Microsoft restructures groups as Terry Myerson leaves the company

More big changes could be on the way for Windows soon. According to Mary Jo Foley at ZDNet, Microsoft announced a major reorganization of the company today. Foley says that the Windows and Devices Group is being split up, and that its former leader Terry Myerson is leaving Microsoft. Myerson has been with the company since 1997, although he's only been in charge of Windows since 2013.

Microsoft's Windows and Devices Group (WDG) included not only the teams responsible for the Windows software itself but also the Surface, Xbox, and HoloLens teams. According to Foley, two newer divisions are getting some of the employees from the WDG: a group called Experiences & Devices, and another group called Cloud & AI Platform.

It's difficult to say exactly what the reoganization means for Windows because it's not clear which parts of the WDG went where. Foley writes that the Experiences & Devices group is headed by Rajesh Jha, who's been in charge of Office since 2006. Meanwhile, the Cloud & AI Platform group was created in 2016 and has been led by Scott Guthrie since then.

In a subsequent article, Foley notes that Joe Belfiore will be in charge of the "Windows client experience," apparently including Windows' shell UI, Edge, and Cortana. Foley further says Panos Panay will get a Chief Product Officer title but otherwise remains the head of Microsoft devices. Both these managers report to Jha.

In his e-mail to all MS employees, CEO Satya Nadella said that the changes are meant to help Microsoft focus on "the intelligent cloud and the intelligent edge." He also stated that employees will need to "transcend Conway's Law." Nadella's sentiment is an interesting one in light of the fact that he just reorganized the company's structure. Hopefully the changes lead to a more coherent Windows strategy going forward.

Comments closed
    • ClickClick5
    • 2 years ago

    MS, wanna know how to turn things around? Make a server OS, once again, a server OS.

    Enterprise environments need stability, not rollup updates that mostly introduces 3d Paint and better touchscreen support. Most servers are connected to by RDP, this is what we need. Since 2008 R2, everything has been sliding the way of stupid.

    BAH!

    EDIT: Security patches and stability. This is what is needed.

      • Flying Fox
      • 2 years ago

      LTSB and CBB?

    • Rakhmaninov3
    • 2 years ago

    With MS’s plans to dig into your stuff if anyone complains about what you say, I may become a Mac customer for the first time in my life.

    I’d rather err on the side of refusing to help the FBI than have any of those a-hos reading any of my private stuff.

      • Flying Fox
      • 2 years ago

      For now, at least, Microsoft and Apple appear to be on the same side of the privacy spectrum.
      [url<]http://www.dailyherald.com/business/20180331/commentary-why-apple-and-microsoft-are-healthier-than-facebook[/url<] If anything, Google is similar on that other end of the scale. If you are using any Google stuff then you are applying a double standard.

    • End User
    • 2 years ago

    Hey Microsoft. Stick with x64 and everything will fine.

    • ET3D
    • 2 years ago

    I can’t see how this will result in a more coherent Windows strategy. Neither ‘Experiences & Devices’ nor ‘Cloud & AI Platform’ have that word ‘Windows’ in them, which means it’s taking a back stage. I can’t see how that’s going to do anything for it.

      • odizzido
      • 2 years ago

      Hopefully that’s what they removed from the WDG. Best thing, for customers, would be for the windows group to only work on windows with no internet connection. No one drive subscription nagging, no defaulting to online logins, no downloading candy crush over and over. I can dream right?

        • sweatshopking
        • 2 years ago

        Go install windows 7 if you want an os from 2007.

          • odizzido
          • 2 years ago

          I actually do run W7

            • sweatshopking
            • 2 years ago

            Then you have everything you could want

            • odizzido
            • 2 years ago

            No, because they made it so I need to fight my OS to install updates when I finally get a new processor. They had to make W7 not work correctly to try to force people to use their new advertising platform.

            • sweatshopking
            • 2 years ago

            You want support past the end of support date?

            • odizzido
            • 2 years ago

            If they actually did just stop doing work on W7 that would be fine. My problem is that they put in the effort to block people from doing updates. Now I am eventually going to have to figure out how to trick W7 into working like it used to before they shit on it.

            • Redocbew
            • 2 years ago

            That horse is dead Jim. Very dead.

          • rechicero
          • 2 years ago

          Another way of seeing this is: How can be installing a 10 + years old OS an valid option? Somebody really messed up this past 10 years and, as you say, the point of those compromises that make our lifes harder (why do I need to reconfigure several things, including the remote settings, with every major update????) ended up an epic fail: Windows was dead in mobile and now is buried.

            • sweatshopking
            • 2 years ago

            It isn’t. anyone doing this is silly.

    • odizzido
    • 2 years ago

    I’d say things could only get better but I know better now. I am sure they’re opening the floodgates for the septic tank at this very moment.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]the Windows and Devices Group is being split up[/quote<] Finally. The fact that Server 2012 and 2016 were touchscreen, gesture-controlled, mobile-first products was infuriatingly stupid and dumb for a product that is largely used for SSH and RDP sessions that don't support touchscreen, gesture-controlled, mobile-first interfaces. Microsoft managed to piss upon Enterprise, Developer, Professional and SMB markets with their one-size-fits-all OS approach being dragged towards the mobile consumer hardware vision of their Devices Group. What Sinovsky started, Myerson failed to truly undo, but at least he didn't make it worse.

      • sweatshopking
      • 2 years ago

      Maybe I’m mistaken, but didn’t they merge them so they could make better devices? Surface was a result of that unification.
      I see this more as an acknowledgement that Windows is dying quickly. Android has won. Microsoft has the cloud left, and as the business world transfers away from Windows they need to make sure they still exist.

        • MOSFET
        • 2 years ago

        You are as mistaken as you can be. It’s an acknowledgement that software and hardware should be developed separately. Android won? Won what? The corporate desktop? Wake me up when you and Elon get back from Alpha Centauri.

        Also, I apologize. Rough afternoon. But no edits.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 2 years ago

          I think he’s talking about non-PC “devices” like phones. Not tablets, but phones definitely. Windows is basically done on phones, and I feel like Windows on ARM is a last gasp at very-low-power tablets.

            • sweatshopking
            • 2 years ago

            Yes, basically. As for corporate use that’s just a matter of time. Windows is beyond saving now

            • derFunkenstein
            • 2 years ago

            That’s quite a turn for you. Do you really believe that?

            • sweatshopking
            • 2 years ago

            Yes. I don’t think it is ideal, but it is the way it is going. Microsoft can’t afford to develop a closed source os to compete with free android without monetizing users. corporations will not generally permit that kind of spying on their secure devices, at least at first. As windows use falls eventually Android will take over the other markets, and will be made into more secure versions for enterprise use, which will be subsidized by massive consumer monetization. I don’t see any outcome here where privacy or Windows survives.

            I still think Windows is objectively better. That doesn’t mean it’ll survive.

            • blastdoor
            • 2 years ago

            Windows sucks. It always has. There was a period of maybe 10 years (about 1995-2005) where everything else sucked more, but Windows has always sucked. Microsoft’s success was as much about their competitors shooting themselves in the face as it was about anything that Microsoft got right.

            With Android, Google has just beat Microsoft at its own game — a tasteless, culture-less race to the bottom customer exploitation-fest.

            • sweatshopking
            • 2 years ago

            I’d argue windows is a much better OS today than either MacOS or any Linux build for MOST users.

            • blastdoor
            • 2 years ago

            If your argument is based on the diversity of apps, especially games, then I can see that point.

            • Redocbew
            • 2 years ago

            So long as there’s holdouts like Office and Photoshop I’m not sure how much the OS its self really matters.

            Of course there’s OpenOffice and Gimp, but here I am three years later after using Ubuntu as my primary OS and I still haven’t learned either of them. If a nerd like me hasn’t found the time to do that, then I don’t think you have to worry about everyone else jumping ship any time soon.

            • End User
            • 2 years ago

            Office runs on Windows/macOS/ iOS/Android and Chrome OS (via Android).

            Adobe Creative Suite runs on both Windows and macOS.

            • blastdoor
            • 2 years ago

            Yup, and I’m glad they do. Word, Excel, Powerpoint, OneNote, and OneDrive are all products I use and like reasonably well on iOS and macOS.

            Microsoft has always been pretty good at application development. It’s just Windows that sucks.

            • Redocbew
            • 2 years ago

            MacOS is a special case since it requires specific hardware, and it’s a pain in the neck to do “real work” on a phone or tablet. That’s not because of the OS it’s just the nature of the devices which is kind of the whole point here.

            • End User
            • 2 years ago

            My iPad Pro 12.9” is, in many ways, a better work device than my ThinkPad T480. Office apps work very well on the iPad Pro. Multitasking on the iPad Pro is fantastic so that helps a great deal.

            Using office on a phone can be done by using a full-size Bluetooth keyboard and a stand for the phone. Not an ideal setup but good enough if one is on the road and travelling super light.

            • Redocbew
            • 2 years ago

            Multitasking on a tablet? What does that even mean?

            Traveling super light would argue against carrying an otherwise useless keyboard and stand, no?

            • End User
            • 2 years ago

            [url=https://support.apple.com/en-ca/HT207582<]Three apps at the same time with quick app switching at your finger tips plus a bunch of other useful features[/url<]. It is awesome. There is this [url=https://www.microsoft.com/accessories/en-us/products/keyboards/universal-foldable-keyboard/gu5-00001<]keyboard by Microsoft[/url<] and for a stand I use [url=https://www.studioneat.com/products/glif<]this[/url<] (I just use it on its own to give my iPhone a decent viewing angle).

            • sweatshopking
            • 2 years ago

            Whoa! Three apps at once! And here I was on my helix today with only a dozen open!
            And it’s hilarious to hear you talking about fingers when you complained about gorilla arms on windows PC’s for so so long.

            • Redocbew
            • 2 years ago

            Right… The obvious solution is to spend an extra $130 on widgets you’d rather not need in order to drive your square peg of a tablet into a round hole.

            Different devices have different uses. Is that not the conclusion Microsoft has reached here after years of attempting to convince everyone otherwise?

            • blastdoor
            • 2 years ago

            I would say multitasking on the iPad Pro is a work in progress. It’s pretty annoying that I can’t have more than one Word document (or powerpoint file, etc) open at the same time.

            Don’t get me wrong… I like my iPad Pro, and because it is so light and has great battery life I would generally rather take it with me than a laptop. But there are things that are much harder to do on an iPad — or cannot be done at all — relative to a Mac. And it’s a little frustrating at times because the limitations are not because of the hardware. It’s because Apple is taking their sweet time to accrete features.

            • End User
            • 2 years ago

            What you meant to say was monetizing consumer data.

            • sweatshopking
            • 2 years ago

            consumers NOW. it’s coming to enterprise too.

            • End User
            • 2 years ago

            They have always monetized consumers in the enterprise space (CALs). Monetizing consumer data is something different.

            • sweatshopking
            • 2 years ago

            I’m aware. I’m suggesting that type of data mining is going to be everywhere.

            • End User
            • 2 years ago

            Apart from Apple.

            • sweatshopking
            • 2 years ago

            Sure. I think that’s likely. And I’d say Microsoft too for the most part, while they’re a player in this market.

            • Chrispy_
            • 2 years ago

            You see, I think there’s an alternative outcome over the long time frame you’re envisaging; An outcome that favours Windows OS as it used to be – paid for up front for an experience that offers more privacy and control of their device.

            You see, I think consumers will get sick of being monetized and will start paying a premium to get a more private experience with fewer ads and more data/usage security.

            • sweatshopking
            • 2 years ago

            I think you’re wrong. there are literally billions and billions of people who haven’t entered the technological world yet, and every penny matters to them. The momentum is too strong. Windows could survive as a niche OS (maybe 1 billion people) but there would be less developer interest (look at twitter shutting down it’s macOS client recently) and it requires a ton of engineers.
            That ship has sailed, as I see it. People will just want more secure versions of android for more privacy/security

            • Chrispy_
            • 2 years ago

            Apple’s business model works on the “premium only” market and they aren’t doing too badly.

            • sweatshopking
            • 2 years ago

            Sure, but they’re losing market share annually, and while i’m sure they’ll survive that’s a market Microsoft isn’t likely to push them out of.

            • Chrispy_
            • 2 years ago

            For now, perhaps but I think you’re underestimating how annoyed and worried even your average technophobe is of having their usage and data sold to third parties.

            What do you think GDPR is about? Even governments are starting to wake up to the misuse of personal data.

            • sweatshopking
            • 2 years ago

            I think you over estimate the quality of our political systems as well as the attention spans of your average consumer.

            • Chrispy_
            • 2 years ago

            The world =! USA

            • sweatshopking
            • 2 years ago

            I didn’t say it did, hence me saying “systems.” Which nation do you think has a functional government? I’m not even an American.

            • Chrispy_
            • 2 years ago

            Almost all governments in the EU are required to treat personal data and privacy very carefully.

            The EU is far from perfect, but human rights are way up on the list and they’re not just talking about it, stuff gets done and violations are punished, hard.

            • sweatshopking
            • 2 years ago

            No, they’re not. They’re given slaps on the wrist, that almost never come close to covering the profits made. I agree that the eu works better than almost anyone, including the terrible governments of the nations they work with. But they don’t go far enough

            • End User
            • 2 years ago

            Market share means nothing. Profit is the true measure of success.

            • sweatshopking
            • 2 years ago

            Nope. This is nonsense.

            • End User
            • 2 years ago

            Market share did not help Microsoft and it’s not doing any favours for Android.

            • sweatshopking
            • 2 years ago

            Market share for what? The market changed and computing became a heck of a lot more shapes, and Microsoft suddenly became a small player. Android dominates the world. Apple can make money but it’s less and less relevant.

            • Kretschmer
            • 2 years ago

            We’ve been hearing that Windows was dead on the desktop for at least a decade, now. I think that Microsoft will dominate that space – especially in the office – until the desktop + flatscreen paradigm is completely abandoned in favor of something like augmented reality, neural controls, or the like.

            • sweatshopking
            • 2 years ago

            That’s simply untrue. Android/chrome is making serious inroads. They have a huge market to take over, but the writing is on the wall.

            • blastdoor
            • 2 years ago

            Where I work, the CIO was recently replaced in part because he staunchly resisted the cloud and BYOD, and insisted on an all Microsoft solution to everything. That kind of guy was Microsoft’s bread and butter. It remains to be seen what our new CIO will do, but I’ve been hearing a lot about AWS.

            • sweatshopking
            • 2 years ago

            Microsoft cloud is [i<] excellent [/i<] and shouldn't be discounted. AWS is excellent too, but that market is really a two horse race. Microsoft often does have very good products for enterprise, and they're well integrated. Resisting the cloud is goofy though. A good CIO would consider all options.

            • blastdoor
            • 2 years ago

            Yeah, it was a little goofy. Which I guess is part of why he’s gone.

            I honestly don’t know enough about AWS or Microsoft’s cloud offerings to compare them.

        • K-L-Waster
        • 2 years ago

        As far as phones and tablets go, I’m not sure that Android won (inexplicably there are still bazillions of fruity iDevices out there….). Windows is no longer a player in that war, true, but the war isn’t over yet.

        On the desktop, I would be stunned if Windows gets kicked out by anything any time soon, simply because there are no competitors with any serious install share or momentum. Linux On the Desktop has been coming “any day now” for the past, what, 10 – 15 years? Closest competitor is Mac, and it’s not exactly close.

        None of which explains why they put their most dumbed down and least effective GUI on a server OS where most of the admins would really rather be using command line anyway…

          • sweatshopking
          • 2 years ago

          Have you seen the chrome sales numbers? With android apps Microsoft will quickly lose the consumer “computer” market, as they lost in the phone market, and byod and consumer preference will drive the shift. Not only that, but google OWNS education in North America. Every single public student in my province is required to have a google account for public school, and it’s setup automatically. There are no google alternatives taught in schools, only good products taught and used. you can say they’ll learn when they get out, but an entire generation of kids are learning google slides only, and that’s where they’ll go first. Microsoft is right to shift away from OS development. They’re done.

      • Flying Fox
      • 2 years ago

      [quote<]The fact that Server 2012 and 2016 were touchscreen, gesture-controlled, mobile-first products was infuriatingly stupid and dumb for a product that is largely used for SSH and RDP sessions that don't support touchscreen, gesture-controlled, mobile-first interfaces.[/quote<]I can only agree up to a point, especially when you are talking about Server. It really depends on which SKU you are talking about. On 2012 RTM, yes, it was as bad as they got due to the complete lack of the start button. On R2 it was much better with the return of the Start button (and Sinovsky being gone by then). 2016 is a totally different animal. Desktop mode (which is very much RDP-able) is the default, Edge is nowhere to be found (and websites default to IE11), and craziness like Cortana is not enabled by default. And then you have the totally headless Nano SKU where it is designed for thin hypervisor hosts or containers which should be pleasing those SSH/RDP fans, no?

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        Fair point about 2016. It’s not mobile-first, unlike 2012 and 2012R2, but it’s still riddled with features and UI mess that is clearly for consumer client-OS functionality first and foremost.

        I actually like 2016, and wish that Windows 10 was more like it (2016 is basically W10 without the advertising, tracking, monetisation, and exploitation of the user) But I only like it because it’s better than anything else Microsoft make. it’s still not the finished successor to W7 that Microsoft have been working towards for years and it still suffers from this half-assed, half-finished [s<]Metro[/s<] Modern UI rubbish that makes the experience painful and schizophrenic.

          • sweatshopking
          • 2 years ago

          Modern UI is vastly better than the my little pony sparkle magic of 7. The transition is taking time, but that’s not surprising. Every version has more consistency. Now if you just don’t LIKE the flat design, well, that’s not changing, and you’re stuck with it.

            • Chrispy_
            • 2 years ago

            No, you’re misunderstanding the common gripe with Modern UI. It’s not the flat graphical style that is the major bugbear for most people – it’s the three key problems of usability that get on most people’s nerves:

            [list<][*<]Low information density - the large buttons and icons are designed to be touch-friendly and items are spaced out to make them easier to mash with your finger. The result is huge amounts of empty space that many would prefer was used for content.[/*<][*<]Incomplete - many (if not all) of the OS functionality is still missing from Modern UI variants. It fits the casual users who would be happy with an iPad instead but it's irritating for technically-capable, power-users, enthusiasts, and sysadmins. They are in fact so unusable at a higher level that Microsoft support specialists don't even touch them - launching the legacy controls direct from run dialog in 99% of cases. Why? They are incomplete and in some cases genuinely broken because they are only surface-deep still, even this long after Windows 8 was announced.[/*<][*<]Single-instance limitations. Want to have network settings and connected devices open at the same time? Tough. It's Microsoft Windows, not Microsoft [i<]Window[/i<], ffs.[/*<][/list<] The flat graphical style of 8 onwards is not welcomed by a lot of people but it's absolutely critical to not drown out the genuine, severe usability problems of Modern UI with somewhat insignificant whining about something as minor as [i<]how it looks[/i<].

            • sweatshopking
            • 2 years ago

            – you can resize modern icons, so make them small. This has been possible for [i<] years. [/i<] I get my position is an unpopular one, but if you don't know you can do that by now, you really should, and if you do know then you should stop complaining about it. - yeah, this is taking a while to migrate 30 years of OS applications to a new format, unsurprising, a work in progress, and can be annoying right now. luckily legacy applications still exist for those who want them. - I also would like multiple settings windows. ol well, it's hardly the end of the world for my use.

            • Flying Fox
            • 2 years ago

            I think he meant icons and buttons used in the app UIs, not Start Menu icons/live tiles where you can resize them.

            • sweatshopking
            • 2 years ago

            App ui is up to app developers. Windows ui resizes or is resizable.

            • Chrispy_
            • 2 years ago

            This!

            Compare – for example – the legacy “Programs and Features” list with the new “Apps and Features”. The new one has 50% more white space and a whole bunch of irrelevant links to other settings. I mean, WTF do the following things have to do with Apps and Features?
            [list<][*<]Offline maps[/*<][*<]Video playback[/*<][*<]'Make Windows better' feedback[/*<][/list<] Then there's the density - At 1440p side-by-side the legacy and Modern UI show roughly the same information but... The legacy panel: [list<][*<]has 58 items in the list by default[/*<][*<]is sortable ascending and descending by five columns[/*<][*<]has varying density options from 12 per page to 200[/*<][*<]Support right-click context menus.[/*<][/list<] The Modern UI panel: [list<][*<]has 14 items in the list, and you can't change this[/*<][*<]can be sorted only by three columns and you can't sort by descending/ascending[/*<][*<]has no density or extra detail options[/*<][*<]has combined entries with no way to differentiate between x86 and x64 if both are installed[/*<][*<]has no way to see what versions of a program are installed if you're testing/using multiple concurrent versions of the same application[/*<][*<]is left-click only (tablet-friendly for your mousing inconvenience)[/*<][/list<] So, that's just [i<]one[/i<] of the 100+ Modern UI "improvements" in the OS alone: Feature-incomplete, only one-quarter the information density, inefficient for sorting and lacking both functionality and options. Thanks Microsoft, great job? :\

            • End User
            • 2 years ago

            “Incomplete”

            +3

            After all this time why are there still old UI elements in Windows 10. It is atrocious.

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