EVGA’s SuperNova PQ PSUs look powerful and quiet

EVGA is primarily known for its Nvidia-powered graphics cards, but the company's PSUs rectify and condition power for many users' computer systems, including a couple of my own. The company's latest SuperNova PQ Series power supplies are designed for system builders and upgraders looking for premium components, high efficiency, and a long warranty. Today's rollout includes 750-W, 850-W, and 1000-W models.

EVGA says the 100%-Japanese capacitors and the active-clamp circuit design used in the PQ PSUs help contribute to the units' 80-Plus Platinum efficiency rating. That label means the units should be capable of 92% or higher efficiency under "typical loads." The manufacturer touts 83.3 A from the largest model's single 12-V rail, a current level higher than many automotive battery chargers are capable of delivering. The 850-W model claims to deliver 70.8 A in the same metric, and smallest unit offers a still-stout 62.5 A.

Silence-seekers might choose EVGA's SuperNova PQ-series PSUs for the Eco mode feature that makes the large-diameter 135-mm fan sit still until needed. The company's charts suggests the 1000-W model must be pushed to about 30% of its maximum output before the fan starts spinning.

Builders looking for clean looks to go along with smooth and stable power delivery will doubtless delight in the mostly-modular, all-black cabling. The 24-pin ATX power connector wiring is shrouded in PET sleeving and is permanently affixed to the power supply. The rest of the cables use ribbon-style wires and can be disconnected when not needed. Given that just about every application will require the 24-pin connector, this should make tidy wiring jobs less of a hassle. The included cables can be swapped out for EVGA's individually-sleeved cable kits in the event that some color is desired. The included cable selection varies by model, but all units include two EPS cables for CPU power and at least four PCIe power cables.

EVGA backs its SuperNova PQ Series power supplies with a ten-year warranty. The PSUs are up for pre-order now at Newegg. The SuperNova 750 PQ starts the party at $140, the 850 PQ is a bit pricier at $160, and getting that juicy SuperNova 1000 PQ will set buyers back $210. The e-tailer says units should start shipping on April 11.

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    It’s kinda interesting to note that the way today’s PSUs are set up hasn’t changed since the dawn of personal computers. They’re still this metal box with a circular window with a fan in it.

      • Khali
      • 2 years ago

      How would you do it different?

      Form follows function and they just got it right way back when. I think the saying “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” applies to PSU’s.

        • ronch
        • 2 years ago

        Never implied that they should change it. It just gives me fond memories of my XT days.

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 2 years ago

        He just made an observation. I’m usually the first to reply to ronch when i think he says something silly..but he just pointed out what he saw. Give the guy a break.

        EDIT:

        What are you even going on about?

        Someone please take away this person’s permission to post.

          • Khali
          • 2 years ago

          I wasn’t giving him a hard time. I was just curious how he would improve on something that just seems perfect as is.

          As for removing my permissions to post, I’m not the one with the reputation for urinating in everyone’s Cheerios because I didn’t like what they posted. Your still posting so I figure I’m safe.

            • Srsly_Bro
            • 2 years ago

            You’re*

            • ronch
            • 2 years ago

            How did you even think that I was thinking about improving it. If you read my post again I only said that “it’s interesting to note…”.

          • ronch
          • 2 years ago

          Silly? Like what?

            • Srsly_Bro
            • 2 years ago

            Can’t think of an example. I’ve commented on some things and smh at them, but I had your back on this one. Khali went overboard imo.

            • ronch
            • 2 years ago

            Whoa thanks, bro. Srsly.

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 2 years ago

        One of the interesting approaches for compact cases has been Silverstone’s offering adapter plates to mount smaller [url=http://www.silverstonetek.com/product_power.php?tno=7&area=en<]SFX (or SFX-L)[/url<] power supplies to the standard 150mm x 86mm hole in ATX cases. More recently, I applaud SeaSonic's [url=https://seasonic.com/focus-plus-gold<]Focus[b<]+[/b<][/url<] PSU line for returning us to a manageable 140 mm depth. Some bloated enthusiast-oriented PSUs had grown to 200 mm and beyond.

      • DavidC1
      • 2 years ago

      Yeah, its almost like the expectation we’d be wearing bright, fluorescent colored jump suits because we are in the future. And houses would look like giant tin foil hats.

      • Bauxite
      • 2 years ago

      The difference is on the inside, 3kW N+1 design at 94% efficiency would blow the minds of someone from the 80s. Then you tell them the typical operating voltage of a cpu today and their head explodes.

        • ronch
        • 2 years ago

        I think it would be the performance and clock speeds of today’s CPUs that will cause their heads to explode. Then show them what sort of sorcery graphics cards today can conjure, just for good measure.

          • JustAnEngineer
          • 2 years ago

          I carry around much more computing power in my pocket than we ran hundreds of simultaneous users on when I was in college….

          The most amazing advancement, however, is the world wide web. Google, Wikipedia and Amazon let you do things with your smart phone that were fantastic science fiction when I was a child.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    I guess there will always be cryptocurrency mining on multiple GPUs, but for most people the hungriest GPU available (over-volted to within an inch of its life) is only 400W or so, and SLI/Crossfire has been proven time and time again to offer marginal real-world benefits to frame-latency.

    A more typical top-of-the-line system tends to pull 400W from the wall at full load, and that’s AFTER the 8% efficiency drop of PSU is measured. So we’re talking 370W and that makes even a 750W supply overkill.

      • DavidC1
      • 2 years ago

      350-400W can be a good match for a 750W supply. 50% is an ideal load for long term operation, and its at where the peak efficiency is reached.

      Above that, maybe you have multiple NVMe drives and overclocked 8700K, or heck, SKL-X CPUs.

        • Khali
        • 2 years ago

        That is how I approach the subject. Figure out what you need then double it. You then, ideally, end up with a PSU running at peak efficiency and you provide some room for adding in new components, (more drives, more powerful GPU upgrade, etc) in the future.

          • JustAnEngineer
          • 2 years ago

          If you buy a SeaSonic PSU, it will run all day at 90-100% of nominal capacity without a complaint. If your PSU is from DEER or Best or Allied, you may not be safe at 50% of their claimed power capacity.

            • ptsant
            • 2 years ago

            Used a Seasonic 750W Platinum PSU for mining back when it was new and interesting. Run it at 70% for months. Still works like a charm after 6 years.

            The premium Seasonic PSUs are ridiculously over-engineered.

            • moose17145
            • 2 years ago

            At least you know what your money went into when you purchase a quality product like that. 🙂

        • smilingcrow
        • 2 years ago

        The difference in efficiency between running at 50 or 75% of full power output is only about 1.5 to 2% for the gold and platinum PSUs I looked at and nearer 0.5% for the single titanium unit.
        If you are that concerned about ~2% of efficiency then buy a titanium unit.

      • moose17145
      • 2 years ago

      True that a “typical” top of the line system can get by with a 750 watt PSU easily. But that does not mean that there is not a market for larger PSUs outside of the crypto miners. I suspect there are several people on this site, like myself, who has a system which goes a bit beyond “typical high end PC power requirements”.

      I have clocked my system pulling easily over 700 watts of power when everything in it is under full load. Especially if I feel like tinkering around with overclocking. Given the typical quality of EVGA PSUs, I am sure that the 750 watt unit could probably handle it, but I do not really like running my PSUs close to their peak rating like that, even if the system isn’t under a full load like that for more than a few hours at a time.

      Even if your computer does not fall outside of “typical”, there is still a market for over sized semi-fanless PSUs for those who want silent computing. I have seen people buy a 1,000 watt unit (like the one in this article) for a system that would not be able to draw more than 250 watts of power even under full load, just because they never wanted that fan to ever spin up (but obviously wanted a fan in the unit in case the PSU sensed it was overheating and needed to spin up. A slight bit of noise is far preferable to a burned up PSU / Computer, afterall).

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 2 years ago

      Who here wants to run their PSU at 75-100% capacity???

      No one with sense, and that excludes you.

      The cost between what you suggest and a decent 750W isn’t enough to justify such argument so why the argument?

      I can’t even go on anymore.

      Someone needs to take away your permission to post.

      [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LQCU36pkH7c[/url<]

        • Bauxite
        • 2 years ago

        Dirty little secret:

        Premium (actual, not just price) “750W” or similar PSUs are actually easily ~1kW units inside with a slightly different configuration and lower OCP/shutoff. The good ones are overbuilt as hell and designed to hold up at 50C even though yours will probably be sitting at a pretty <30C.

        You can run them at “100%” for years just fine and the company will stay profitable despite the long warranty (some 12 years now) as the MTBF and other analysis on these kind of components has decades of data. If you tweaked them a little bit and didn’t mind more failures, looser tolerances (and less safety) and lower efficiency they could probably run something like double the rated load for quite awhile.

        The “50%” and similar “internet wisdom” are not really based on the complicated reality, kinda like most “common sense” ideas and solutions out there.

          • Srsly_Bro
          • 2 years ago

          Nice explanation. Thanks, bro. +1

          • Chrispy_
          • 2 years ago

          Pretty much this.

          Also, when you consider that your PC uses up to 400W absolute peak, it’s not actually using 400W very often. If the GPU is at 100%, the CPU is probably stalled, waiting for it. If your drives are running at full load, your GPU is likely idle and your CPU is almost idle.

          The “peak” synthetic tests that are used to determine maximum system power draw are largely not real-world numbers. If you PSU is at 80% load for these worst-case peaks, it’s probably under 50% load most of the rest of the time under load.

          I don’t know how accurate my kill-a-watt is, but my 84W CPU and 210W GPU ought to be pulling 294W DC from the PSU and about 330W from the wall, even if I ignore everything else in my system. Witcher 3 resulted in ~220W because simultaneous 100% peak CPU and GPU utilisation simply isn’t a realistic scenario.

            • Srsly_Bro
            • 2 years ago

            TDP is not power consumption. Your entire premise is flawed.

            • Chrispy_
            • 2 years ago

            TDP is the power consumption [i<]target[/i<] at full load. There are transient peaks in power consumption above this load but over time, the power consumption should match the TDP.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This