Windows 10 Build 17093 adds per-app multi-GPU settings and more

The latest Windows Build 17093 has gone out to those brave users on the Insider Fast Ring update track. The most recent build includes all kinds of new features for power users and regular Joes alike, so let's just dive right in. 

Game bar with dark theme

The Windows team touts another round of improvements to the Game Bar. The bar now includes toggles for the PC's camera and microphone, as well as a clock for checking the time during a long gaming session in a darkened room. Users can pick from a light or dark version, or let the bar take its color cues from the Windows theme.

Microsoft addressed privacy concerns with the Diagnostic Data Viewer in build 17083, and the company continues down that path in the latest build. Users can now navigate through the settings app to delete the diagnostic data associated with the current device. The feature doesn't currently work, but Redmond says it will before the Redstone 4 update is released to the general public.

Microsoft's developers have also worked on bringing HDR video support to a wider array of machines. Users watching HDR video on a laptop might want to approach the feature with caution because HDR playback uses the full brightness of the display. To help with that conundrum, build 17093 includes an option to force the display to keep its usual display brightness level when playing HDR video.

Continuing on the graphics front, the new build has new graphics settings for systems with multiple graphics cards. By default, Windows will select the appropriate graphics adapter to use for any particular application. The new panel will allow users to override the OS' choice of GPU for an app and directly specify whether to use the most efficient adapter or the one with the highest performance. The settings picked in the new "Advanced graphics settings" page will override any picks made in the AMD or Nvidia control panels, though the application or game in question makes the ultimate choice of GPU.

Forgetful users of Windows 10 S could benefit from a new security option that uses Microsoft's Authenticator smartphone app instead of a password. We aren't sure what to make of this particular new feature, given the rumors that Windows 10 S is heading to the scrapheap. Our best guess is that the password-less mode will be available when the rumored "S Mode" is activated.

Microsoft's Edge browser got a fullscreen display mode (accessible with the F11 key) in the Windows Creators Update, and the latest preview build adds the ability to access the address bar while remaining in this mode. The browser also gains the ability to print "certain types of webpages" in a clutter-free mode without ads and other unnecessary page elements.

The developers also worked on a streamlined Bluetooth device support, improved multi-language support, updated app permissions, and new eye-tracking features. The company has also renamed Windows Defender to Windows Security. As ever, some known bugs remain, including a pause of up to 90 minutes at the 88% mark during the installation process.

The new build contains tons of other small features and bug fixes. Those interested can click on over to the release notes for more information. The notes don't provide a rollout day for Redstone 4, but its Bug Bash initiative ends on February 11. We'd guess that we don't have to wait that much longer until the update is out.

Comments closed
    • Voldenuit
    • 2 years ago

    Game Bar. Ew.

    • lilbuddhaman
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<] Users can now navigate through the settings app to delete the diagnostic data associated with the current device. [b<]The feature doesn't currently work[/b<][/quote<] the jokes write themselves

      • albundy
      • 2 years ago

      tough crowd?

    • Bauxite
    • 2 years ago

    But have they fixed all the things they screwed up with game bar, fullscreen “optimization” and who knows what else causing stuttering that was not present before?

    • Usacomp2k3
    • 2 years ago

    I personally love the Microsoft authenticator app, as long as my phone is working and has service and is on me (which is 99% of the time). Doing that as a 2nd factor for computer login would make sense.

      • willmore
      • 2 years ago

      Does it work with any of the other many time based password apps? I don’ t want to install yet another authenticator app just for this. There is a standard for this after all.

      • DoomGuy64
      • 2 years ago

      2nd factor authentication shouldn’t replace the first factor, so it doesn’t sound like 2nd factor, and remote/cloud login just appears like it is begging to be compromised. If not by hackers, Microsoft and the NSA will definitely have full access to your system through this authentication method.

    • Derfer
    • 2 years ago

    Ughh. Another notable windows update. Time for my settings and homegroup to be destroyed again.

      • Shobai
      • 2 years ago

      And for programs installed to a different hard drive to be duplicated in the start menu, with one set orphaned…

        • psuedonymous
        • 2 years ago

        Now THAT’s one I’ve never had happen to me before.

      • Zizy
      • 2 years ago

      Don’t worry, homegroup is also going away in this update.

    • EndlessWaves
    • 2 years ago

    “Microsoft’s developers have also worked on bringing HDR video support to a wider array of machines. Users watching HDR video on a laptop might want to approach the feature with caution because HDR playback uses the full brightness of the display. To help with that conundrum, build 17093 includes an option to force the display to keep its usual display brightness level when playing HDR video.”

    Providing user compensation for a bad implementation is dangerous road to go down this early in a technology’s development.

    Hopefully Microsoft can evolve it into the ambient brightness control that’ll be needed for HDR10 to be usable outside of a controlled brightness environment.

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 2 years ago

    So, can I plug my monitor into my iGPU on my Windows 10 box and the OS will swap around the GPU as needed? How does one configure that, or is that what this is going on about?

      • morphine
      • 2 years ago

      You can select the GPU to use per-app, not for the OS itself—at least as far as Microsoft’s post describes it.

        • arunphilip
        • 2 years ago

        I’ve the same question that DragonDaddyBear asked. On my desktop, if I have a monitor connected to the iGPU, can I specify that the dGPU is to be used for specific games, and Windows will pipe the graphics output of the gGPU via the iGPU’s output ports?

          • Shobai
          • 2 years ago

          I wouldn’t think you’d have the same mux-ing type set up on desktop motherboards as laptops; you’d be looking for Nvidia’s Optimus and the like, I think

          [Edit: thanks, phone keyboard…]

            • DragonDaddyBear
            • 2 years ago

            I thought Optimus was mostly dead in newer stuff. Any reading someone has would be really helpful. I’m not finding much.

            • DancinJack
            • 2 years ago

            BLAH DERPITY DERP

            • Redocbew
            • 2 years ago

            Yep, I’m thinking that’s the whole reason why this is even possible. If the OS already has control instead of the GPU driver, then this widget exposes that control to the user.

      • NTMBK
      • 2 years ago

      I suspect that you would want to plug the display into the dGPU, right? Surely copying the framebuffer from the dGPU memory to the IGP memory (so that it can be output to the monitor) will add a little bit of latency, similar to using a Thunderbolt GPU on a laptop’s internal display.

    • tipoo
    • 2 years ago

    The shift to GPUs acting more like CPU cores in the last Windows 10 build has been pretty good to me, rather than turning one or the other on or off. When one GPU is doing heavy lifting another application just goes on uninterrupted, since GPUs aren’t great at context switching otherwise.

    • arunphilip
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]the new build has new graphics settings for systems with multiple graphics cards. By default, Windows will select the appropriate graphics adapter to use for any particular application. [/quote<] So how does this work, in the case of the screenshot that shows both an Intel IGP and an AMD PCI-E card? Which display output port is to be connected to the monitors? The IGP-driven motherboard ports, or the ports on the dedicated card?

      • LostCat
      • 2 years ago

      I believe in most laptops the display goes through the iGPU by default for whatever power saving tech is in use. In most desktops it’d just default to whatever is connected.

    • Neutronbeam
    • 2 years ago

    Krogothing this. Everyone knows that the Slow Ring is the ring that rules them all.

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