Intel makes Coffee Lake Celeron and Pentium Gold chips official

When word started circulating that Intel would be following up Kaby Lake with a round of eighth-generation CPUs built on a 14nm++ process, logic dictated that less-expensive Celeron and Pentium-branded offerings would follow. We've written once, twice, and thrice about those rumored cheaper chips, and now they're here. As rumored, Intel is introducing three new Celeron models and five new Pentium Gold models just in time for the mainstream H370, B360, and H110 chipset releases.

Intel bestows all new Pentium Gold chips with two cores and Hyper-Threading, while Celerons make do with two cores and only two hardware threads. T-model chips are a little slower and cost the same as their suffix-less brethren, but consume less power and need less-robust cooling apparatus. Intel introducted Hyper-Threading to Pentium chips in its seventh-generation Core products, but Turbo Boost is still reserved for Core i5 models and above.

Model number Clock speed Cores/threads L3 cache TDP List price
Pentium Gold G5600 3.9 GHz 2/4 4MB 54W $86
Pentium Gold G5500 3.8 GHz 2/4 4MB 54W $75
Pentium Gold G5500T 3.2 GHz 2/4 4MB 35W $75
Pentium Gold G5400 3.7 GHz 2/4 4MB 58W $64
Pentium Gold G5400T 3.1 GHz 2/4 4MB 35W $64
Celeron G4920 3.2 GHz 2/2 2MB 54W $52
Celeron G4900 3.1 GHz 2/2 2MB 54W $42
Celeron G4900T 2.9 GHz 2/2 2MB 35W $42

The new models' changes when compared to Kaby Lake Pentiums and Celerons are pretty small, consisting primarily of minor clock speed bumps, compatibility with Intel's newest desktop motherboard chipsets, and rebadged "UHD" IGPs. Prices are exactly the same as the seventh-generation models for chips at the same position in the product stack. The entry-level Pentium Gold G5400 has the same $64 list price as the corresponding Pentium G4560, the new G5500 costs the same $75 as old midrange G4600, and the G5600 has the same $86 price tag that used to come attached to the Pentium Gold G4620.

As for the new Celerons, the processor market around the $50 price point is as unexciting as one would expect. The new chips all hang out within 200 MHz of 3 GHz and have two cores and two threads to work with. The Celeron G4900 and G4900T ring in at $42, and the slightly-faster 4920 enters the fray at $10 more.

These new models all look pretty competent for basic PCs in their respective price brackets considering the generally-good single-threaded performance the chips offer. AMD has a single Zen chip in the bargain-bin space: the Ryzen 3 2200G at $99.99. However, that chip's graphics chops are worlds ahead of Intel's desktop IGPs, so gamers putting off a graphics card purchase until the market calms down could be better-served dropping the additional coin on an AMD rig.

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    Kinda crazy how the PentiumĀ® brand is actually 25 years old now.

    • Krogoth
    • 2 years ago

    I’m wondering if these are actually defective Coffee Lake silicon or just rebranded Kaby Lake silicon.

      • HERETIC
      • 2 years ago

      If they were broken Kaby Lake,what are they doing with broken Coffee Lake?

    • synthtel2
    • 2 years ago

    More chips with their big cores but without AVX, more than seven years after AVX’s introduction. :/

      • ronch
      • 2 years ago

      Gotta love Intel’s ways of market segmentation. Still, if I’m building a PC for granny to watch videos and check email with, or an office box with one of these chipperies, AVX won’t be missed. But that’s just me.But being me, I’d probably get a Ryzen 3 or even a cheap, lowly A8-7600 instead.

        • Eversor
        • 2 years ago

        It depends. Video codecs are among the most important users of vector instructions and if you’re talking laptops the only way to support newer stuff is through software. You may loose out on enough performance to support e.g. AV1.

        As an example, VP9 decoding works great – 1080p60 – on anything with Supplemental SSE3 (Core 2+) but not on AMD equivalents that lack those instructions.

      • Eversor
      • 2 years ago

      Indeed. On eBay, 3rd generation i5’s can be had for close to $50, being considerably faster for everything but the GPU.
      4th gen are probably also going down now but haven’t checked.
      Just find a board with solid capacitors all around and durability on that used part should also not be a problem.

      Can’t recommend it exclusively for gaming unless you also pair it with DDR3-1866+ and a motherboard capable of using it though (B75+ iirc) – min frame rates will be considerably affected by the higher latencies.

    • MOSFET
    • 2 years ago

    Just changing the leading digit 4 to 5 was too simple, or too complicated? I’m ocnfsued.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    One thing to note is that these seem to have only GT1 graphics (UHD 610) according to Intel’s ARK entry for them.

    Anyone buying this to prop up a dGPU obviously won’t care, but unlike the UHD 620 graphics, these budget chips are going to struggle with even lightweight games like DOTA2, Rocket League, Subnautica etc.

    It sounds silly, but if you’re not in the market for the Ryzen 3 2200G, but actually want to use the integrated graphics of a Pentium for casual gaming, you’re probably far better off with the older Kaby Lake Pentium G4600 – it’s going to be almost indistinguishable to the Coffee Lake models, but you’ll be getting nearly double the IGP for the same money.

      • Eversor
      • 2 years ago

      As per Intel ARK, G5500+ is UHD 630 and have +1MB of cache compared with G4xxx.

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        Ah, good. well spotted. I looked at the G5400 because the cheapest non-T variant has always been the best option.

        Let’s face, it a 2.7% clock speed bump has never been worth anything more than 2.7% more money, let alone the 17% price hike they’re asking for. If that gets you 100% more graphics horsepower it’s a completely different matter.

        All hail the G5500, this year’s G4560!

          • Eversor
          • 2 years ago

          Yeah, I agree. Though at this time, the new boards are so expensive they’re commanding a $25 premium around here. Add another $20 for G5500 from G4600 (the xHD 630 parts) and it’s a $45 premium for an upgrade path to hexa cores.

          Even video decoding capabilities I think are the same, so if you care for the GPU I think you’re going to pay the premium and go with Ryzen 2200G. All that leaves the new UHD 630 parts in an bad spot if they’re only available for the list price.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    A 3.7GHz i3 for $64? Thanks, AMD!

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      Don’t even get me started with how AMD invented Apple’s 2020 miracle chip single handedly!

      • EndlessWaves
      • 2 years ago

      Intel first enabled Hyper-threading on the Broadwell Pentium 3825U, two years before the first Ryzen chips launched.

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        True, but those weren’t chips that consumers can buy, because they were soldered into OEM boards (usually laptops).

    • homerdog
    • 2 years ago

    That G5400 for 64 bucks should be a solid budget gamer. I’d still go for a real quad core if at all possible.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 2 years ago

      The PentiumĀ® Gold G5500 has much more capable graphics for $11 more.
      [url<]https://ark.intel.com/products/codename/97787/Coffee-Lake#@desktop[/url<]

      • tipoo
      • 2 years ago

      Sigh, all these great budget parts come out and RAM and NAND blow up at the same time.

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    OMG STOP WITH THE INTEL STUFF!

    Look: [url=https://www.reddit.com/r/Amd/comments/86vtcv/canard_pc_magazine_ryzen_2000_series/<]OMG Ryzen 2700X[/url<] that Lisa Su forgot to show off on Youtube!

      • HERETIC
      • 2 years ago

      Have patience-in a few weeks it’ll be ALL AMD………………………….

      • Khali
      • 2 years ago

      You know Chuck, it was funny when you co-opted the AMD crowds side of the debate. Instantly shut them all down. But at this point its gotten boring, predictable, and edging into the realm of annoying.

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