Fujitsu Lifebook U938 is featherweight and ready to go

Intel's eighth-generation Core i5 and i7 mobile CPUs have demonstrated their ability to effectively cram four cores and eight hardware threads into a 15 W TDP. Fujitsu's Lifebook U938 laptops cram that power into a package weighing in at just 2 lbs (0.92 kg), a bit lighter than than LG's similarly-specced 13.3" Gram.

Image courtesy of TechPowerUp

Buyers can pick Lifebooks with Intel's Core i5-8250U, i5-8350U, or i7-8650U processors. The motherboard has 4 GB of DDR4 memory soldered in and a single SODIMM slot that can handle up to a 16 GB module, for a total maximum RAM capacity of 20 GB. The onboard M.2 socket accepts storage options including SATA drives up to 1 TB and NVMe devices as large as 512 GB. Fujitsu offers two different 13.3" 1920×1080 IPS monitors for the Lifebook—a model with touchscreen input and maximum brightness of 300 cd/m², or an anti-glare display that can shine at up to 330 cd/m².

Image courtesy of TechPowerUp

Fujitsu managed to cram a decidely "cowardly" amount of connectivity into the Lifebook's sides. The machine has two USB 3.0 Type-A ports, one USB 3.0 Type-C port with Power Delivery functionality, an HDMI connector, and a Gigabit Ethernet port. Additional touches include a card reader, an audio combo jack, and a dedicated power input. Some models also have a SIM card slot for 4G mobile broadband.

Image courtesy of TechPowerUp

The machine measures 12.2" wide, 8.4" deep, and 0.6" thick (31 cm x 21 cm x 1.6 cm). Fujitsu says the lightweight laptop still carries around enough battery for up to 11 hours of use away from a wall outlet.

The company didn't provide pricing information for its Lifebook U938, but TechPowerUp reports that the slim-and-light laptops will start shipping in North America later this month. The company's current-generation Lifebook U937 laptops with seventh-generation Intel Core chips start around $1,370, so we wouldn't expect pricing for the new models to stray much from that amount.

Comments closed
    • ET3D
    • 2 years ago

    I like the idea of soldiered RAM plus SODIMM. Even if this means single channel, it’s still a cool way to offer a base configuration that’s upgradable. Most laptops in this form factor come with only soldiered RAM, so it’s a big step up.

      • Anton Kochubey
      • 2 years ago

      I just wish it was 8GB soldered (would allow 16GB dual-channel), base configuration of 4 GB is unacceptable on a $1400+ machine.

    • End User
    • 2 years ago

    Where the frack is the VGA port? This is not a serious laptop.

      • Laykun
      • 2 years ago

      [url<]https://www.amazon.com/Cable-Matters-HDMI-Adapter-Black/dp/B00879DM56[/url<] Here you go, now it's serious again 😉

      • TheRazorsEdge
      • 2 years ago

      The laptop is barely thick enough to include an ethernet jack. VGA probably doesn’t fit.

      There’s little point anymore. Even cheap projectors have DVI, HDMI, and/or DisplayPort these days. I’d say VGA output is about as useful as PS/2 or floppy disks to most people.

        • End User
        • 2 years ago

        I’m merely taking the piss out of the VGA is still used in businesses crowd.

    • oldog
    • 2 years ago

    I have a Fujitsu scanner on my desk that I use daily. It has been a true workhorse over the last seven years or so. Fujitsu tech support is in the US and they are friendly and knowledgeable.

    I can’t speak to their laptops but my experience in general with Fujitsu has been superb.

      • UberGerbil
      • 2 years ago

      It’s too dated to be any guidance but maybe 15 years ago I had a Fujitsu laptop. My only real complaint was the keyboard, and that was mostly aesthetic: it was white, while the rest of the machine was black/silver. Which looked awesome and different when new, but after several months of use the keys started to look really grungy and yellowish from skin oil and whatnot. There’s a reason why virtually nobody does white keyboards on laptops anymore, not even Apple.

    • mikewinddale
    • 2 years ago

    “The onboard M.2 socket accepts storage options including SATA drives up to 1 TB and NVMe devices as large as 512 GB.”

    Huh? What happens if you install SATA >1 TB or NVMe >512 GB? The physical size of the storage device should be the same. So is there some sort of artificial firmware limitation that causes the laptop to refuse to address more storage space?

    Or does the article mean that Fujitsu **offers* up to 1 TB SATA or 512 GB NVMe? The word “accepts” implies some sort of hardware limitation, whereas “offers” would simply refer to what Fujitsu will sell you.

      • Pancake
      • 2 years ago

      Could be a form factor limitation of devices available today.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 2 years ago

        You can get 1TB NVMe drives from both Intel and Samsung that are just plain ol’ 2280 cards.

          • nico1982
          • 2 years ago

          I suppose Pancake is referring to 2242 or 2260.
          Another option is that back when the design was finalized and validated – last year – only those capacities were available. Basically, the same reason SD card compatibility on smartphone is usually on the low side.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 2 years ago

            It could be either, but my guess is that your second suggestion is the reason.

            • B166ER
            • 2 years ago

            Which is annoyingly confusing. So even if they were the max capacity last year (they weren’t), why not program for higher capacities? NVME have been at 1-2 TB for at least2-3 years now, and higher capacities are coming, there’s no true limit to how much we can store. If anything, just a controller limit or even form factor, but these should be of no consequence for the mobo maker. Make that sucker accept 200 TB, even though it would never happen, why put constraints on the issue?

            • Voldenuit
            • 2 years ago

            For all we know, the Lifebook will work fine with 1 TB NVMe drives, and Fujitsu only mentions up to 512 GB because that’s all they personally tested and certified the device to at the time.

          • Anton Kochubey
          • 2 years ago

          And even 2 TB ones (960 Pro)

    • Pancake
    • 2 years ago

    Looks gorgeous in red!

    At this point I’m starting to feel sorry for the engineers at AMD who must be feeling a bit down watching as dozens of Intel-based expensive ultrabooks keep rolling by while nobody’s using Ryzen.

      • Voldenuit
      • 2 years ago

      Intel has a turnkey operation where they can sell CPU, wifi, southbridge, thunderbolt, WLAN to ultra mobile makers, and they are a known and generally reliable variable that OEMs have experience working with and tweaking/adapting their designs.

      At the ultrabook end, 5-15W U processors are typically constrained on TDP/cooling can can only turbo boost for short periods before throttling their CPU or GPU. This accentuates intel’s lead in single threaded IPC and bursty performance, and limits AMD’s advantage in throughput and GPU, because any task that relies on sustained performance (rendering, gaming) is going to be slow whether you use an intel or AMD chip anyway.

      My opinion is that Ryzen mobile is much better suited to mainstream products, but these tend to be the less sexy models compared to ultralights or gaming laptops, and are usually commodity hardware with low profit margins. And when sub-800 mainstream laptops can be found with 1050Tis these days that are much faster than Ryzen APUs, AMD has a tough fight ahead of it for OEM design wins.

        • Pancake
        • 2 years ago

        Agree on all points. Would add Intel battery life advantage too. They uses cases I care about are bursty with CPU idling 95% of the time (it has very little to do when I’m typing some code, editing a report, reading some tech doc in a web browser or even doing some GIS analysis) and Intel seem to have finessed that sort of workload so even though it may have the same “15W TDP” the battery just lasts longer.

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