Cooler Master MA620P stacks fins on fins

Liquid cooling keeps getting easier and more affordable, but for some people (myself included), the reliability and lifespan of old-fashioned heatsink-and-fan combinations are hard to beat. Cooler Master says its dual-tower, dual-fan MasterAir MA620P cooler can deliver the performance of a liquid AIO unit without the worries about permeation, pump failure, or leaks. The styled top shrouds and included pair of RGB LED-bedazzled fans give it some style to flaunt, as well.  

As one would expect of a dual-tower CPU cooler with six copper heatpipes, the MA620P is a heavy unit, weighing in at 1.87 lbs (850 g) and measuring 6.5" tall, 4.8" wide, and 5.4" deep (16.5 x 12.2 x 13.7 cm) with the pair of included fans attached. Those fans spin at 600 to 1800 RPM and produce up to 53.4 CFM of airflow. Adding a third spinning air mover turns the cooler into a club sandwich-style affair and boosts that depth by another inch or so, depending on the fan's make and model.

Still on the subject of fans, the pair of MF120R RGB rotating air pushers packed with the MA620P have color-changing LED illumination. Buyers can use the RGB controller that comes in the box or connect them to ASRock, Asus, Gigabyte, or MSI motherboards for more software lightshow control. Those planning to plunk an MA620P into a boring OEM machine or other system without four-pin LED connectors will be able to select from six different effects.

The MA620P fits astride pretty much any AMD or Intel mainstream desktop sockets going all the way back to Intel's LGA 775 and AMD's AM2. Owners of high-end LGA 20xx and TR4 CPUs won't be able to use the MA620P, though. TechPowerUp says that a second model dubbed MA621P TR4 will be available for Threadripper, but we couldn't dredge up more information about it at press time.

Cooler Master didn't offer pricing or availability information about the MasterAir MA620P, but Dominic Moass at KitGuru said in his review that the cooler will cost £75 when it goes on sale in the UK. After subtracting 20% for VAT and converting to USD, that price comes to about $80. The manufacturer backs the unit with a two-year warranty.

Comments closed
    • Srsly_Bro
    • 2 years ago

    Those planning to plunk an MA620P into a boring OEM machine or other system without four-pin LED connectors will be able to select from six different effects.

    7 if you include off???

      • BurntMyBacon
      • 2 years ago

      [quote=”Srsly_Bro”<]7 if you include off???[/quote<] I hope so. It's really the only mode I need in a boring OEM machine. You know, the kind with solid panels that don't have a window for you to see your shiny LED laden heatsink.

    • Firestarter
    • 2 years ago

    I want this, but then I want to be able to mount it to the case to take the weight off of the motherboard

    kind of like an AIO watercooler actually

    • DavidC1
    • 2 years ago

    This seems crazy. I have BeQuiet! Pure Rock Slim cooler and that looks large already. This is almost twice the size and nearly 2.5x in weight. I’d worry about long term stress on the board.

    There are 11-inch ultrabooks that weigh the same as this HSF combo.

      • hansmuff
      • 2 years ago

      Hah, can you imagine MOVING THE PC? Like, when you pick up the case and set it down somewhere else and you aren’t super careful, the stress on the board, even with a backplate, ought to be pretty crazy.

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      You’ll have kittens when you look at the weight of the [url=http://thermalright.com/product/true-copper/<]Thermalright True Copper[/url<]! Honestly, from decades of experience and several thousand builds, it's not the absolute weight of the heatsink that matters - it's the overly-tight clamping force exerted by bad mounting designs of some heatsinks. I've seen boards killed by 92mm, 500g heatsinks that were installed by careless gorillas with no concept of 'too tight' when using a screwdriver - all because the mounting mechanism put too much strain on the socket area 🙁

    • Shobai
    • 2 years ago

    Just to confirm, you’re saying that that weight is inclusive of the two fans?

    One of the reasons I started watercooling was to get some / most of that weight off the motherboard mounts and strapped securely to the case.

    • RickyTick
    • 2 years ago

    So one fan is blowing warm air into another fan?

      • kmm
      • 2 years ago

      Sure. This dual-stack, dual-fan tower design has been used by many models over the years. Nothing new here.

      I mean, it’s better than one fan blowing through a single stack as wide as the two combined, though that’s at the extra expense, space, and noise of the second fan and needing to have the stacks split.

      Two fans in series effectively increases static pressure (so higher airflow with the given restriction) and here with the staggered layout means more air maybe going through the actual fins and around the heatpipes rather than out of the side of the stacks.

      I see Cooler Master is still a fan of the weird shrouds/plates on top and then more importantly heatpipe direct-touch on the bottom (though maybe with the tight spacing and hopefully with better manufacturing tolerances this is not an issue as it was in the past).

      • Shobai
      • 2 years ago

      As in every single dual fan heatsink that comes readily to mind.

    • Usacomp2k3
    • 2 years ago

    I would guess the Threadripper would have a wider baseplate. That one looks pretty small.

      • morphine
      • 2 years ago

      From the fine article:
      [quote<]Owners of high-end LGA 20xx and TR4 CPUs won't be able to use the MA620P, though- TechPowerUp says that a second model dubbed MA621P TR4 will be available for Threadripper [...][/quote<]

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