Acer Chromebook Tab 10 is the first Chrome OS tablet

Laptops running Google's Chrome OS are gaining ground as the company widens access to the Play Store, making them suitable for a growing number of tasks. The browser-based OS is now spreading from its current home on laptops and small-form-factor desktop machines to tablets, and Acer's Chromebook Tab 10 is the first slate running Google's "other" OS.

The Chromebook Tab 10 has a large 9.7" IPS display panel with a resolution of 2048×1536. The screen accepts input through touch or the included Wacom EMR pen. Acer's Chromebook Tab 10 preview page is light on hardware specs, but Jacob Kastrenakes at The Verge says the machine has the same Rockchip OP1 ARM SoC found in some Samsung Chromebooks, along with 4 GB of memory and 32 GB of onboard storage. Users can store additional data on a microSD card. We can see that the Chromebook Tab has front- and rear-facing cameras, but Acer didn't provide any specs for the pair of peepers.

Google's Chrome OS isn't known for its enormous collection of applications, but the Chromebook Tab 10 has support for the Google Play Store. The OS has made inroads in the education sector due to low hardware prices and the ability to streamline management of tens or hundreds of devices through a web-based console. We imagine the management tools were the main reason Chrome OS was chosen over the search giant's more popular Android.

The company says the the Chromebook Tab 10 will last for 10 hours on a single battery charge, though there's no word on the juice pack's capacity. The charge can be replenished using a USB-C cable.

The Verge goes on to say the Chromebook Tab 10 will go on sale in April for $329, the same price as the current bottom-rung iPad. Analysts expect Apple to unveil an iPad for $259 tomorrow, though it could lack the Tab's included stylus. Apple's current stylus pens must be charged independently, while the Tab's Wacom-based unit doesn't have a battery.

Comments closed
    • BiffStroganoffsky
    • 2 years ago

    Does Chromebook disable features for Gmail and drive that are available for the Windows and MacOS like Google does for Android. Being limited to what attachment types you can choose in Android blows. The drive app also can be problematic if hardware vendors do not opt to allow updates. Most often, this seems more a drive to sell new phones and tablets than system limitations.

    • tipoo
    • 2 years ago

    The OP1 is pretty dated, eh?

    [url<]https://browser.geekbench.com/v4/cpu/compare/1925145?baseline=1888954[/url<] I know they had their teh optimization mumbo jumbo and reportedly the chromebook with it was quick enough, but a processor is a processor and web workloads are web workloads, you can’t magic your way out of a processor being relatively slow by now. Why isn’t there an OP2? Why the 1, if there isn’t, there’s so much better out there? At 329 the current budget iPad already seems more appealing, and that's before seeing if it's dropping to 259 tomorrow.

      • hungarianhc
      • 2 years ago

      I think in terms of iPad vs Chrometab, performance aside, there’s a philosophically different approach: Chromebook = best in class browser, sweet Google integration, and hey – look – android apps! iPad = Apple ecosystem, the best apps, and an okay web browser.

      I.E. They both have their own ecosystems…. pick which you like. Beyond that, it’s browser then apps. Or Apps then browser.

      Re: OP1, yeah… I’m ready for an OP2.

        • tipoo
        • 2 years ago

        The software definitely sets them apart, but I just mean, going at the budget iPad price with a ~2600 GB multicore, they really should have done better and I just couldn’t help but feel the speed I’m buying belongs in a sub 200 dollar tablet nowadays.

          • Spunjji
          • 2 years ago

          Its MP score seems to range from low-2000s up to ~3100. At the upper end that gives it comparable performance to the Snapdragon 820 which still outclasses a lot of mid-range SoCs. So I’d say that dated is a relative term, and presumably as a Google-approved chipset it’ll get better software support.

          Maybe.

          Hopefully?

            • Goty
            • 2 years ago

            Honestly, outside of gaming, even relatively ancient ARM SoCs still do very well when not burdened with a bunch of ridiculous skins and bloatware.

            [anecdote]I recently inherited a Galaxy Tab S (mid-2014, Snapdragon 800 era device) and was about ready to just put it up on eBay due to how sluggish it was. I decided to give it another chance and install an AOSP ROM and the difference in performance is just astounding. It’s not going to be playing PUBG Mobile on anything other than low settings (and struggling a bit at that), but it’s perfectly fine for websurfing, email, and multimedia consumption.[/anecdote]

            • Chz
            • 2 years ago

            Looking at the specs, it appears *very* similar to the Mediatek SoC in the Fire 10 HD. 2xA72/4xA53. The A72 is actually a better general-purpose core than the SD820’s “big” cores, but the 820 has four of them.

    • mieses
    • 2 years ago

    What drawing app is shown in the photo?

      • demani
      • 2 years ago

      Yeah-that’s pretty much my killer app, so this or whatever Apple releases tomorrow…

        • mieses
        • 2 years ago

        Do you have any clue what the name of the app is?

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