Thermaltake Pacific CL radiators pack copper, brass, and steel

A couple years back, Thermaltake caught our attention with its commitment to providing a one-stop shop for custom liquid-cooling setups. That intention hasn't waned in the meantime. At CES this year, the Taiwanese manufacturer has introduced the Pacific CL line of liquid-cooling radiators with new materials and a new design.

Thermaltake overhauled the materials list for the Pacific CL radiator and used copper and brass for the fins instead of the zinc-treated aluminum of previous designs. The side panels are now constructed of stainless steel, a move that the company says allows it to improve the durability of the radiators while cutting back on their weight.

Trimming some weight off the radiators was probably a good move, because they're large. The smallest of the Pacific CL radiators is 360 mm, and 420-mm and 480-mm sizes are also available. The product pictures don't quite do justice to how thick these units are at 2.5" (64 mm), making the largest one comparable in size to a certain mini-PC over at the Digital Storm booth. Like Thermaltake's other Pacific radiators, the CL versions have two G1/4 ports.

In addition to the new radiators, Thermaltake has several new liquid-cooling accessories coming to its online storefont. The company claims that its Pacific C-Pro 16-mm OD compression fitting simplifies the process of tubing installation, and its Tt Premium Ice Blue UV concentrate coolant is ready to make custom loops glow with an unearthly blue light. Finally, Thermaltake also has the Pacific M4 RGB CPU water block, which is specifically designed to play well with Asus's Aura Sync RGB LED software. The company hasn't announced prices for any of these products, but tells us to expect them up on its website soon.

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    • Shobai
    • 2 years ago

    When you say that Tt has used copper and brass for the fins, Eric, do you / they really mean brass tubes and copper fins? If so, are they saying the entirety of the water path is brass? (I assume the tanks are brass)

    That’s a much better product than their alu options, if so – you’ll see minimal galvanic corrosion between brass and copper.

      • sleeprae
      • 2 years ago

      I hope you’re correct, especially since brass has inferior thermal conductivity than most aluminum alloys.

      • EricBorn
      • 2 years ago

      I wish I had more information here, but the materials I have are a little vague on this point. Thermaltake calls it a “high-density copper and brass fin design.” Hopefully when the product page goes up we’ll know a little more.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    Finally.

    Not that I’m in the market for a custom waterloop radiator, but the Tt Pacific line has always stuck out as a terrible, terrible mistake.

    When PC watercooling was immature and I used an aquarium pump and laboratory tubing in my beige Chieftec case, I made the mistake of mixing metals (the barbs weren’t the copper of the block/rad. I had to basically scrap the lot and it was an expensive mistake.

      • thecoldanddarkone
      • 2 years ago

      Honestly all the fittings I’ve looked at are usually brass (underneath the finish).

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        Yes, brass is (predominantly) copper, which is what matters when talking about electrolytisc corrosion in water loops. You can mix brass and copper alloys all day – they don’t undergo redox reactions in a water loop. What you absolutely cannot ever do is add aluminium.

        All these AIO solutions that use alloy radiators and copper waterblocks have a distinct shelf life and are filled with extremely potent corrosion inhibitor. Nobody really cares because the whole disposable system costs far less than even a single waterblock for a custom loop.

      • Kougar
      • 2 years ago

      I am definitely curious, these things look just as thick as my ThermoChill PA140.3. With the emphasis on slim rads just don’t see thick ones anymore. I’m curious how these will match up.

        • Shobai
        • 2 years ago

        I’m curious – what case have you got that mounts a thick 140.3 radiator? I run 2x 60mm thick 280mm radiators and haven’t found a single case that would take both without modification.

          • Kougar
          • 2 years ago

          I use a HAF-X, one of the first towers I ever found that would fit a 60mm thick triple 140mm radiator as an exhaust without blocking the motherboard. I just had to drill a few extra screw mounts in the top for the third fan but the rest was already perfect. Rad is inside the case, and the three fans fit perfectly under the top shroud.

          There are a dozen case options today that will fit these thick 420 and 480 radiators, but most are behemoths like the 900D or are overpriced cubes. MountainMods made a tower version some time back. I do not readily recall other tower options but they do exist.

          If you are dead set on dual rads something like the [url=http://www.thermaltakeusa.com/Chassis/Cube_Case_/Core/C_00002562/Core_X9/design.htm<]Thermaltake Core X9[/url<] might interest you, it can fit dual 420/480 rads in the top and/or one in the lower chamber. The smaller X5 sibling would probably work for you too if you stick to dual 280mm rads.

            • Shobai
            • 2 years ago

            Thanks for the detailed reply!

    • moose17145
    • 2 years ago

    I have always thought about water cooling my PC and think it would be a fun project to take on… but the cost associated with it has always very quickly put an end to it before it even begins. But that being said… the case I have would certainly be conducive to water cooling.

      • Voldenuit
      • 2 years ago

      I took the lazy route and went CLC.

      $60 for a 240-mm rad cooler on sale was too good to pass up.

        • Welch
        • 2 years ago

        Same here, $29 for the CoolerMaster 240 lite. Hard to the down.

      • juzz86
      • 2 years ago

      There’s a decent halfway point in the EK FluidGaming gear now.

      As long as you ‘keep it in the family’ and don’t mix/match parts (and metals) too much, it seems like ‘CLC-priced’ custom loops aren’t far away.

      They do radiator and pre-filled GPU block expansions packs now, too.

      It’s got me very intrigued for my next box, that’s for sure.

      • Kougar
      • 2 years ago

      DIY watercooling isn’t really worth it unless you are going to commit to cooling (at minimum) a high-end CPU and GPU combo, particularly with some overclocking. If you replace GPU or CPUs frequently then it still probably isn’t worth it.

      The cost of doing it right is high, but a proper DIY loop will outlast CLC setups and outperform air cooling with lower noise. I stick to 5 year minimums between builds when I can, but the radiator is 7 years old and the MCP655 pump is 11.

    • JosiahBradley
    • 2 years ago

    If this comment reaches +42 I’ll watercool my next PC!!!

    Edit: okay okay, I’ll add RGB lights too!!!

      • Voldenuit
      • 2 years ago

      Shoulda said +/- 42.

        • JosiahBradley
        • 2 years ago

        It’ll be my most down-voted comment but it’ll be worth it.

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