someone to buy the code off of you for $200 dollars, not counting transaction fees, to hit a $150 net for the 280GB U2M2 version.

      At current prices you can get it for $230 assuming you don’t scammed while flipping the code.

        • evilpaul
        • 2 years ago

        I got $225 for my code (before fees). It was from a 480GB one though, so the value wasn’t super amazing, but I’m happy with it.

      • DavidC1
      • 2 years ago

      These should be lower power, as the article suggests its using same controller and firmware as Optane Memory, which has an Active Power rating of 3.5W and Idle of 1W.

      I believe, Optane SSD 800P is the code-name Carson Beach that was leaked in a roadmap a while ago. We’ll see Carson Beach as 2nd Gen Optane Memory in a few months when 300-series chipset leaks(not the rebranded one called the Z370).

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]This PCIe 3.0 x2 drive will come in two capacities—58 GB and 118 GB[/quote<] That was supposed to be 83GB and 169GB but Meltdown was so bad that it's 30% off the Optane storage capacity too!

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 2 years ago

      New year’s resolution to make even worse jokes?

      You’ve succeeded and it’s been a week. Nice

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        Wrong!

        My new year’s resolution was to become an AMD fanboy. I’m trying here. It’s harder than hitting the gym at 4 AM.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 2 years ago

          If it makes you feel better, I laughed while awarding the requisite downvotes. :p

          • K-L-Waster
          • 2 years ago

          If you really want to impress people you’ll need to be an AMD fanboy *while* hitting the gym at 4 AM.

            • chuckula
            • 2 years ago

            Looks like I’ll be Ryzen early!

          • HERETIC
          • 2 years ago

          That’ll destroy the fantasy of seeing you and Charlie from S/A locked in a room for a day.

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