Adata’s XPG SX8200 takes the company’s SSD speed crown

You could be forgiven for thinking that the Adata XPG SX8200 is a minor upgrade or revision of the prior XPG SX8000, and that it sits behind the XPG SX9000 in performance. You would be mistaken, though. The SX8200, which we first saw at CES this year, uses what Adata calls "second-generation 64-layer 3D NAND flash" in combination with an NVMe-1.3-ready controller from SMI to produce the company's fastest SSD to date.

In case you can't tell from the picture, the XPG SX8200 is an M.2-2280 SSD. It comes in 240 GB, 480 GB, and 960 GB capacities, and connects to the now-standard PCIe 3.0 x4 connection in M-key M.2 sockets. Adata marks down the SX8200 for up to 3200 MB/s on sequential reads and 1700 MB/s on sequential writes. Random I/O performance is pretty darn good too: up to 310K IOPS on reads and 280K IOPS on writes.

Besides bringing a performance upgrade, the XPG SX8200 is Adata's first NVMe 1.3-capable SSD. You can read more about the NVMe 1.3 spec here, but the super-short version is that it brings both performance- and reliability-improving features over from eMMC and AHCI to the NVMe spec. The SX8200 also comes with a fancy heatsink with pre-applied thermal compound in the box, but not installed. That way, whether you prefer to leave your drives bare or cover them up, you're ready to go in either case.

XPG SX8200 with included heatsink

Adata puts down the 240 GB drive for 160 TBW, the 480 GB drive for 320 TBW, and the 960GB drive for 640 TBW. SX8200 buyers will enjoy a five-year warranty. The new drives should show up at e-tail any moment now, although we couldn't find them yet. Adata expects the 240-GB drive to go for $140, the 480-GB model for $260, and the largest 960-GB unit for $480.

Comments closed
    • K-L-Waster
    • 2 years ago

    At the end of the first paragraph it says “MVMe-1.3-ready controller” — should that not be “NVMe-1.3-ready controller”?

      • Growler
      • 2 years ago

      MVMe stands for [b<]M[/b<]ost [b<]V[/b<]aluable [b<]Me[/b<]mory. These SSDs get the title because they're so fast.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]Adata marks down the SX8200 for up to 3200 MB/s on sequential reads and 1700 MB/s on sequential writes. Random I/O performance is pretty darn good too: up to 310K IOPS on reads and 280K IOPS on writes.[/quote<] Sure, sequential reads and writes. Who, [i<]exactly[/i<] is storing multi-gigabyte files on tiny little SSD's intended for OS and applications? Maybe if you're working with a lot of 4K video editing you could use the larger variant of these as a temporary drive for working with raw footage but that's already niche and not the intended market. As for the Random I/O performance, these figures are always completely unrealistic multi-threaded, highly optimised datasets at max queue depth. We all know that if you benchmark these things at QD1 you're going to get 25-50MB/s which translates to an unexciting 6500-13000 IOPS matched by pretty much every SATA drive in the last half decade.....

      • DPete27
      • 2 years ago

      Hey shush. The average Joe doesn’t know anything more than “bigger # = better”

      In all seriousness, (you know more about this than I do, but) drives benefit from NVMe in latency (if nothing else) which makes things a bit snappier, but other than that you’ll see most NVMe SSD reviews end in a “meh”. They’re a bit faster than SATA. You may or may not notice, depending on your usage and sensitivity. But unless the price is close to SATA and you’re building/upgrading anyway, the real life benefits are minimal.

      • albundy
      • 2 years ago

      when the 960 EVO’s cost less and run better 4kqd1 numbers…makes you wonder.

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        I don’t have one yet, but the MX500 is supposed to be the best-in-class 4KQD1 controller these days. AND IT’S A SATA DRIVE LOL.

        Seriously, the number of scenarios where the 530MB/s SATA bus is the bottleneck is surprisingly low.

      • DavidC1
      • 2 years ago

      Actually the Optane SSD 800P reviews are showing at least for current roster of benchmarks, you do need the sequential numbers to get up there. The 800P has simply awesome QD1 numbers. It doesn’t do so well in most review sites.

      I don’t think any NAND SSD drives are going to reach its sequential numbers, because you can’t expect that in reality, but there are cases where its going to take significant advantage of it.

      Storage benchmarks are really hard. If you show so-called real world testing and just do loading times, it would be extremely boring. And when you are transferring files, then those MB/s numbers matter a bit too. So you show that.

    • DPete27
    • 2 years ago

    Odd that the XPG SX8000 comes in 256GB and 512GB flavours. More overprovisioning in the 8200 I guess.
    The SX8000 is on my short list of NVMe budget drives. The 512GB model goes for as little as $165. (if anyone is interested)

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