HP Pavilion Gaming Laptop 15 shows off new styling and new CPUs

Lately, HP's efforts at wooing gamers looking for portable power have been mostly limited to the company's high-end Omen lineup. The PC maker is going after the big group of folks that want a slim laptop with gaming capabilities for less than a couple grand with its refreshed Pavilion Gaming Laptop 15. In typical HP fashion, buyers have tons of options for the Gaming 15. Shoppers get multiple choices for processor sub-family, discrete graphics cards, display type, plus the usual variations in memory and storage capacity.

The Gaming 15's processor choices all hail from Intel's eighth-generation Core family, but buyers can select from lower-power U-series models or hard-hitting H-series varieties. HP didn't name any specific CPU models, but it did say six-core silicon would be available. The machine has an M.2 slot and a 2.5" bay for storage devices, ready to be filled with just a 2-TB hard drive, a 256-GB SSD by itself, or dual-storage options that come with both. HP will also offer Core i+ configurations with a hard drive and a 16-GB Intel Optane Memory device.

As for the gaming-specific hardware, the screen is always a 15.6" unit, but buyers get to pick from 1920×1080 panels that refresh at either 60 or 144 Hz, or a 3840×2160 version that changes 60 times per second. The pixel panel gets marching orders from cards including AMD's Radeon RX 560X and Nvidia's GeForce GTX 1060 Max-Q. HP says the speakers mounted to the keyboard deck surface were designed in conjunction with audio specialist Bang & Olufsen.

Onlookers will be able to pick out players that dropped the extra scratch for the faster H-series versions of the Pavillion Gaming Laptop 15 thanks to an aluminum-finished keyboard deck and "acid green," "ghost white," or "ultraviolet" keyboard lighting and I/O labels. Gaming 15s with U-series chips get a black plastic keyboard trim and white embellishments. The keyboard backlight is optional on these models.

HP's Pavilion Gaming Laptop 15 will go on sale on May 27. Prices start at $799 for the base model, though the manufacturer didn't say what hardware buyers would get for that amount.

Comments closed
    • DavidC1
    • 2 years ago

    I’m trying to think of the logic of having both Pavillion gaming and Omen series. Why not introduce a cheaper Omen? Is it because they see that as somehow tarnishing the Omen brand?

    This is why HP has so many product lines and why their site is almost impossible to navigate.

    They have the Envy X360’s. They have the Pavillion X360’s, and they have the Spectre X360’s. Why? That’s just for consumer ultrabook 2-in-1s. Same with their business lines and workstations.

    Other manufacturers do this, but not quite as bad as HP. I think Dell is the simplest.

    Samsung is just as bad as HP, but for everything else.

      • WayneManion
      • 2 years ago

      FWIW, Alienware belongs to Dell. HP’s gaming sub-brand is Omen.

        • DavidC1
        • 2 years ago

        Right, post changed.

      • tipoo
      • 2 years ago

      ‘Member when the names they adopted from Voodoo meant something? I ‘Member

      [url<]http://s3images.coroflot.com/user_files/individual_files/original_101122_FTjI_SOka6TomjFjZsSHWQoWF.jpg[/url<]

    • kvndoom
    • 2 years ago

    I really hate these flat keyboards and find them extremely hard to type on. Some of our HP desktops at work have flat full-size keyboards and they are simply miserable to use.

    I’m not fond of them on laptops either.

    • tipoo
    • 2 years ago

    Sans the acid green, this is pleasantly minimal for what it is. GG.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    So many of these consumer laptops are starting to fall into the plastic base attached to plastic deck category. I’m ignoring aluminium finishes on the keyboard deck, since they are of no structural use.

    It never used to be a problem but with laptops getting thinner and thinner, the lack of at least a magnesium plate between the keyboard deck and the motherboard has turned the midrange laptop market into a world of creaky, fragile, and cheap-feeling mushiness with oftentimes more keyboard flex than intentional keyboard travel.

    Now, I’m NOT saying that these laptops fall into this category because I simply don’t know and manufacturers don’t bother listing the construction type. Sure, they’ll lie by omission and do everything in their power to make silver plastic look like metal, but it’s really hard to tell and I know that HP’s previous midrange laptops all fall into the ‘spongy mess’ category despite otherwise attractive styling and specs for the money.

      • tipoo
      • 2 years ago

      That’s a good observation I never quite put to words. The midrange laptops of yesteryear had those magnesium frames to hold everything together, now I wonder about the lifespan issues with heat flex in nearly purely plastic ones, let alone keyboard flex.

      If they did better in this one, great.

    • YukaKun
    • 2 years ago

    That’s a nice looking Alienw–Wait… HP Pavilion?

    MADNESS!

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