Dell drops Ryzen APUs into the 13″ Inspiron 7000 2-in-1

Buyers thirsting for AMD's Ryzen APUs' attractive blend of multi-core CPU performance and modern Radeon Vega graphics might have something to look forward to. Dell's latest Inspiron 7000 13 2-in-1 isn't the company's first Ryzen-powered portable or the first hybrid notebook with a backward-folding hinge carrying the unique chip, but it is the first 13" 2-in-1 we can recall with a Ryzen APU.

Ryzen 5 2500U and Ryzen 7 2700U APUs are on offer. The lesser chip sports integrated Vega 8 graphics while its bigger brother is equipped with a Vega 10 IGP. Base models of the Inspiron 7000 13 convertible come with 8 GB of RAM, and step-up models are fitted with 12 GB. Dell says the maximum supported memory capacity is a relatively-limited 16 GB.

All versions of the notebook get a 256-GB SSD. Some might have trouble fitting everything they need on that amount of space, but we're happy to not see a sluggish hard-drive-only variant. All AMD-powered Inspiron 7000 13 2-in-1s get the same 1920×1080 IPS touchscreen display. Dell doesn't talk about the refresh rate, but the mainstream nature of the machines probably means it's the usual 60 Hz. The keyboard is backlit, and the webcam supports Windows Hello feature thanks to its infrared capabilities.

The Inspiron 7000 measures 12.7" wide, 8.8" deep, and 0.8" thick (32 cm x 22 cm x 1.9 cm) and weighs 3.9 lbs (1.8 kg). Dell doesn't say a word about battery life expectancy, but the included pack is a three-cell number with a 42-WHr capacity. Hopefully the Inspiron can spend more time away from a wall outlet than the Ryzen-packing HP Envy x360 did in our testing. The sides of the machine are studded with an HDMI 1.4 display output, two USB Type-A ports, and one Type-C connector. We're a bit disappointed about the HDMI 1.4 connector given the Ryzen APU's ability to handle 3840×2160 resolution, though. Users can connect to a network using the built-in 1×1 802.11ac Wi-Fi.

The Dell Inspiron 7000 2-in-1 with AMD's Ryzen APU starts at $730. That much scratch nets buyers a machine with a 13.3" IPS touchscreen display, a Ryzen 5 2500U processor with Vega 8 graphics, 8 GB of 2400 MT/s DDR4 memory, and a 256-GB SSD. A quicker configuration with a Ryzen 7 2700U APU and 12 GB of memory is available for $880. For comparison's sake, a unit with the same memory and storage configuration coupled with an Intel Core i5-8250U processor costs $850. Dell backs the machines with a one-year warranty.

Comments closed
    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    It’s not the best deal but at least it’s not insultingly expensive or hobbled by silly component choices.

    The MX150’d Acer Swift 3 is around $680 for the same quality-level alloy chassis, 1080p, IPS, 8GB and 256GB configuration, so the Dell is obviously a worse performer and $50 more expensive – but with the 2-in-1 functionality at least.

    You’d need to be really sold on the 2-in-1 format to want this – especially since the reviews of the 13″ 7000 2-in-1 are pretty damning of the terrible battery life – but at the same time, the Swift’s list price is $799, so perhaps this will start to crop up at a more appealing $650 once it hits the stores.

    • juzz86
    • 2 years ago

    Saw that top photo and thought

    ‘That’s a lot of fan for a little laptop!’

    A mixer, I am not.

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    So at $880 with Vega graphics, is this a better deal than the one with an Intel 8250U at $850?

      • Pancake
      • 2 years ago

      What do you want out of a laptop in that form factor?

      Battery life or graphics performance? CPU performance is likely a wash – they’re both perfectly acceptable.

      I would guess most people will choose battery life. I did and spent my hard earned on an HP Envy with Intel. I’m a programmer and use my laptop for mainly writing code and web browsing. The mentally insane battery life is a huge factor.

      If you can wait a couple of months I would expect the Dell Inspiron with Ryzen to be at fire sale discount prices. Because they won’t be able to sell the things and there’s a new Ryzen Mobile processor imminent. Then you can buy a sub-par gaming ultrabook with rubbish battery life at a low price. But you get what you pay for.

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    Went straight to the comments section to know what’s wrong with these things. Like being single channel, cheap TN .. those things.

      • thx1138r
      • 2 years ago

      Maybe you should actually read the article, because the screen is a 1080p IPS and the verdict is still out on the RAM configuration.

        • ronch
        • 2 years ago

        Guess I wanted to go right away and see what people would complain about.

    • Goty
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]Dell doesn't say a word about battery life expectancy, but the included pack is a three-cell number with a 42-WHr capacity. Hopefully the Inspiron can spend more time away from a wall outlet than the Ryzen-packing HP Envy x360 did in our testing.[/quote<] The battery in the Inspiron is only a few percent larger relative to screen area than the one in the Envy x360, so it should be an interesting battery life comparison.

    • DPete27
    • 2 years ago

    Assuming the Ryzen 5 2500U 8GB option is single channel then?

      • thx1138r
      • 2 years ago

      The manual says that it has two SODIMM slots:

      [url<]http://www.dell.com/support/manuals/us/en/19/inspiron-13-7375-2-in-1-laptop/inspiron-13-7375-setup-specifications/memory?guid=guid-b9aa1236-df9f-4d84-9116-a22f7cb6cf4a&lang=en-us[/url<] i.e. no soldered RAM which would make the 2x4GB/dual-channel configuration more likely..... hopefully...

        • Goty
        • 2 years ago

        Yeah, but the 12 GB option makes me think it’s 8 or 8+4 (equally dumb), so maybe single channel unless you add another SO-DIMM.

          • thx1138r
          • 2 years ago

          “equally dumb”? It was my understanding that if you use mismatched DIMM sizes then you get a pool of dual-channel RAM and a pool of single channel. So 8+4 would mean you have 8GB of dual channel and 4GB of single channel. Now, assuming your OS puts the single channel memory as the lowest priority then the majority of your RAM is dual-channel, thus this would be far superior to having just 8GB of single channel. If you have any evidence to the contrary I’d like to know.

            • Goty
            • 2 years ago

            I’m not sure you know how the burden of proof works, but if you posit that the memory access in handled in this way (i.e. that the OS will prioritize the dual channel portion), then you are the one that should provide the proof of the statement. That being said, a quick Google search can’t bring up any information on how Windows handles this configuration.

            As it stands, though, I’d rather not be in the situation where I’m using a large portion of my memory and suddenly just have some of it run off into the single channel portion and tank my performance in whatever application I’m currently using. Configurations like this are simply the result of penny-pinching and I’d much prefer to have Dell go with a symmetric memory configuration and just charge me the extra $10 they’re probably paying for an 8GB SO-DIMM over a 4GB stick.

            • thx1138r
            • 2 years ago

            Surely the burden of proof is with the first person to state an opinion without any facts to back it up, i.e. you.

            Also, while having 4GB of slower RAM would have a negative effect on performance, the effect would be far less than not having the RAM in the first place, i.e. swapping out to disk, which really would “tank” performance.

            • Goty
            • 2 years ago

            Here’s the cool thing about opinions; they’re opinions! Thanks for playing, though.

            • thx1138r
            • 2 years ago

            Sorry, I thought you might want to try to back up your opinion. Anyway I’ve had a quick google and the thing that was lurking in the back of my mind is a thing called Flex-mode RAM, it’s what happens when you use mis-matched RAM sizes e.g.:
            [url<]https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/articles/000005657/boards-and-kits.html#flex[/url<] Basically, if you use mismatched DIMM sizes, you get dual-channel over the part that matches and single channel over the remainder. Which, I'm think we can all agree, would be far superior to having just single channel RAM.

            • Goty
            • 2 years ago

            No disagreement there. Dual channel across the entire memory space would be even better, though. 😉

            • thx1138r
            • 2 years ago

            I agree.

      • Waco
      • 2 years ago

      It is, but there’s a free DIMM slot.

    • Veerappan
    • 2 years ago

    The i5-based Inspiron 7000’s also have a supposed 16GB memory limit, but I previously ran across a dell support forum response that just indicates they didn’t bother testing/qualifying any 32GB setups. I wouldn’t be surprised if the Ryzen variant is capped at 16GB for a similar reason.

    Also, this may be the Ryzen-based laptop I’ve been waiting for. Either that, or the Thinkpad A485 that is supposedly coming out in Q3.

      • Airmantharp
      • 2 years ago

      I’d be hoping that they could drop Ryzen APUs into the XPS line- those are conspicuous in that they cannot take an eGPU, so Ryzen would be unique in offering enough CPU power and more GPU power for many users.

      Performance and battery life comparisons in the ultrabook space would be the ultimate contemporary test for serious mobile computing.

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