Sail the Sea of Thieves with Radeon 18.2.3 drivers

The fine folks at AMD's Radeon Technologies Group have been busy bees. The latest Radeon Software release is numbered 18.2.3 (as it's the third release this month) and has a nice pack of performance patches for Final Fantasy XII The Zodiac Age and Sea of Thieves. There's also the usual bunch of bugfixes, too.

Sea of Thieves

Sea of Thieves might not be coming out until March 19, but the game's already had several closed beta events. Radeon users looking forward to the title can additionally look forward to a 29% performance uplift on Radeon RX Vega cards, and an even larger 39% improvement on Radeon RX 580 cards, compared to the previous driver version. Final Fantasy XII The Zodiac Age sees smaller improvements, but 13% faster performance for RX Vega 56 cards and 20% faster performance on Radeon RX 580 cards is nothing to cry about. This release also adds support for Hidden Path's VR RTS Brass Tactics, although AMD didn't say anything further about it.

Brass Tactics

FreeSync users can rejoice, as the variable refresh-rate tech should no longer engage when watching videos in Google Chrome. FreeSync should also be a little more reliable in fullscreen games on systems with multiple displays. Neither using Radeon Enhanced Sync nor playing a game in Vulkan should cause flickering in the Radeon Overlay anymore. Corruption in the fog or lighting in Fortnite should be a thing of the past. Middle-earth: Shadow of War and For Honor should stop crashing on launch, too. Finally, Radeon Relive clips should be free of audio distortion now.

Final Fantasy XII The Zodiac Age

As usual, a few problems remain. That persnickety issue with "extended periods of use on system configurations using 12 GPUs for compute workloads" is still around. World of Final Fantasy may not display water texture correctly, and Destiny 2 may crash on some cards based on first-generation GCN tech (like the Radeon HD 7970). Radeon Overlay may not show in some games, and Radeon Chill's hotkey may not reset properly when you restore Radeon Settings to defaults. Finally, FFmpeg may not output H.264 video correctly.

If you're after the latest Radeon Software release, you can click here for the release notes, which also include download links.

Comments closed
    • WileECoyote
    • 2 years ago

    I can’t. I have windows 8.1

    • gmskking
    • 2 years ago

    New game. New driver. Repeat.

    • Lore
    • 2 years ago

    With the ability to sell all the cards they can produce to miners no matter how bad they are at gaming, how long will AMD have the motivation to give the gamers new and better drivers ?

      • Puiucs
      • 2 years ago

      what are you talking about? AMD has been beating NVidia for a while now when it comes to driver stability and bugs. they stepped up their game a lot. and beyond the very high end side, AMD has been very competitive, the problem is availability and market prices 🙁 .

      • jts888
      • 2 years ago

      They desperately need a way to get the primitive shader/discard subsystem in Vega (or Navi) to be utilized by existing shaders, or else they will maintain their massive bottleneck. Vega has the same geometry throughput (4 triangle fragments/clock of up to 4*4px size each) as Polaris and Fiji, which was already seen at the time as notably underpowered compared to the 980 Ti in that regard.

      It’s hard for me to see how AMD will accomplish this [i<]massive[/i<] compiler effort when the number of gamers with Vega cards has to be miniscule. The only other chance AMD has to keep their desktop (non-APU) graphics market alive is to spin new silicon with higher fixed function throughput for traditional APIs.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 2 years ago

    Let’s say AMD tried to “fix” the 12-plus card issue and “accidentally” broke configs of more than three cards other than Radeon Pro. Would that make mining on AMD less attractive?

    No, I suppose not, since the old drivers are floating around. Hmm. :-/

      • K-L-Waster
      • 2 years ago

      Much as the non-miners around here might not like to hear it, doing that would actually be kinda evil. Basically it would be saying “those customers who bought our hardware shouldn’t be allowed to use it because they aren’t the right kind of customer.”

      I think we’d all hate to be on the receiving end of that kind of logic.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 2 years ago

        Sure, that line of reasoning makes sense. Still, a boy can dream, can’t he? 🙂

      • jts888
      • 2 years ago

      If the mining variants relevant to GPUs are limited by bandwidth and/or ALU throughput alone, I can’t grasp why AMD and the Korean DRAM firms haven’t come out with cheaper low-capacity/height HBM stacks.

      AMD becomes far less (or un-?) constrained by memory availability, and the vendors can start selling dud assembled 4GB stacks as 1-2GB part for mining cards.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This