EK Fluid Gaming line offers turn-key liquid-cooled PCs

Building a basic computer these days is as easy as it's ever been. Building a custom-cooled high-end gaming system is a bigger challenge than many folks want to tackle, and EK Water Blocks has stepped up with new options for buyers that want the bragging rights of an open-loop-cooled rig without the headaches and potential leaks of gathering parts and putting everything together. The company's new Fluid Gaming line of pre-assembled gaming PCs combines quality hardware from well-known manufacturers with the company's expertise in cooling system design and assembly.

For the time being, all of EK's pre-built gaming systems use AMD's spanking-new Ryzen 2000-series processors coupled with Nvidia GeForce graphics cards inside an EK-specific variation of InWin's 101C ATX chassis. All systems get EK's aluminum Fluid Gaming A240G open-loop cooling kit plus an extra 120-mm radiator. The A240G kit includes CPU and graphics card waterblocks, a pump-and-reservoir assembly, clear soft tubing, and a 240-mm radiator with fans. The case has a tempered glass side panel that provides a good look at the high-end gear within. The systems are all powered by EVGA SuperNova G3 power supplies with CableMod cable extension kits. 

The entry-level Hero configuration includes an AMD Ryzen 5 2600 processor, 16 GB of 3200 MT/s G.Skill Trident Z RGB DDR4 memory, an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 6 GB, and a 256-GB Samsung 960 Evo NVMe SSD on an MSI B350 Tomahawk motherboard. A 2-TB Seagate hard drive provides additional storage space.

The top-shelf "Legend" build sports an AMD Ryzen 7 2700X CPU, 32 GB of memory, a pair of Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 graphics cards in SLI, a 1-TB SSD, and a 4-TB hard drive. All that gear comes attached to an MSI X470 Gaming Pro Carbon motherboard.

Buyers should note that EK's Fluid Gaming line uses aluminum components, so adding third-party cooling system components made of copper is not recommended. EK backs all pre-built systems with a two-year warranty. The Hero configuration costs $2100, and the Legend system will set buyers back $4260. EK expects systems to start shipping from its US-based assembly facility in early May.

Comments closed
    • Shobai
    • 2 years ago

    “Render unto Caesar”, etc?

      • Shobai
      • 2 years ago

      No, I can’t leave it alone: is this that PC build simulator? There’s obviously no power, but the case lighting is on and the fans are spinning…

    • derFunkenstein
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<] The systems are all powered by EVGA SuperNova G3 power supplies with CableMod cable extension kits. [/quote<] Those kits must be transparent. Why else would see those un-filled PCI-e and ATX connectors? 😆

    • Waco
    • 2 years ago

    I can’t give EK any of my money after all of the pseudo-science BS they spewed when they had quality issues with their nickel plating.

    • rnalsation
    • 2 years ago

    All I see is a lot of negative pressure and no air filter.

    Edit: Also no PSU.

      • Shobai
      • 2 years ago

      The whole design is weird:

      If you’ve got you radiators mounted to external surfaces, then have them pull in fresh air for best cooling potential, rather than pre-warmed ambient case air

      If your radiators are intakes, then leave the upper surfaces free to exhaust warm air

      • jihadjoe
      • 2 years ago

      #nopower lol

    • Price0331
    • 2 years ago

    Is that a top mounted power supply? How retro.

    • caconym
    • 2 years ago

    How often do you need to add anticoagulant?

    • DPete27
    • 2 years ago

    How do you size reservoirs for custom loops?
    It’s odd to see such a large tank for a 2 rad system when we’ve got AIOs with no real reservoir nowadays.

      • Redocbew
      • 2 years ago

      The size of the reservoir makes no difference for cooling, so just use whatever fits in the case and is easiest to fill/bleed. AIOs are designed to be a closed loop with all of the air purged from the loop during initial assembly, so there’s no reason to have much of a reservoir at all.

      • ColeLT1
      • 2 years ago

      Any size really, I use a swiftech micro res and lose about half a fluid ounce a year or less. Some people still use a T block and just a few inches of a capped off hose as a reservoir. That large tank is for “looks” mostly.

        • Waco
        • 2 years ago

        Technically you can use a tall res like that to reduce the chances of pumping bubbles through the system – but yes, in general, they’re for appearances only.

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