EVGA teases its 2200-W power supply and Z10 keyboard at CES

Exhibitions like CES are a great place to find the largest, wildest, and most extravagant pieces of hardware on the market. This year's show has been no exception. At EVGA's booth, convention-goers were treated to a peek at a monstrously-powerful power supply. The model name of EVGA's new Supernova 2200 P2 PSU isn't a misnomer—that's an actual 2200W power supply.

EVGA hasn't made a full announcement for the product, but it did post to Twitter a picture of the unit’s label. Notably, the unit can provide 2,200W at 50°C. That’s 183.3 amps on the +12V rail. The Supernova 2200 P2 is fully modular, providing nineteen sockets total. Nine of those sockets are for PCIe cables, possibly indicating that this power supply is designed with cryptocurrency mining rigs in mind. The unit is 80 Plus Platinum certified, and takes a 200-240 V AC input, so don't plan on plugging it into an ordinary American wall socket.

While we're taking a gander at EVGA's booth lineup, the company also has a new version of its Z10 Gaming keyboard on display. As with the Supernova 2200 P2 PSU, EVGA hasn't made an official announcement about the keyboard. From pictures, we can see that it’s a large model with an attached wrist-rest, media keys, numpad, and macro buttons. The unit maintains the LCD display from previous designs.

Pricing and availability information isn’t available, but we expect EVGA to make a more detailed announcement about these products shortly.

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    • TwistedKestrel
    • 2 years ago

    They should start shipping these PSUs with battery clamps, so you can use them to start your car in a pinch

    • Bensam123
    • 2 years ago

    Big companies have to be pretttty stupid to still ignore crypto miners. That’s a lot of money. Nvidia and AMD are getting fleeced regardless of wanting it or not. There are other options out there instead of dealing with over priced namebrand PSUs, that’s a lot of lost money for PSU manufacturers.

    • MEATLOAF2
    • 2 years ago

    I’ve got a 750 p2, and these power supplies are no joke. Confidence alone is worth the extra cost, not to mention stable power delivery and efficiency.

    First “good” PSU I’ve had and I’ll never go back. I think half of my PC problems over the years have been a result of having a garbage PSU.

    • yuhong
    • 2 years ago

    I wonder if 120v with NEMA 5-20 would be possible.

    • Krogoth
    • 2 years ago

    This PSU needs to use high-voltage/high-amp outlets in order work anywhere near its maximum load.

    Standard 15A NEMA socket don’t cut it and you’ll see similar stories for residential outlets through most of the EU/Japan/Australia/South Korea.

      • Shobai
      • 2 years ago

      Aussie 240V sockets are rated for 10A, so this should be fine. Shared outlet breakers are usually rated for 16A, as is the cabling – worst case would have the PC this was powering on a dedicated circuit, but that’s not unusual.

      • excession
      • 2 years ago

      UK outlets are 230V 13A, so 3kW. 32A per circuit (ring main). We’ll be reet.

      • moose17145
      • 2 years ago

      EU, Australia, and South Korea should all be fine to use these. They all run on a 200+ volt standard. Japan will likely have issues since they run on 100volt.

      Basically anyone who lives in a country that uses a 200-240v standard will likely be fine, even in residential homes. It is only the Countries like the US and Japan where a 100-120V standard is used that running one of these bad boys will present an issue. Although cutting out Japan and America does cut out a huge portion of people to sell these to, that still leaves a lot of the world that could run these just fine.

    • TwoEars
    • 2 years ago

    Glad to see there are still some keyboards with displays being made. I still got my Logitech G19 and it’s great! Don’t know what I’d replace it with. I used Aida64 to program it and it displays cpu load, ram usage, gpu usage, gpu memory usage, Mhz, temp etc. Pretty useful.

    • deruberhanyok
    • 2 years ago

    I have this bigass Corsair white RM1000i which is super awesome (thanks TR!) I did a little reorganizing the other day and had all my boxes powered down. But I had a little space heater running off of a different outlet than the PCs; same circuit (15A 120V). Pulling maybe 600W. (didn’t have the wattsup plugged in, but it was set medium-ish).

    When I got everything reconnected I powered on two of the other systems and they were fine. But when I went to bring the main box online it got stuck in this power hiccup cycle. On, start, off, on, start, off. I figured, crap, maybe I broke something. A couple minutes of checking connections I thought, well, there’s a lot of load on the circuit, maybe it can’t get enough current to juice up. So I shut off the heater and the system powered up just fine.

    The takeaway for me was that I was obviously overloading the circuit and shouldn’t be running a heater on the same one as my PCs, that’s an easy enough fix. But I also didn’t have this problem when the systems were already running and I turned the heater on.

    Anyways, I guess I’m saying, with power supplies getting bigger, it was just a matter of time before they went 240v only. But also what are you going to do with a 2.2kw power supply? Can you even cram that many video cards into one box?

    • moose17145
    • 2 years ago

    I have been running the 1,000 watt G2 for several years now. It has been a very good power supply thus far. Plus those TEN year warranties EVGA puts on these things is borderline reason enough to buy them over most other competitors in my mind.

    That being said… I find this power supply pretty cool. If for no other reason than the shear craziness of it. Oh I fully understand the absurdity of this size of PSU… and you know what? I am fine with it. Bring on the 3KW model!

      • juzz86
      • 2 years ago

      I run the very same unit mate, for about the same time. Picked it up very cheap on a local forum, and remains one of my best purchases ever.

      I load up at about 460W, so I wanted something that was happy with that load. The G2 doesn’t even spin up the fan at that point – which was a big win.

        • moose17145
        • 2 years ago

        I got mine before they were semi-fanless, so the fan on mine always spins. That being said, it is quiet enough that I never hear it over the other ambient noises

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    Simple e-peen bragging, and nothing else.

    The only possible use for these is mining rigs, and the hungriest mining card is a Vega64 but a miner will be clocking the core at minimum speeds and simply using the 8GB HBM2 at the highest possible clocks. Most miners are running Vega64 at -50% power limits, which puts them at 145W max. In reality it’ll be much lower than this.

    Anyway, let’s assume 145W max, and then plug a card into each of the 7 slots on a motherboard (never mind that these will all be running at x4 or x1, that’s adequate for mining);

    7 * 145W = 1015W.

    But that doesn’t happen, because it’s more cost-effective to buy a motherboard/RAM/CPU for every four GPUs because you can use an off-the-shelf case (open, of course) to mount everything in, with a much more affordable 750W PSU.

      • xeridea
      • 2 years ago

      You don’t run V64 at -50% power. Reasonably mining a Cryptonight algorithm it is ~200W. You can run 8 cards on Windows (at full speed…), so 1600W + some for system. So 1650/2200 good number to be at.

      1080TI also great profit now, pulling 250W stock. 1080TI you will run around 100% power due to all good algorithms for it being compute bound, not memory (GDDR5X sucks for memory bound algorithms). So 8x250w = 2000W.

      You don’t use cases for mining. You just hang em open air on a cheap shelf, or make an open air aluminum frame if you care more for looks. And 6 is more reasonable number of cards, mobo, cpu, ram, ssd costs add up fast.

      With higher PSU prices now, it is cheaper to get multiple smaller power supplies, say 850W and run dual PSUs (it is trivial to link them).

    • RickyTick
    • 2 years ago

    And it doubles as a portable welder. FTW

    • JosiahBradley
    • 2 years ago

    @_@ 2200W !!! Tried plugging in PSU, instructions unclear, house burnt down.

      • jihadjoe
      • 2 years ago

      At what point do you need a dedicated breaker for your PC? lol

        • the
        • 2 years ago

        MORE POWER!

          • setaG_lliB
          • 2 years ago

          My 12k BTU air-con plugs into a standard 120v outlet. Hard to imagine a computer actually using (far) more power than that…yikes!

        • DPete27
        • 2 years ago

        This point. 2200W/120V = 18.3A so that’s a dedicated 20A circuit just for the tower.

          • UberGerbil
          • 2 years ago

          True, but per the article and the image of the label, it expects a 200 – 240V input. Essentially what you’ve got is the same load as a small electric clothes dryer, to give your bitcoin that fresh laundry scent.

          • xeridea
          • 2 years ago

          But it only runs on 240v, so half the amps. Also, at full load, 2200W PSU takes more than 2200W. Assuming 91% efficiency (full load less efficient), it may take up to 2400W, or 10A at 240V assuming no voltage drop between panel and outlet. Of course it isn’t recommended to run PSU at max output 24/7, I would recommend 80% or less.

          • LeoScott
          • 2 years ago

          Most US power isn’t really 120V and when you start drawing that kind of power the voltage drops because the wires and every connection uses some of the power/voltage. I worked on copy machines for years and would monitor outlets when I had problems. When the heaters, high current users in the machines, kicked in even on a good circuit the voltage would drop 3-5 volts.

      • albundy
      • 2 years ago

      better luck next time.

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