Nimbus Data’s ExaDrive DC100 SSD is as roomy as they come

When SSDs started to show up in PC build guides for enthusiasts, the first question on my mind was "why are they 2.5" drives?" As it turns out, SSDs are complex devices and making them physically bigger isn't necessarily going to increase their capacity. There are some exceptions, though, like Nimbus Data's new ExaDrive DC100. The name is informative enough—this drive is a datacenter-focused SSD that holds one hundred terabytes.

If the name Nimbus Data isn't familiar to you, you're probably not in the target market for this product. The company has been peddling its flash-based products for the better part of a decade and made waves during last summer by delivering a 50-TB SSD. Now Nimbus has upped the ante and doubled the capacity of its top-tier offering. The ExaDrive DC100 is a SATA SSD in the 3.5" form factor usually reserved for hard drives.

Nimbus Data claims the DC100 is not only the world's highest-capacity SSD, but also the world's most energy-efficient solid-state drive. The stated 0.1 W/TB number (which we presume is active power consumption) is certainly impressive. Extremely-high-capacity drives like these sometimes have poor performance, but Nimbus says the ExaDrive DC100 can hit 500 MB/s in sequental transfers going either way. More remarkably, Nimbus says the DC100 can reach 100,000 IOPS in both random read and write workloads. That kind of read performance would be impressive for any SATA SSD, but the write performance is especially outstanding.

Enterprise SSDs are often rated for up to 5 drive writes per day (DWPD). Likely owing to the enormous capacity of the DC100, Nimbus Data guarantees the drive for "unlimited" writes over its five year warranty. Because of the SATA interface, you'll peak at around 0.5 DWPD in any case, so the "unlimited" write warranty isn't as crazy as it seems. The big question mark on these drives is their price tag. Nimbus has a whole page of total-cost-of-ownership comparisons, but there are no actual dollar figures. In the market these drives are targeting, though, the no-doubt-precious up-front price will be of little concern.

Comments closed
    • avengerd@gmail.com
    • 2 years ago

    I would fill this with the digits of pi.

    • AMD64Blondie
    • 2 years ago

    Kinda scary to see a single SSD that has nearly 6 times the total advertised space as my entire collection of hard drives (and my boot 1 TB SSD).

    I’ve got a total advertised size amount around 16.75 TB between all my drives.
    (as reported by AIDA64.)

      • DPete27
      • 2 years ago

      Single point of failure!!!!!

    • Blytz
    • 2 years ago

    I hope this puts some pressure on the spinning rust divisions to drive their pricing down (or release large capacities with a little more haste)

    Not that I am buying 100tb a pop, but one can hope it’ll drive overall prices down a touch quicker than the market had intended prior to it’s release.

    • CuriouslySane
    • 2 years ago

    The ExaDrive branding is going to be unfortunate when they inevitably release the PetaDrive and have to explain that no, really it’s the bigger one.

    • Pancake
    • 2 years ago

    I feel the need to giggle insanely. How much is it?

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      More than double the cost/TB of already expensive Enterprise SSDs. The point is that you get massively reduced running costs and can put 8 racks of storage into a single rack.

      When and extra seven racks of hardware can cost half a million in capital and more than 100K in overheads, then it starts to make sense.

    • Waco
    • 2 years ago

    100 TB drive…not dual port 12G SAS.

    Confused.

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      You shouldn’t be. Many high-end bulk storage solutions use SATA interfaces. The 530MB/s bandwidth and 32 queue depth is more than adequate when 16-64 SATA drives are combined by a single controller in an enclosure.

      Two of our three SAN vendors use SATA, and the one that doesn’t is older, slower, and was more expensive.

        • Scrotos
        • 2 years ago

        Yes, but isn’t the dual port to give multi path redundancy in just this type of expensive scenario? And doesn’t supporting the SAS protocol over/instead of SATA allow for non-blocking operations when writing to an array of these?

        That’s what always confused me with “data center” SSD. Not that I felt the speed was being limited but that the features/protocol was.

          • Waco
          • 2 years ago

          This. Can’t do HA easily and SAS is a lot more efficient than tunneled SATA.

          Just seems like an odd choice.

      • Shinare
      • 2 years ago

      Agreed. This is short sighted and disappointing.

    • Redocbew
    • 2 years ago

    We’re going to make an SSD that will store one hundred TRILLION bytes.

    /pinky

    • DeMurGaTRoiD
    • 2 years ago

    this is going straight into my softmodded PS2

      • Scrotos
      • 2 years ago

      That takes IDE… ugh using a converter to go to SATA on top of using it for a PS2 game library. What’s next, shoehorning it into a Dreamcast?!?

    • Wirko
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]If the name Nimbus Data isn't familiar to you, you're probably not in the target market for this product.[/quote<] That can be said of many products, up to and including Parmigiano Reggiano cheese.

    • mcnabney
    • 2 years ago

    It will take at least two days to fill this drive. Trying to figure out purpose of the drive.

      • JosiahBradley
      • 2 years ago

      To store 100TB of data…. I could use a few of these to replace disk arrays.

        • DavidC1
        • 2 years ago

        Assuming you are willing to sell your compact sedan for it. It’s going to go for $20K to $40K dollars. Maybe you’ll have to sell your Tesla.

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 2 years ago

        I’m wondering if I would actually choose to replace a disk array with one though, the performance is OK perhaps, but redundancy seems like a major weak point. You’d need to put these into a RAID, and it had better be a good server. Or maybe a cluster of small servers, each with one drive.

      • Neutronbeam
      • 2 years ago

      For your er, classical music collection – – yeah, that’s it.

        • Wilko
        • 2 years ago

        I wouldn’t be able to store much else on my computer if my entire (classical) music collection was in FLAC.

    • Anovoca
    • 2 years ago

    Better chance at getting one of these dropped off by an owl at breakfast than affording one for my home Plex server.

      • oldog
      • 2 years ago

      IMHO – Weird Al references >> Harry Potter references!

    • bthylafh
    • 2 years ago

    I’ll be in my bunk.

      • willmore
      • 2 years ago

      Keep your hands off of Vera.

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