Report: Windows 10 Fall Creators Update adoption speeds past 85%

Microsoft's sometimes-aggressive data collection policies received criticism, but if AdDuplex's Windows 10 Fall Creators Update adoption figures are accurate, the software giant might be doing something constructive with all the ones and zeroes gleaned from customer PCs. The "cross-promotion network for Windows Phone and Windows applications" reports that 85% of all PCs running Windows 10 have upgraded to the Fall Creators Update, which started rolling out to customer machines at the end of October. For comparison's sake, the previous Creators Update had reached about 66% of Windows 10 devices at the four-month mark, accoridng to AdDuplex.

Source: AdDuplex

The April 2017 release of the Creators Update had its share of issues, most notably an incompatibility with devices based on Intel's Clover Trail Atom SoCs. All in all, Microsoft didn't make the Creators Update available to all client PCs until four months after the April 11 initial release. The initial Windows 10 release still has 0.5% market share according to the report, but we think part of that figure could be justified by OS installs from old media.

Source: AdDuplex

AdDuplex goes on to report that some countries, including Canada and Germany, have crested 90% penetration for the Fall Creators Update. A few countries are closer to the 60% mark, including historical update laggards China and India.

The optimist's view is that Microsoft is learning from experience in rolling out its semi-annual OS updates and that the rumored Spring Creators Update will be the smoothest yet. Pessimists will probably just point out the Fall Creators Update's relatively meager feature improvements and say that small changes typically proceed smoother than larger overhauls. We'll keep our eye on future Windows 10 updates.

Comments closed
    • not@home
    • 2 years ago

    Now that Classic Shell is no longer being developed, I have disabled all updates on my laptop (the only PC I have with Win 10). I will not be installing any more creators updates, just the security updates manually. That is unless someone else takes over updating Classic Shell. The developer did put it on GitHub I believe.

      • bthylafh
      • 2 years ago

      For how long do you plan to hold your breath so you’ll get your way? Microsoft will eventually stop providing security updates to whichever build of Win10 you’ve got. In the meantime Classic Shell’s start menu will probably still work, and there are many alternatives out there:

      [url<]https://alternativeto.net/software/classicshell/?license=free[/url<]

    • odizzido
    • 2 years ago

    W10 is still inferior to 7 for me so I don’t use it. Fighting with my OS is low on my list of things I wish to do.

      • End User
      • 2 years ago

      Wut?

      I don’t fight with Windows 10 and I hate Windows 10. Upgrade already!

        • odizzido
        • 2 years ago

        I don’t see W10 as an upgrade for my uses. It removes functionality and control while offering better support for hardware I don’t have. Nothing but negatives and ads and software installs I don’t want for me.

          • End User
          • 2 years ago

          Ads?
          What functionality was removed?

            • odizzido
            • 2 years ago

            Yeah ads for office or games in the start menu, pictures for sale when the computer wakes up from sleep. People getting pestered for one drive subscriptions which they didn’t ask for and don’t want. That sort of thing.

            As to functionality the biggest thing for me is the removal of live boot drive mirroring. The removal of wireless priorities is also annoying(in windows 8, I assume they didn’t add it back in in 10 but I haven’t looked). These are the ones that personally hit me. One thing that really bothers me is the loss of control of updates but as a W7 user at home it hasn’t really had any impact on me yet.

            As to what I hear from W10 users people constantly having to redo all their settings in some sort of war of pestering MS started. I imagine they’re just hoping people will get sick of switching settings all the time and just give up and accept the ones MS wants them to have. I’ve also had an abnormally high number of people I play games with suddenly disconnect because their computers reset. I guess middle of game sessions are a good time to do updates or something.

            • End User
            • 2 years ago

            I’ve not seen ads in my start menu. I’ve removed all but a few tiles so that may have helped.

            I’ve not seen “pictures for sale”.

            I have an Office 365 subscription so that probably dealt with any Office related prompts.

            I have a tight reign on updates. My system won’t restart when I am in the middle of a game.

            I’m using Windows 10 Pro.

            Live boot drive mirroring – [url=https://www.howtogeek.com/109380/how-to-use-windows-8s-storage-spaces-to-mirror-combine-drives/<]Is this it[/url<]?

            • gmskking
            • 2 years ago

            Since you have not seen it I guess it doesn’t exist.

            • odizzido
            • 2 years ago

            No. W10 does have mirroring but it will not allow you to create a bootable mirror like in W7

      • Meadows
      • 2 years ago

      I, too, regularly use banking software from 15 years ago. No way I’m going to upgrade now! </sarcasm>

      • gmskking
      • 2 years ago

      Completely agree. Windows 7 Master Race.

    • setaG_lliB
    • 2 years ago

    Every time Microsoft releases a major Win10 update, I hook up my eSATA HDD, install the new build, and hope that I like it. Each new build does seem slightly better than the last, which is promising. The problem is, not even the Fall Creator’s Update comes close to the perfection that is Window 7. So, after about a week of test driving the latest edition of 10, I always wind up going back to reliable, efficient 7.

    I keep hoping that by 2020 Microsoft ditches that Windows 10…”thing” and writes a true successor to Win7. A stable, no-nonsense OS built for desktop computing and nothing else, yet with full support for modern technologies like high DPI, wide color gamut displays. Oh, and how about a multi-threaded UI that can also take full advantage of the GPU? Even in Windows 10, some parts of the UI are still clearly performed by the CPU (and on one core, no less). It’s quite noticeable, even on brand new machines based on entry level processors.

    I would gladly pay $150-200 for a new version of Windows that TRULY improves the user experience. I did back in 2009, after all!

      • odizzido
      • 2 years ago

      Wouldn’t that be nice. Or windows can die. I’d be happy with that too TBH.

        • moose17145
        • 2 years ago

        And what would replace it might I ask?

          • odizzido
          • 2 years ago

          For me personally I would be good with some form of linux. I want steamOS to win big so it can get devs to stop using directX, and valve is big enough to potentially do it.

          For people who only click on their browser button you could replace it with anything really. Just look how popular tablets are and they can’t do anything well.

          • heinsj24
          • 2 years ago

          VMS v5 was the best OS, ever!

          Start there.

      • moog
      • 2 years ago

      Win10 is more efficient and stable than Win7

        • sweatshopking
        • 2 years ago

        Don’t bother disputing him with facts. This is an os discussion.

          • End User
          • 2 years ago

          When have you ever been concerned with facts?

    • albundy
    • 2 years ago

    wait a minute, they missed a version in that graph! the yarrrr edition!

    • Waco
    • 2 years ago

    I wonder if they’ll ever fix the “network mounted filesystem not available” at boot time.

    Every single time I boot my laptop, I get a warning about how it couldn’t mount my NAS. If I had a window open to it, it’ll bomb out. Yet, first open of a file or directory? Yeah, it works. It’s been this way since Windows 7 on any wireless connection (or a slow to initialize wired connection).

      • GrimDanfango
      • 2 years ago

      It’s been that way since Win95. If they haven’t gotten around to fixing it in 20 years, I’m not holding out much hope it’ll happen any time soon.

        • End User
        • 2 years ago

        Sad!

      • Ari Atari
      • 2 years ago

      Ya, and it seems like a simple fix too: just wait to check a little longer and BAM! no more false positives. Glad someone else is a little annoyed too. Too bad like Grim said it most likely will never get fixed…

    • Arvald
    • 2 years ago

    No surprise. I killed the update the first 3 times it tried to do it… 3rd time it had taken control away from me. I powered off to stop it.
    The last time I walk away and came back to my PC rebooting from the update.
    M$ forced this down people’s throats.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 2 years ago

      Resistance is futile. You will be updated.

      • bthylafh
      • 2 years ago

      You’ll have to update to a newer build at some point because MS will stop putting out security patches for older ones. I think 1607 is currently the oldest Win10 build still getting security fixes.

        • usernam3
        • 2 years ago

        Nope. They relented and provide updates even for 1511 build (at least the enterprise version). Because as much as MS would like everyone to believe that constant upgrade mill was the greatest thing since slice bread (not like there was no dissent there either), no business can spend all resources testing their own toolset against Windows and features nobody asked for.

      • hassan272
      • 2 years ago

      Try this to prevent Windows10-Pro from updating,

      Open Command-Prompt > type “gpedit” > Press “Enter”.

      Go to :
      Computer Configuration -> Administrative Templates -> Windows Components -> Windows Update

      Then set the “Configure Automatic Updates” setting to “Disabled”.

        • bthylafh
        • 2 years ago

        And now you’ve got a computer that’s going to be easy meat for the bad guys to crack, because it’s got security holes that will never be fixed.

        Don’t do that unless the computer’s always offline.

          • kuttan
          • 2 years ago

          Have you ever heard a home computer got hacked ?? Nobody bothers to hack those home/personal computers. For malware defense you can use an Anti Malware or lock down configurations using Comodo, AppGuard, Voodooshield etc.

            • bthylafh
            • 2 years ago

            Great Cthulhu, you’re being serious, aren’t you.

            You ignorant child.

            • Arvald
            • 2 years ago

            Actually yes I have. It got past virus and malware scanners and my sister ended up just getting a new computer after.
            The reason was they had taken advice and turned off all updates.

            • K-L-Waster
            • 2 years ago

            Please look up the term “Botnet” and report back to the class when you have a more informed view of things.

            Then look up the term “ransomware”.

        • Arvald
        • 2 years ago

        Bad idea. I just want upgrades to stop until I want them. Not windows.update completely.
        It is not like MS stopped sending out other updates to the pre-creators update.

          • hassan272
          • 2 years ago

          If you require Windows to download updates but notify the user whether or not to install the updates.

          Try this :

          Open Command-Prompt > type “gpedit” > Press “Enter”.

          Go to :
          Computer Configuration -> Administrative Templates -> Windows Components -> Windows Update

          Then set the “Configure Automatic Updates” setting to either:
          “3 – Auto download and notify for install”
          OR
          “2 – Notify for download and notify for install”

          Now you have control over Windows. Not the other way around.

      • aggies11
      • 2 years ago

      No kidding. I’m not surprised these stats are that high (if not, higher).

      I have a Living Room (TV) PC that I primarily use for VR and media. So it doesn’t have an internet connection. I don’t use it to go online so I don’t need it to be up to date. (Download media/games and move them over from other machines in the home that have internet).

      I have the windows update and associated services forcibly disabled just in case (and to make sure the majority of system resources are free for the games etc, since windows 10 loves to go off and randomly consume CPU/disk on it’s own).

      Despite this, I had to connect the machine to the net for 30mins a couple of weeks ago, not thinking anything of it. A couple days later machine performance was slow I noticed, and after some digging I noticed it had done the creators update, and also updated my video drivers. The update of course took out items in the documents folder (despite supposedly leaving all the user folders alone). Was a PITA to roll back, but I did anyway as I had everything set up for the games/performance I use and don’t have the need to change anything at the moment.

      So even despite my best efforts to keep updates off, disabling services, and a machine that isn’t connected to the net and maybe gets a connection once a month for 30mins or so at a time, it still found a way to force itself onto the machine. I’ll have to give them credit, they certainly are persistent.

      So now out of paranoia I have to recheck all my settings once a week or so, to see if those services magically have turned themselves back on again.

    • GrimDanfango
    • 2 years ago

    Translation – “Our mandatory automatic update process has successfully crushed all but 15% of resistance”

    • PrincipalSkinner
    • 2 years ago

    After the latest update, I have to remove and install drivers for LAN adapter on each boot to make it work. Thanks MS.

    • DPete27
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]85% of all PCs running Windows 10 have upgraded to the Fall Creators Update[/quote<] Translation: 15% of all PCs running Windows 10 haven't been turned on/off in the past 4 months.

      • Ninjitsu
      • 2 years ago

      If they haven’t they’ll probably be forced to 😛

    • rechicero
    • 2 years ago

    Now, If they’d be able to update the OS without messing with lots of programs I could be part of that 85% willingly instead of forced.

    PS: Is there a reason to delete the registry for several things (like my eHome remote for Kodi)? :-/

    • derFunkenstein
    • 2 years ago

    That’s all well and good, but [url=https://netmarketshare.com/operating-system-market-share.aspx?options=%7B%22filter%22%3A%7B%22%24and%22%3A%5B%7B%22deviceType%22%3A%7B%22%24in%22%3A%5B%22Desktop%2Flaptop%22%5D%7D%7D%5D%7D%2C%22dateLabel%22%3A%22Trend%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%22share%22%2C%22group%22%3A%22platformVersion%22%2C%22sort%22%3A%7B%22share%22%3A-1%7D%2C%22id%22%3A%22platformsDesktopVersions%22%2C%22dateInterval%22%3A%22Monthly%22%2C%22dateStart%22%3A%222017-02%22%2C%22dateEnd%22%3A%222018-01%22%2C%22segments%22%3A%22-1000%22%7D<]Netmarketshare says[/url<] Windows 7 still far outpaces Windows 10 installs in total.

      • sweatshopking
      • 2 years ago

      Not surprising given the corporate world. In a few years it’ll transition.

        • Sahrin
        • 2 years ago

        Remember that the initial release of Windows Phone was based on Win7, so that’s probably driving up those numbers sky-high too.

          • DancinJack
          • 2 years ago

          lololololol

          • curtisb
          • 2 years ago

          No…no it wasn’t. It was based on Windows CE.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 2 years ago

            Wikipedia says [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_Phone_7#Core<]you're both right[/url<], somehow. Windows Embedded Compact 7. Although I'm sure it has very little resemblance to desktop Win7.

        • RickyTick
        • 2 years ago

        My employer of about 8,000 people is currently updating everyone to Windows 10. I got a shiny new box just this morning.

    • ludi
    • 2 years ago

    “Our compelled update has reached 85% of compelled users.”

      • Voldenuit
      • 2 years ago

      “Meanwhile, 15% of users are stuck in a failed update or boot loop. Sucks to be them, haha.”

        • tay
        • 2 years ago

        This was me in the dying days of Windows 7. Stuck on an update that wouldn’t apply for over a year. I hope it doesn’t happen on Windows 10, because I’m too lazy to fix it.

    • bthylafh
    • 2 years ago

    We have a few machines that still have the gold release of Win10. Reason: we can’t afford a good, experienced sysadmin so updating between builds must be done by hand when the user won’t need the computer for a good fraction of a day, rather than rely on something like WSUS to push out the updates automatically. That takes long enough that it’s a bit faster to simply back up the user’s data, reimage, and reimport their data, but that’s obviously labor-intensive.

    For this reason all my new deployments are with the LTSB version of Win10. MS doesn’t recommend it for anything but special-purpose machines, but I don’t really care. The only thing LTSB really loses is Metro apps, which are a giant pain in the butt because they keep grabbing file associations unpredictably.

      • Airmantharp
      • 2 years ago

      I’d honestly like this on every machine I own.

      • usernam3
      • 2 years ago

      LTSB is the way to go. No s..tware and excruciatingly long 1st logins (where MS trolls you how much they liked to see you). No need to customize the build only to avoid the crud in the start menu. And much less invasive default telemetry/privacy policy.

        • MOSFET
        • 2 years ago

        Well, I liked what you wrote. Thumbs up.

    • rnalsation
    • 2 years ago

    For the life of me I can’t figure out why I am supposed to care about new build adoption rates.
    Is this just supposed to keep Win 10 in the news cycle? “Hey everybody, people use Win 10 and we want it to look like new installs are happening.”

      • derFunkenstein
      • 2 years ago

      It’s good for users of the Windows store, because it ensures everyone is able to use the latest APIs in their UWP apps.

      Well, it would be, if there were apps and users of the Windows store. 😆

      • Airmantharp
      • 2 years ago

      ‘Herd’ security is a pretty big reason.

      • Wirko
      • 2 years ago

      Or “Hey everybody, you can’t hide your Win 10 version from us, just as you can’t hide anything else.”

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