HyperX Pulsefire Surge cuts the cruft

It wasn't all that long ago that if you wanted a mouse with a fancy sensor, you had to deal with all sorts of gimmicky features you probably didn't care about. Nowadays there's a number of mice out there based on top-class hardware without unnecessary cruft. One such pointer-pusher is HyperX's Pulsefire Surge. This simple six-button ambidextrous design echoes an earlier era of mouse chic.

Not to be confused with the company's entry-level Pulsefire FPS, the Surge is a true high-end gaming mouse. It sports Pixart's latest production, the PMW3389. That's an infrared LED sensor that boasts an optical resolution of up to 16,000 DPI and is capable of tracking at up to 400 inches per second (over 10 m/s). We're not sure that kind of performance is strictly necessary, but we suppose it's better to overshoot the limits of human capability than not.

Like most high-end mice, the Pulsefire Surge has onboard memory to which it can save your settings for its six buttons. There's macro programming on tap, along with various advanced sensor configuration options. You can configure the RGB LED lighting on a per-LED basis, too. Folks who fancy a simple mouse with top-shelf performance can pick up a HyperX Pulsefire Surge on Amazon for $70.

Comments closed
    • atarisan
    • 2 years ago

    This sounds like what Pluggable’s USB-PM3360 is for me. A cheap reliable no-nonsense mouse that has everything I need. Only Pluggable’s mouse is 1/3 the price.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    Per-LED customisable RGBLED, macro-programming, a $70 price tag.

    Is that not the [i<]very definition[/i<] of unnecessary cruft?

    • Captain Ned
    • 2 years ago

    Now just put that in an MSIE 3.0 body and I’ll buy several.

    • DPete27
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]Cuts the cruft[/quote<] My Logitech Proteus Core 502 for $30 would beg to differ. Nice try Kingston, but you can keep your RGB fad.

    • Waco
    • 2 years ago

    “Cuts the cruft” in my mind doesn’t apply to an RGB-festooned [i<]anything[/i<] unless you're literally buying an LED light strip...

      • kuraegomon
      • 2 years ago

      Your use of “festooned” is a little hyperbolic in this case. The application of said LEDs is simple and clean. Compared to any number of other “gaming” mice that look like they want to eat your hand, this device is a model of restraint – which was Zak’s point.

        • Waco
        • 2 years ago

        I guess. I’m tired of the “RGB all the things” marketing these days and it makes me more irritable than usual. 🙂

          • kuraegomon
          • 2 years ago

          That’s pretty understandable. The only RGB LEDs that I haven’t been able to avoid to this point are integrated in video cards… and I don’t plan on buying this mouse either. So I suspect I’m mostly in your camp on this subject 🙂

          • Redocbew
          • 2 years ago

          The last mouse I bought has some blue LEDs on it which of course I can’t even see when I’m using it. I love the mouse, so I forgive the gratuitous lighting, and at least now I could find it in the dark, or something.

            • Waco
            • 2 years ago

            Mine has red LEDs but I forgive that transgression since it is incredibly comfortable. Epicgear Meduza.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 2 years ago

      +3 for “festooned”, hyperbolic or not

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 2 years ago

        Festoons follow the [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catenary<]catenary[/url<] curve, which is the [b<]hyperbolic[/b<] cosine.

    • DancinJack
    • 2 years ago

    Actually doesn’t look half bad! I’m not a huge fan of those ridge-y scroll wheels though. I like mine to be a bit smoother.

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