Dell EMC grows AMD server options with an Epyc trio

Ryzen's been on the market a while now, but systems based on AMD's Epyc server processors have been a little harder to come by—particularly if you wanted them from a major vendor. It doesn't get a whole lot more "major" than Dell EMC, though. Along with AMD, that group just announced three new rack-mounted server units based on AMD's massive microprocessors: the PowerEdge R6415, R7415, and R7425.

Dell EMC PowerEdge R7415 and R7425 2U rack servers

The R6415 is a slim 1U chassis, while the R7415 and R7425 are 2U designs. The top-end R7425 is a dual-socket machine. The R7415 and R6415 are meanwhile single-socket systems, but all three can take any Epyc CPU, including the top-end 32-core 180-W Epyc 7601. Thanks to Epyc's 8-channel DDR4 memory controller, the single-socket setups can take up to 2 TB of memory, while the R7425 can take 4 TB. 

Dell EMC PowerEdge R6415 1U rack server

Whichever system you choose, you've got 128 lanes of PCIe to play with. For the R6415, it looks like most of that bandwidth will be going to network and storage hardware, as it can have up to ten 2.5" NVMe drives. The thicker 2U models can be configured with risers accomodating either three PCIe x16 cards on the R7415, or six on the R7425.  Alternatively, you can stuff 24 2.5" drives or 12 3.5" drives in either 2U machine. As usual, Dell offers extensive options to customize your configuration for your specific workload.

We won't get into all the nitty-gritty details of the hardware configurations here; if you're curious, you can click the links ahead for the full specifications. AMD says Dell EMC's new PowerEdges are available worldwide today. The 1U R6415 starts at $2179, the 2U R7415 starts at $2349, and the 2U dual-socket R7425 begins at $3819.

Comments closed
    • Waco
    • 2 years ago

    WOO! I know what I’m buying next. I’ve been waiting for lots of PCIe lanes (without a crazy price tag) for years. 😀

    These will make badass Lustre OSS/MDS nodes. 🙂

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    It’s not an Epyc Trio.

    It’s an Epyc Trilogy.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 2 years ago

      Nicely done, chuck.

      • Waco
      • 2 years ago

      Epyc Trylogy?

      • K-L-Waster
      • 2 years ago

      So when they add a 4th and 5th model does it become the Epyc Saga or “The increasingly inaccurately named Epyc Trilogy”?

        • alloyD
        • 2 years ago

        Epyc Saga until Disney buys them and they can start making “…An Epyc Story” entries.

    • jts888
    • 2 years ago

    I wonder how AMD has taken the recent RAM price climbing after they worked so hard to support gobs of DIMMs in Epyc. A fully loaded 4TB 2P box would easily cost more than the cars most people drive. (And an unspecified multiple times what my last car cost me.)

      • derFunkenstein
      • 2 years ago

      Well, that doesn’t affect AMD more than it does Intel (or vice versa) so I’m sure it’s a non-factor. Either you’re building a server with sufficient memory or you’re not.

        • jts888
        • 2 years ago

        Broadwell supports adding DIMMs in increments of 4 per socket, Epyc really needs a minimum of 8, and Skylake sits between at 6. If you want to argue about going below 1DPC average, Skylake supports 4/6 and 2/6 setups vs. Epyc’s 4/8 (any less than one channel per Zeppelin would perform disastrously if it’s even allowed).

        For low end server builds, there’s simply more flexibility with Xeon, and that’s before you even begin to look at Xeon-D.

          • Waco
          • 2 years ago

          For low end, yes, but if you need PCIe lanes, it’s still cheaper even with expensive DIMM counts.

      • Krogoth
      • 2 years ago

      The memory price hike only affected customer-tier SKUs. Workstation/Server SKUs remain pretty static.

      • curtisb
      • 2 years ago

      Someone who needs that amount of RAM isn’t going to be concerned with the fact that it costs more than a vehicle does. Even moderately configured servers with certified/tested hardware, toolless designs, engineered chassis, and good maintenance contracts cost a pretty penny.

      As far as pricing goes, some servers can even run the cost of a nice home.

        • Krogoth
        • 2 years ago

        The pricing of a high-end server is much closer to an new car. You start running into home pricing range when you are dealing with big irons/clusters.

          • Anonymous Coward
          • 2 years ago

          I do miss my hands on actual high performance hardware, but its still pretty fun to [i<]rent[/i<] massive boxes from those cloudy guys.

          • curtisb
          • 2 years ago

          I can easily configure a Dell PowerEdge R740 [i<]with my education discount[/i<] at greater than $100K, and I wouldn't consider that big iron. Something like I configured--which admittedly does have 1.5TB of RAM, but doesn't address storage or GPU's--would be moderately configured for VDI. And ideally you would want two in a cluster. So double that, then add another $100K minimum for an enterprise SAN...and no, Synology or FreeNAS homegrown doesn't count. You could include the storage in each node and share that across them rather than going with a SAN, but that adds complexity for the minimal amount of money it saves.

            • Krogoth
            • 2 years ago

            Perhaps if you configured some overpriced abomination that’s poorly spec. You shouldn’t be budgeting anywhere near $100K for a single 1U/2U server unless you got a highly specialized workload and rackmount space is at a very steep premium.

            • curtisb
            • 2 years ago

            LOL…ok. It’s not like I do this for a living or anything…

            Apparently you don’t understand VDI, or datacenter convergence, or enterprise licensing costs. That configuration I did included Windows Server 2016 Datacenter and dual 28C/56T CPU’s…that’s 56 cores that have to be licensed. And no…VMware wouldn’t make that any cheaper.

            Rackspace, power, cooling…they’re all at a premium these days. You have to consider the TCO. Do I spec 10 moderate servers at $10K each or two powerful servers at $50K each? That’s a no brainer…the TCO on two servers is going to be much less. The more servers you run, the more power, the more cooling (and hence, even more power), the more management, the more network ports…the list goes on.

            I have over 50 virtual machines that run across two servers in a Hyper-V cluster. Mine weren’t anywhere near $50K each, but our workload isn’t that great, either. I know how to get what’s needed and still keep it in budget.

            Those two servers don’t come anywhere close to the configuration I did for the R740, but they don’t need to. My configuration was to make a point that it can be done for a server that requires the workload, and can easily be done outside of a “big iron” scenario. If you’re running 100 VDI sessions you definitely don’t ‘want resource contention, so you spec for it. The more you spec, the more the price goes up. At that many VDI sessions, the TCO on two highly spec’ed 2U servers is going to be less than 100 workstations…that will still require server and storage resources.

            And BTW, that 1.5TB of RAM was over $40K by itself…make that 4TB and you’re well beyond the cost of a home. Virtualize SQL Server, Oracle, Exchange, even MySQL…they’ll all take as much RAM as you’re willing to throw at them.

            • Waco
            • 2 years ago

            Krogoth…this is not your day job. A $100K server isn’t even crazy talk these days…

      • K-L-Waster
      • 2 years ago

      Realistically, with projects that use servers in this class you are looking at total project budgets in the hundreds of thousands to millions of dollars.

      Delaying or jeopardizing a project of that scale because of an extra 5 – 10K in RAM cost isn’t good business. Yes it increases your cost per server, but at the end of the day that’s a very small slice of the overall project cost.

        • Waco
        • 2 years ago

        Depends on the application. RAM prices drove up the cost of a recent procurement I was working on by nearly 20% for the whole cluster…

          • K-L-Waster
          • 2 years ago

          I get that, but let’s lay this out:

          * There’s a new project with a total budget of $1M of which $100K is new servers
          * RAM prices push the cost of the servers up to $120K
          * IT goes back to the business sponsor and tells them they need to cancel the project because they’re $20K over budget

          If your business sponsors are anything like mine, they’re going to blow a gasket at this point. “You’re jeopardizing my entire project over $20K?!?!!?”

            • Waco
            • 2 years ago

            If it’s a $1M project, you’re right, it’s in the noise if only $100k is servers ($100k in servers like this is only a handful of them).

            If it’s a $10M project and $9M is servers, an extra $1-2M is going to cause serious heartache and downsizing of the rest of the servers to compensate.

      • shank15217
      • 2 years ago

      Just bought 13 AMD epyc based servers, 128 threads 2TB of memory each, 100GB nics, came in around 450K

        • jts888
        • 2 years ago

        Out of curiosity, how close to an even mil would a 4TB specced set have run?

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