Lenovo Mirage Solo standalone Daydream headset shows up for pre-order

Google showed off its Daydream standalone VR platform back in May of last year. At the time, HTC and Lenovo both said they would bring Daydream headsets to market before the end of 2017. HTC eventually gave up on Google's platform in favor of its own for the Vive Focus standalone unit, and Lenovo has been pretty quiet on the matter until today. A product page for the PC maker's Mirage Solo headset has now appeared at B&H.

Lenovo gave an update on the headset's specs back during CES and revealed some key specifications. Assuming the specs haven't changed since then, the Mirage Solo uses a Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 SoC and has 4 GB of memory, putting it roughly on par with a modern flagship smartphone for CPU and graphics grunt. It has 64 GB of integrated storage and a microSD card for adding more space. The headset has a single 5.5" LCD display with a resolution of 2560×1440 coupled with a pair of Fresnel lenses between it and the user's eyeballs. The screen has a maximum refresh rate of 75 Hz and provides a 110° field of view.

The hardware specs and display aren't exactly market-leading. However, the integration of Google's WorldSense inside-out motion tracking could help the Mirage Solo offer convenience not available on higher-end headsets like the HTC Vive and Oculus Rift. WorldSense uses a combination of cameras and sensors to track motion without the need for lighthouse hardware and the associated setup headaches.

Lenovo said it's balanced the weight of the Mirage Solo as part of an effort to enhance comfort. The headset's 1.2-lb (645 g) weight includes a 4000-mAh battery that the company says should be enough for seven hours of use.

B&H lists the Lenovo Mirage Solo for preorder at $400 with an estimated ship date of May 11. The headset comes with a wireless Daydream motion controller.

Comments closed
    • Laykun
    • 2 years ago

    Not too long ago I decided to try out my note 8 with a day dream headset to see if was worth it over the gear vr. My first reaction was “wait, where’s the software?”. Beyond YouTube there’s nothing of any real note to use on Day Dream from last I saw. This is why things like gear vr or Oculus’ standalone headset are more likely to succeed, they have a reasonable library of software, stuff to actually use your headset for. They recently significantly upped the value of the gear vr by adding an app called PhoneCast which allows you to use any 2D android app inside the headset on a cinema sized screen, I recently used this to play some YouTube Red videos and play GTA San Andreas on an extremely long plane flight and loved it.

    A lack of things to do is going to be the thing that kills this headset.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    I’m undecided on Fresnel lenses.

    Yes, they help with weight reduction and screen-door effect.
    No, they cause god-rays and weird distortion on contrasting edges.

    I feel that a better display would be the way to tackle SDE and that the lenses are the one item in a VR headset where quality matters over weight; There are plenty of other materials that can be targeted for weight reduction before you have to futz with the lenses.

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 2 years ago

    I won’t touch Lenovo over they were caught using so superphish twice.

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      How is Lenovo any different to many of the other budget vendors in terms of bundling your new hardware with a plethora of undesirable adware?

      Sure, someone at Lenovo responsible for the undesirable adware screwed up and allowed a third-party add-on which indirectly introduced a vulnerability but it wasn’t as if Lenovo themselves directly installed Superfish; They pre-installed a software bundle just like everyone else that happened to contain a dubious certificate. The wikipedia page on Superfish states that there are over 100 other corporations still using Superfish, whether knowingly or unknowingly. At least Lenovo admitted their mistake and removed it, which is better than others.

      Anyway, if your device comes littered with adware/trialware out of the box, you only have yourself to blame for not wiping it first.

    • sweatshopking
    • 2 years ago

    Until something significantly changes with vr it’ll likely remain small and niche. Strikes me more and more as a 3d tv situation.

      • DavidC1
      • 2 years ago

      The immersiveness brought on by VR isn’t really needed. Traditional display setups are good enough.

      Price of the headsets need to be cut by 1/3rd to $150, Pentium CPUs should be the minimum, cord clutter has to be unified into a single one that can handle all display and power, and games have to focus on more than visual and immersiveness aspect and into gameplay. It seems like a small jump, but its not.

    • DavidC1
    • 2 years ago

    I thought the Oculus standalone headset is going to cost $200? You see, that makes sense.

    However, $400 for a standalone headset when you can get used on Craigslist for $300 with Oculus Rift and $450 for HTC Vive? With the Rift and Vive you get the quality.

    I get that you don’t need a high end computer, but it seems too much over a $30 cardboard-certified headset which depending on the device you get has some nice features.

    Like I said, at $200 its ok. Apparently the Mirage isn’t the most expensive. Some are supposed to be going for $600. Yikes!

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      A good quality “cardboard-certified” headset with it’s pointer based controls and one-button operation does a good job for 90% of the apps on the Play store. Pair it with a bluetooth gamepad and you’re up to 99% of the apps on the Play store. That’s under $100.

      1440p screens are common on phones these days, and even a 1080p screen is good for VR as long as it’s not pentile. Something as old as a Nexus5 gives a great VR experience with Cardboard – certainly better than my DK2 in terms of screen door effect.

      So yes, standalones need to be significantly cheaper than the PSVR or Rift. The PC headsets work exceptionally well on modest hardware thanks to ASW that interpolates a 45fps result and the highest in-game details are rarely required for VR anyway because the perceived resolution is so low*

      *- [i<]you may be looking at 1080p per eye but the FOV is so wide that the area you'd normally perceive as your desktop/laptop screen occupies just a small 480p part of the rendered image.[/i<]

        • DavidC1
        • 2 years ago

        I can see $200 headset making sense.

        With cardboard headsets you have to diligently clean your phone screen before use. You have to make sure the phone is at the center. Some phones have weird borders that doesn’t fit perfectly with the headset. None of those problems exist for standalone ones.

        So at $200, its not cheap, but you basically get a “Quality” cardboard headset. You don’t have to get a good phone to get that experience either. Some of us don’t see getting the latest and greatest Smartphone as being so important. I don’t see Samsung Gear VR as a $100 headset. Rather, I see a $600+$100 cardboard-quality headset.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    How many of these standalone headsets are even remotely successful?

    That’s right, everyone has a Vive, because it has an ecosystem of actual developers making actual content behind it. The Vive is outselling the Oculus more than 2-to-1 and the second place is PSVR because, [i<]oh look[/i<], it has an ecosystem of non-awful content behind it. Every month, yet another "me too" headset springs up, to be a complete flop and forgotten about almost immediately.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 2 years ago

      Daydream seems to (for now at least) have Google’s support. At least there’s [url=https://vr.google.com/daydream/experiences/<]some support[/url<] from developers, even if it's not Doom VFR or whatever. edit: dat price, tho

      • meerkt
      • 2 years ago

      The 2-to-1 split is old data, I think?

      [url<]https://www.roadtovr.com/oculus-rift-takes-lead-htc-vive-steam-majority-market-share/[/url<] [url<]https://www.digitaltrends.com/virtual-reality/playstationvr-outsells-htc-vive-oculus-rift/[/url<]

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        You and Gravatron are both right, my apologies.

        It would seem that VR headset success is still primarily platform-dependent (ie, it has to have a large, AAA ecosystem) but after that, cost is the most important factor with the most popular headsets being:

        #1 PSVR at $219
        #2 Oculus at $399
        #3 Vive at $599

          • meerkt
          • 2 years ago

          I don’t know how the standalones fare, but the real ones are slowly, and maybe surely, getting more popular. It’s still very much a developing market, but it seems standardization is improving?

      • Gravatron
      • 2 years ago

      My numbers may be old, but wasn’t PSVR the market leader by quite a bit? Granted last sales number I could find was around December.

      Granted, it’s the only game in console land, and the others fight for PC dominance.

      • Voldenuit
      • 2 years ago

      [quote<]Every month, yet another "me too" headset springs up, to be a complete flop and forgotten about almost immediately.[/quote<] I vote Nintendo should name their VR Virtual Boy successor 'Mii 2'.

        • BiffStroganoffsky
        • 2 years ago

        ‘Mii 2’ is redundant.

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