Asus VG258Q offers FreeSync and blur reduction in a basic package

Using a high-refresh-rate monitor while gaming is a revelation. It's hard to overstate the improvement in quality-of-life for action gamers when going from a standard 60-Hz display to a 144-Hz monitor with variable-refresh-rate or blur-reduction technologies. For that reason, while we love our high-spec gaming monitors like the ROG Swift PG35VQ, we're also glad to see the introduction of entry-level monitors like the 24.5" Asus VG258Q.

This monitor is pretty much the baseline for what constitutes a gaming display. The VG258Q has a 1920×1080 resolution, a maximum refresh rate of 144 Hz, and support for AMD's FreeSync adaptive-refresh-rate tech. The monitor uses a TN panel, so the color saturation is nothing to write home about and the viewing angles are typical for that panel type at 170° horizontally and 160° vertically. However, the VG285Q has a peak brightness of 400 cd/m², which should help keep things nice and vivid while using its Enhanced Low Motion Blur strobing mode.

In fact, on paper, this display seems pretty similar to the MG248QE we reported on about two weeks ago. However, there are a few differences. For starters, the size—the VG258Q is about an inch larger diagonally than the MG248QE. The VG258Q also has speakers, where the MG248QE lacks them. Finally, the VG258Q's stand supports swivel adjustments in addition to the tilt and pivot adjustments on the MG248QE's.

Besides that, though, both models are pretty similar. The VG258Q has the same 40-144 Hz variable-refresh-rate range, as well as the same 1-ms response time. Given my personal experiences with Asus 1-ms TN panels and the company's ELMB tech, I'd expect this display to have some pretty clear motion. With its size, FreeSync support, and built-in speakers, the VG258Q could be the perfect companion for an Xbox One S in a kid's room. Asus hasn't announced pricing or availability for the display, but we'd expect it to ring in under $300 given the prices for similar displays.

Comments closed
    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    Just to confimed I’ve not missed anything ground-breaking here, this offers Freesync OR blur-reduction, right?

    VRR with strobing blur-reduction is the holy grail but nobody’s made it work right yet, IIRC.

      • guardianl
      • 2 years ago

      Although VRR and strobing can be combined theoretically, strobing at low hz causes people to see the “flicker effect” as individual “black” (backlight off) frames become apparent. That’s why current ULBM options are normally restricted to a minimum of ~80 hz. Realistically most people would see independent frames (black insertion) at that rate. At 44hz headaches and nausea would probably be common.

      • Firestarter
      • 2 years ago

      AFAIK it can only work if you accept varying brightness due to variable frame rate (I guess it’d be very distracting/headache inducing). The strobe length would obviously be adjusted to keep brightness as constant as possible, but it’s impossible to know how long the strobe for the current frame has to be because the time to arrival of the next frame is unknown. Strobing multiple times instead of a single strobe would defeat the purpose of strobing as it would reintroduce motion tracking blur. Buffering a single frame so that the strobe length can be calculated would introduce input lag, also defeating the purpose of a gaming display.

      I don’t know if there’s another way to approach this problem

      • DPete27
      • 2 years ago

      Can’t say I’ve ever noticed motion blur, even on 5ms IPS panels. I [b<]DO[/b<] notice tearing and runt frames pretty easily. Suffice to say I'll never be using strobing instead of VRR.

        • Voldenuit
        • 2 years ago

        Strobing is like VRR, you don’t notice it until you lose it.

        ULMB/ELMB works really well for silhouette recognition in peripheral vision, and really helps in fast paced shooters.

        My PG278Q had ULMB, but my current AW3418DW doesn’t, and ULMB was a godsend in Overwatch, but I’ve fallen off playing OW of late, so I’m making do without.

    • Misel
    • 2 years ago

    Why 1080 and not 1200? 🙁

      • DPete27
      • 2 years ago

      To piss you off.

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      Because 1200p is a relic from the previous decade?

      Since widescreen TV became a thing, content has been 16:9 and manufacturers have been pushing for wider, not taller.

      If you want more vertical real estate just buy a bigger/higher-resolution screen. 1440p is better than 1920×1200 and thanks to the economies of scale, 1440p panels are cheaper/better/more common than the niche 1920×1200 resolution.

    • Phaleron
    • 2 years ago

    Anyone know if Asus has officially signed the GPP? If so I’ll have to take their monitors off my “buy/recommend list”.

      • Voldenuit
      • 2 years ago

      Meh, if ‘ROG’ becomes an nvidia-only shop, I wouldn’t mind ASUS’ Radeon and Radeon-compatible products becoming less RGB-infested.

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