ASRock J5005-ITX fanless board packs Pentium Silver power

We've seen a number of boards based on Intel's latest Goldmont SoCs, but the models we looked at all used the silicon maker's two-core, two-thread Celeron J4005 chip rather than the faster Pentium Silver J5005 processor. That changes with ASRock's J5005-ITX, a board that packs the four cores, four threads, and substantially-faster UHD Graphics 605 of the Pentium Silver J5005 chip into a fanless Mini-ITX form factor.

The headlining Pentium Silver has a base clock of 1.5 GHz and boosts up to a more stimulating 2.8 GHz when power and thermal conditions allow. The 18 execution units clocked at up to 800 MHz within the chip's UHD Graphics 605 IGP should give the J5005 considerably more graphics horsepower to work with than the 12 EUs with a maximum clock of 700 MHz in the Celeron J4005. The processor's dual-channel memory controller can communicate with up to 8 GB of 2400 MT/s DDR4 mounted in the pair of SODIMM slots atop the board. A PCIe 2.0 x1 slot is provided for system expansion, along with an E-keyed M.2 slot for a Wi-Fi card. 

Builders will have to connect drives using the board's four SATA ports since the M.2 slot doesn't support storage devices. Two of the SATA connectors are driven by an ASMedia ASM1061 controller that plays along with the Goldmont chip's two native SATA ports.

ASRock sprung for the accessory hardware needed to unleash the full 60-Hz output capability of the IGP at its maximum resolution of 4096×2160. The IGP can drive three displays simultaneously by using its HDMI 2.0, DVI-D, and VGA outputs—though the second and third displays won't reach 4K resolutions. The Realtek ALC892-based audio setup includes an optical output.

As for non-display I/O, the J5005-ITX has a mix of old and new ports. On the retro side, the board sports a pair of PS/2 connectors and two USB 2.0 ports. That old stuff complements a Gigabit Ethernet jack and a pair of USB 3.0 Type-A ports. Builders will need to use a power supply with a standard 24-pin ATX connector as the board doesn't have a barrel jack for power input.

ASRock didn't provide any pricing or availability information for the J5005-ITX motherboard, but TechPowerUp predicts an asking price in the $200-250 range, given the $160 list price of the SoC itself. That price structure would seemingly put the board at a performance disadvantage when compared to a comparably-priced combination of a $99 AMD Ryzen 3 2200G APU and a coordinating socketed motherboard. The J5005-ITX will likely find buyers among those that appreciate its 10-W TDP and ability to run silently thanks to the lack of a fan. ASRock lists OS support as Windows 10 64-bit only, so Linux lovers might want to look elsewhere.

Comments closed
    • ignafiltro
    • 2 years ago

    Im wondering if I could cut open that PCIe slot and fit a Fanless GT-1030 in there. No idea why its not an open one.

      • bobdvb
      • 1 year ago

      Or just use a 4x riser and avoid the cutting on a new mobo? Granted that depends on the case being used…

    • elites2012
    • 2 years ago

    nice but i rather have the amd athlon 5350 or 5370. was and still is a 25 watt chip. does better streaming and multitasking than the intel 6W chip.

      • deruberhanyok
      • 2 years ago

      Heh. I liked the AM1 platform too but it was dead before it launched.

      Kabini was competitive four years ago when those chips were released. If AMD hadn’t immediately abandoned it they’d have probably gotten some revised parts out that were worthwhile. Too bad they didn’t, I thought it was a nice budget platform.

      Anyways, the previous generation Intel part, the Pentium J4205, outperforms an Athlon 5350:

      [url<]https://hardforum.com/threads/the-new-atom-core-is-surprisingly-capable.1917511/[/url<] So these new parts will just widen the gap. Not sure why you'd think an older chip would be better for streaming, either. Those chips had a Gen2 GCN-based GPU - pretty capable for video playback, but the hardware accelerated playback of the previous gen Intel parts was pretty good, too. These new ones also have hardware encoding for formats which the VCE2 in Kabini doesn't support.

    • Eversor
    • 2 years ago

    Even if the quad model is at $99, these are similarly priced at ITX board + Celeron G39xx combos and slower (CPU and GPU). If you can go uATX, it is much further ahead in the price/performance ratio.

    Power wise, Celeron Gs are also far below the TDP they’re rated, putting it much closer to these CPUs (and will never throttle given the higher power limits).

    For comparison, running both CPU and GPU stress tests:

    – i5-3470S (65W) runs at 35W.
    – Celeron G1840 2.8GHz (Haswell) runs at 22-25W.

    The current Celerons are clocked similarly to the Haswell part but leak much less current and won’t ever power throttle.
    That makes these processors pointless except when used in fanless laptops or as a way to fill Intel’s pockets through smaller dies. I wish they would actually price these reasonably.

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]ASRock didn't provide any pricing or availability information for the J5005-ITX motherboard, but TechPowerUp predicts an asking price in the $200-250 range, given the $160 list price of the SoC itself. [/quote<] Ah yes, TechPowerUp committed the same amateur error I've seen over & over on here: Assuming that OEMs pay whatever list price happens to be thrown into the ARK entry for an embedded product.

      • Eversor
      • 2 years ago

      Yeah, all Apollo Lake laptop chips are priced at $161 rather than being dual or quad core. I think desktop parts are in the same situation.

      • ludi
      • 2 years ago

      They don’t, of course, but it’s a new product so initial prices could eb higher than what they will be later in the life cycle.

    • deruberhanyok
    • 2 years ago

    ASRock’s previous generation media-centered Intel SoC boards, the J4205-ITX and J3455-ITX, sold for about $100 and $70 respectively. They were solid boards that were great for streaming, HTPC sort of use. Passively cooled to boot meant with a small SSD and Pico PSU type of DC-DC power adapter you really had a no-noise, no-moving-parts system.

    These will have better CPU performance, better GPU performance, and they add a bunch of hardware video encoding support, so they might make for a pretty solid little media server too (if you’re running software that can use the hardware capabilities). Only downside is 4 SATA ports and not much for expanding that. You could throw some pretty big drives at it to offset that, though.

    Anyways, I’d expect the J5005 and J4105 from this generation to actually come in at similar price points to the models they are replacing – I don’t think anyone would even consider paying $250 for one of these and ASRock knows it.

      • Eversor
      • 2 years ago

      Preliminary benchmarks point to the GPU being almost exactly the same performance – as should the specs. CPU performance goes up considerably.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    For anyone wondering, this this is competitive with a overclocked Core2Quad but is fanless and probably costs less than the heatsink that your Core2Quad needed.

    • DavidC1
    • 2 years ago

    “TechPowerUp predicts an asking price in the $200-250 range, given the $160 list price of the SoC itself.”

    Do none of the authors do any research when writing these articles? I do simple search of my own when I comment on forums. Why would someone that gets paid to write these articles not do fact checking of their own?

    The Apollo Lake platform based J4205, goes for $161 Recommended Customer Price on Ark. Asrock’s J4205-ITX board officially sold for $99. How could the board be cheaper than the chip you say? There’s more than that meets the eye.

    Who cares about facts as a press though eh?

      • Peter.Parker
      • 2 years ago

      Sometimes, you should be able to use some alternative facts.

      • ludi
      • 2 years ago

      The J4205 launched in Q3’16. This product is luanching now with an iGPU update, twice the cache, updated security features, and additional types of DDR4 support. Out-the-gate prices for this might be just a bit higher than a product that’s more than a year old, doncha think?

    • srg86
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]ASRock lists OS support as Windows 10 64-bit only, so Linux lovers might want to look elsewhere.[/quote<] ..err that's pretty normal from my experience (as a Linux user).

      • LauRoman
      • 2 years ago

      Though, i have yet to find an Asrock motherboard i had issues with Linux. Maybe something in the 775/AM2 era (and they were not intel pch) but i would tweak the boot disk and it would work.

        • Bonusbartus
        • 2 years ago

        Why would linux support be dependent on the motherboard?
        It should only be dependent on the chip(sets) used on it right?

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