Thermaltake View 37 case puts PC internals on full display

Fully-transparent case windows give a decent look at the components within a custom-built PC, but that glimpse isn't good enough for the designers at Thermaltake. The company's View 37 Riing Edition and View 37 RGB Edition E-ATX chassis have an acrylic panel that wraps around one side and the top of the case to offer up an unobstructed peek at the goods inside the box.

The View 37 will accept motherboards up to 13" wide (33 cm) and graphics cards up to 16.1" (41 cm) long without the front fan in place. Power supplies up to 8.7" (22 cm) will slide in without issue. Pack rats can stow as many as seven 3.5" drives, a total of eleven 2.5" devices, or some intermediate combination of both. All this storage space means the case is big, measuring 20.6" tall, 10.3" wide, and 21.2" deep (53 cm x 26 cm x 54 cm). The chassis comes with a support bracket for vertical GPU mounting, but builders must supply their own PCIe riser cable.

The View 37 comes with 140-mm fans, but the manufacturer says buyers can stuff 200-mm spinning air movers behind the case's clear front panel. Air coolers as tall as 7.1" (18 cm) will also fit. For those that prefer liquid cooling, the case is ready to swallow a 360-mm or 280-mm radiator behind the front panel or a 360-mm or 420-mm heat exchanger next to the motherboard tray. Either way, builders can also mount a 120-mm radiator to the case's rear panel.

Thermaltake is offering up two different takes on the View 37. The standard Riing Edition has blue LEDs on the pair of included 140-mm-diameter fans. The RGB Edition comes with three of the company's fanciful Riing RGB fans in the same large size along with a standalone RGB controller. Thermaltake says the colorful diodes will also accept instruction from Asus' Aura Sync, Gigabyte's RGB Fusion, or MSI's Mystic Light software packages on compatible motherboards. Thermaltake's controller can be used from outside the case thanks to a PCI-bracket remote control.

The View 37 Riing Edition with blue-lit Riing fans is available from Amazon for $110. The View 37 RGB Edition is listed at Newegg for $170. The company backs the View 37 with a three-year warranty.

Comments closed
    • thanatos355
    • 2 years ago

    *queues “Thunder and Blazes”*

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 2 years ago

    It looks like a rainbow got sick all over the case.

      • Redocbew
      • 2 years ago

      The question is from which end of the rainbow was this produced? It could be either.

        • SHOES
        • 2 years ago

        Likely a “double rainbow” therefore it would have started on both ends at once.

          • Redocbew
          • 2 years ago

          So very unfortunate when that happens.

      • ludi
      • 2 years ago

      Somewhere in all that, there are tiny Mariokart avatars having the time of their life.

    • DPete27
    • 2 years ago

    The non-lit GPU stands out like a sore thumb in that RGB vomit box.

      • geniekid
      • 2 years ago

      Seriously. If you’re going to turn your computer into a miniature casino, at least do it right.

      Also not surprising that the component generating the most heat isn’t part of the water loop.

        • morphine
        • 2 years ago

        You mean the LEDs?

        [i<]badum-tssshhh[/i<]

        • egon
        • 2 years ago

        Hmm, casino… you’ve just hinted at an entire untapped market of audio embellishments to complement the visual.

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 2 years ago

        Bro, this isn’t 20 years ago. If I can get more performance from putting my CPU on a loop and not the GPU, what difference does it matter? High end over clocked CPUs can draw just as much as a high end graphics card. Get out of here with your ideological nonsense. The 90s are gone.

    • Sargent Duck
    • 2 years ago

    Sooo…many…colors…

      • ludi
      • 2 years ago

      [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ejKUJu9xct4[/url<]

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