Intel Stratix 10 TX FPGA hooks up to 58G transceivers with EMIBs

Intel announced the next product in its Stratix 10 family of field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) this morning. The Stratix 10 TX family of network transceivers uses Intel's EMIB technology to integrate as many as five 58 Gbps transceiver modules alongside FPGAs comprising anywhere from 600K to 2.8 million programmable logic elements, according to Anandtech. Intel expects Stratix 10 TX chips to power networking devices for optical transport, perform network function virtualization, and find homes with cloud service providers and companies building 5G network infrastructure.

High bandwidth is apparently the name of the game in all of those potential applications, and Intel says the Stratix 10 TX can offer up to 144 transceiver lanes running at rates anywhere from 1 Gbps to 58 Gbps. Intel says the aggregate bandwidth from these connections should be sufficient to allow network architects to build out to 100G, 200G, or 400G delivery speeds. The Stratix 10 TX also supports 58G pulse amplitude modulation (PAM4) and 30 Gbps non-return-to-zero (NRZ) encoding schemes, allowing for backwards compatibility with existing network infrastructure. Intel says it'll also offer hardened intellectual property cores alongside the Stratix 10 TX, like 100 Gigabit Ethernet MACs and forward error correction (FEC). Next-generation network designers looking to take advantage of the Stratix 10 FPGA should be able to get their hands on those chips today.

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    • NTMBK
    • 2 years ago

    So what process are those transceivers built on? Presumably Intel are only doing this because they can’t build them on their own 14nm process…

    EDIT: Aha, Anandtech says they’re built on TSMC 16nm.

    • kvndoom
    • 2 years ago

    “Intel Stratix 10 TX FPGA hooks up to 58G transceivers with EMIBs”

    What?

    Do they speak English in What?

      • Neutronbeam
      • 2 years ago

      Impenetrable headlines are a key part of 1ee7speak, noob.

      (I didn’t understand the headline either–and the story even less. I miss the days of the “the quick silver Intel CPU outcycled the poky, overheated AMD CPU, then went home and had a nap.” THAT’S the kind of tech writing I can understand. Sigh. )

      [EDIT: added “of”]

        • nanoflower
        • 2 years ago

        Well, the EMIB should be familiar to anyone that read the articles about the Intel/Vega part as that was the most recent discussion of a part based on that technology. I’m not familiar with NZR encoding but I’m guessing it’s based on differences between the previous value instead of being based off the difference between zero and the current value with the assumption being the values with be lower with NZR encoding. Or so I’m assuming but it’s not an area I ever delved into.

        “Intel makes new part to handle high bandwidth network communication.”
        An accurate headline that communicates absolutely nothing to the people that might care. 😉

          • chuckula
          • 2 years ago

          Non-return to zero encoding is used all over the place and one advantage (of many) is that they don’t require a “rest” state where the channel returns to the “zero” signal level, which of course takes time (for the energy to dissipate) and can slow down communication. Additionally, both sides of the communication don’t even have to agree about what “zero” actually represents since the detection of changes from high to low signals is based more on the change in signal levels rather than the absolute level of the signal.

            • VillageIdiot
            • 2 years ago

            NRZ with 8b/10b encoding (or probably something better now) helps with clock recovery.

        • Wirko
        • 2 years ago

        Cores of hardened intellectual property = hard-boiled [url=https://www.buzzfeed.com/emofly/how-to-turn-cow-brains-into-a-delicious-fried-snac<]this[/url<]?

      • Pancake
      • 2 years ago

      English, motherfscker, do you speak it?

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]58G transceivers[/quote<] 5G? You want 5G? WE GOT 58G! SUCK IT QUALCOMM!

      • DancinJack
      • 2 years ago

      More seriously. Intel NEEDS to succeed with their upcoming LTE/5G modems. Qcomm needs to not be the only supplier for the US. Don’t muck it up, Intel.

        • shank15217
        • 2 years ago

        You mean BroadQualPepsiATnTCarlsJr

        • derFunkenstein
        • 2 years ago

        Getting them into iPhones will help, and rumor has it that Apple will go all-Intel with this year’s models.

          • DancinJack
          • 2 years ago

          Yeah, but they haven’t had the smoothest track record the past few years with their iPhone implementations. Here’s to hoping they worked closely enough with Apple this year to make things easier.

      • davidbowser
      • 2 years ago

      The obligatory Onion article

      [url<]https://goo.gl/MyrKAR[/url<] EDIT: filter for naughtiness

        • willmore
        • 2 years ago

        They need to update that article now that 7 blade razors are a thing.

      • ronch
      • 2 years ago

      Apparently calling every new incremental iteration of their big core CPUs ‘next generation’ wasn’t nearly good enough for Intel.

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