Samsung PM1643 SSD stacks chips on chips for 30.72 TB of NAND

In the realm of the consumer-focused SSDs we normally cover around these parts, a capacity of 2 TB is generally considered to be pretty large. Spinny metal hard drive capacities top out in the mid-teens these days. Samsung's latest PM1643 12 Gbps SAS SSD, on the other hand, stores a whopping 30.72 TB spread out across 512 of the silicon maker's 64-layer, 512-Gb V-NAND flash chips. The company's previous capacity king was March 2016's 15.36 TB PM1633a.

 

The 512 flash chips are packed into 32 16-die packages. As long as we're talking about big numbers, the drive's 40 GB of DRAM cache is also worthy of attention. Samsung says the PM1643's enormous cache is the first to use DRAM chips stacked using through-silicon vias (TSVs). The drive's four 10 GB TSV packages are built from interconnected 8 Gb DDR4 chips. Samsung says the stacked DRAM lets it give over more of the drive's volume to NAND.

The manufacturer says that performance levels are nearly twice as fast as those of the PM1633a. The company claims random read speeds of up to 400,000 IOPS and random writes as fast as 50,000 IOPS. Sequential reads could hit a claimed 2100 MB/s, and sequential writes could run at up to 1700 MB/s. Both sequential figures are quite a bit higher than we're used to seeing from consumer-level SATA SSDs, which are limited by the 6 Gbps SATA interface. Samsung says the drive can endure one drive write per day for the duration of its five-year warranty—around 55 PB of total writes.

Samsung says it started manufacturing 30.72 TB PM1643 drives in January and will pad out the lineup with 15.36 TB, 3.84 TB, 1.92 TB, 960 GB and 800 GB models later this year. The drives are aimed at the data centers of large businesses, so don't expect to see them in Newegg's product listings any time soon. The company didn't provide pricing information, but for a sense of scale, the 15.36 TB PM1633a costs over $11,000 from channel sources.

Comments closed
    • moose17145
    • 2 years ago

    Much want… I mean I totally do not have a need for a drive like this… or even a 12gbps SAS port for that matter… but that does not stop the “want” from being strong…

    • Kougar
    • 2 years ago

    Wouldn’t a 12Gb SAS interface be a huge bottleneck to a drive with 40GB of DRAM cache? The thing is more like a ramdrive in a lot of respects.

    • Kougar
    • 2 years ago

    Wow. At 40GB this thing has more in common with a RAMdrive than it does with consumer SSDs.

    • pirate_panda
    • 2 years ago

    I’d sure love to see what these look like opened up.

    • Bauxite
    • 2 years ago

    I’ll take a dozen or so, thanks. Got enough lanes for ’em 😉

    • hubick
    • 2 years ago

    I’d like six of these please. They’ll make a nice little upgrade from the magnetic drives I have hooked up my little Xeon-D ITX board w 10Gbe interface 🙂

    • willmore
    • 2 years ago

    U.2 interfaced?

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      Ask Bono.

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 2 years ago

        Not U 2, chuck.

        Did I do it????

      • DPete27
      • 2 years ago

      It would appear so. (from the picture of the drive laying down)

        • Jeff Kampman
        • 2 years ago

        It’s actually 12 Gbps SAS.

          • smilingcrow
          • 2 years ago

          Which is in the article which made me wonder how it can manage 2100 MB/s!
          Is it dual ported?

            • willmore
            • 2 years ago

            Yeah, I don’t know a ton about SAS–I left the enterprise setting before it came about. Ultra320 SCSI was the hottest thing I remember.

            • Waco
            • 2 years ago

            It has to be dual ported for reach such speeds – and you’d want it dual ported for redundant access paths anyway.

    • JosiahBradley
    • 2 years ago

    If it doesn’t fit in a conventional 2.5 inch SAS backplane given the thickness is it really taking the record away from the 3.5inch variant?

      • Waco
      • 2 years ago

      Looks like a standard 15mm 2.5″ drive to me.

        • JosiahBradley
        • 2 years ago

        The connector is what is throwing me off I guess as that doesn’t match the standard power/data connectors on the servers I use that have SAS3 backplanes.

          • Waco
          • 2 years ago

          It appears that there is an extra connector on the other side of the drive (based on the arrow and label orientation). Perhaps for diagnostics?

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]As long as we're talking about big numbers, the drive's 40 GB of DRAM cache is also worthy of attention. [/quote<] When the DRAM cache on the SSD exceeds your total system RAM by 8GB, you know it's going to be one of those days.

      • DPete27
      • 2 years ago

      Napkin math: 40GB cache / 1,700MB/s write = 20 seconds to fill the cache. (assuming no writes being offloaded to the NAND during that time)

      • emvath79
      • 2 years ago

      You’ve got 32 GB of ram? Geez richy rich. I’d have to take out a second mortgage to get that much at today’s prices.

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        I bought it in 2013 before the West was won and the RAM barrons fenced out the cowboys.

        • Kougar
        • 2 years ago

        Bought two kits of 32GB DDR3 RAM back in the day. The total cost of both combined might buy a single 32GB kit of 3200Mhz DDR4 today. Ouch.

        Still planning to skip the DDR4 generation entirely, DDR5 systems will be out in two years or so.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This