Cryorig C7 Cu puts a hunk of copper in small spaces

Copper is an excellent material for heatsinks, but its high cost when compared to aluminum means it's sparingly used in heatsinks and other cooling components. Cryorig's C7 Cu CPU cooler capitalizes on the material's higher thermal conductivity to deliver high cooling performance in compact spaces where tower coolers might otherwise not be feasible. The company says the exclusive use of copper in the C7 Cu provides 15% better thermal performance compared to its own standard copper-and-aluminum C7 model.

The heatsink has four 6-mm-wide heatpipes shuttling heat into an array of 57 copper fins. The C7 Cu and its supplied low-profile 92-mm fan measure a scant 1.8" (4.7 cm) tall. The compact dimensions also mean that interference with memory slots should be a non-issue in most applications.

The manufacturer says the slim fan provides up to 40.5 CFM of air flow at its maximum speed of 2500 RPM. The company says the cooler is ready to cool CPUs with TDPs as high as 115 W. A set of rubber isolators separate the fan from the fin array in order to reduce noise and vibration.

The cooler assembly measures 3.8" on each side and weighs 23.8 oz (675 g) including the fan. The C7 Cu fits all Intel LGA 115x, AMD AMx, and AMD FMx sockets except for the teensy-tiny AM1. The retail box includes mounting hardware, thermal paste, and the screwdriver needed for installation. Builders can install the cooler using either the supplied fiberglass-reinforced backing plate or a set of washers.

Cryorig says the C7 Cu CPU cooler will hit shelves in Asia later this month and will storm American shores in late May or early June. The cooler will cost $50 in the US, a substantial uptick from the regular C7's $30 sales price.

Comments closed
    • deruberhanyok
    • 1 year ago

    Have a regular C7 and it’s a great heatsink for the price. Only problem I’ve had with it is that the base is so low and so wide, there are clearance issues if motherboards aren’t 100% in spec with the CPU “keep out” area that Intel/AMD designates.

    Some Haswell-era Gigabyte boards had power chokes right on the edge of it, and they were just barely tall enough to touch the heatsink base on one edge. But it was enough to make it basically useless on a whole series of boards that shared that engineering.

    Anyways, on boards where there aren’t potential clearance problems, highly recommended. Been a big fan of theirs since I discovered the H7 a few years ago.

    • Chrispy_
    • 1 year ago

    Do they include wire clips to allow the use of other fans with that?

    If not, that’s a massive reason to avoid it. Once that original fan is gone, you’re screwed.

      • Shobai
      • 1 year ago

      That’s why everyone has a 3D printer, right?

      • Redocbew
      • 1 year ago

      That’s what zip ties are for.

        • Chrispy_
        • 1 year ago

        Where’s [i<]Duct Tape Dude[/i<] when you need him, huh?

    • Shobai
    • 1 year ago

    I realise that performance per unit volume is what they’re going for, but 5/3rds the cost for a claimed 23/20ths performance is a hard sell otherwise…

    Tangentially related: I was reading an article yesterday saying that, for car radiators at least, you get better performance out of press fit tube-fin joints rather than soldered joints, since the solder is more insulting at the point of contact (which is also the point of maximal heat transfer, obviously). I would guess that the same is true for the joints between heatpipes and fins; I don’t recall the last design I saw that advertised soldered joints, but I do recall it was a feature a while back.

      • Flying Fox
      • 1 year ago

      This isn’t exactly a mainstream/high volume product. The scale is not linear.

      • strangerguy
      • 1 year ago

      Almost all the CPU heat is dumped out by forced convection in virtually every cooling solution where the high heat conductivity of copper as a convection surface matters little anyway…

        • Redocbew
        • 1 year ago

        A conductor has to pull the heat from the CPU before it can be convected away by something else, no?

          • BobbinThreadbare
          • 1 year ago

          It does, but I think the point is that is always going to be more efficient that moving air, so it’s of minor concern.

            • synthtel2
            • 1 year ago

            I wouldn’t be so sure about that; IME the temperature delta between the die and the average of the fin stack is still pretty big, even with soldered IHSes and heatsink designs that should be getting closer than most.

            To the point of the design of heatsinks like this, there’s only so much that can be done for the convection side of things in a given space and noise profile. Denser fin stacks hardly help without also throwing extra air pressure at them (see SPCR for data on that), and nobody really wants to just throw extra air pressure at things like this (outside of server rooms, anyway). On the conduction side, copper fins may make a small difference, but at least it’s a difference that reaches full effectiveness within the same noise profile.

            Copper fins may also be useful in high-noise designs with very dense fin stacks, where they can provide the same internal conductivity as an aluminum fin in a thinner package. This doesn’t look like one of those, though.

    • oldog
    • 1 year ago

    I’d love to see a review of this vs the Thermolab LP53. These look ideal for m-ITX systems.

    • Welch
    • 1 year ago

    Back in the day I used to be a big solid copper heatsink snob. It seemed like the heating needs weren’t really there as things got more efficient and produced less heat. In a small space where heat is a real concern, it’s great to see a solid copper HS. If I had a need in a blade server for instance, this would be something I’d give serious considerations to.

    • AnotherReader
    • 1 year ago

    Looks perfect for a node 202

      • DPete27
      • 1 year ago

      I’m pretty sure the [url=http://www.coolermaster.com/cooling/cpu-air-cooler/geminii-m4/<]CM GeminII M4[/url<] or [url=http://www.scythe-eu.com/en/products/cpu-cooler/big-shuriken-2-rev-b.html<]Scythe Big Surkien 2[/url<] will fit inside the Node 202 and would give you significantly more cooling ability.

        • AnotherReader
        • 1 year ago

        I think they will only fit if the dust filter on the CPU intake is removed.

          • EndlessWaves
          • 1 year ago

          And if it’s that close to the grill they may well cause excessive turbulence (i.e. they’ll be noisy).

            • DPete27
            • 1 year ago

            [url=https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA59T1R00547<]ID Cooling IS-60[/url<] is 55mm tall, which is < the 56mm required in the Node 202 spec.

            • EndlessWaves
            • 1 year ago

            I’d be allowing 5-10mm of open air between the fan and the case if using a top-down ducted fan cooler like that.

            My case takes 48mm coolers and people who tried the 47mm C7 in it reported it was very noisy, Noctua’s L9 at 37mm high was generally agreed to be the optimum solution.

            • DPete27
            • 1 year ago

            Just trying to help. I don’t own a Node 202, But looking at newegg reviews it seems users are pretty happy with the IS-60 in both the Node 202 and the Silverstone ML08.

    • Redocbew
    • 1 year ago

    Nifty. I always liked the aluminum C7. I probably would have bought one of these if it were available at the time.

    Copper is also more difficult to machine than aluminum. It loves to gall up and stick to things.

      • Chrispy_
      • 1 year ago

      Copper conducts better than aluminium, but it doesn’t radiate heat as well, so you want a copper base/heatpipe and alloy fins for optimum efficiency.

      I guess in this rare case, the fins are so small that the conductivity is a more significant part of the equation than the radiation rates.

        • Redocbew
        • 1 year ago

        Convection in general can be thought of as a combination of conduction(heat transfer by direct contact) and advection(heat transfer by fluid flow). Transferring heat by radiation is something different.

        It’s true that pure copper has much lower emissivity than pure aluminum, but radiative heat transfer generally doesn’t play a significant role in the cooling of a PC.

          • Chrispy_
          • 1 year ago

          Convection doesn’t apply to forced airflow though.

          Convection is merely the natural movement of fluid through gravity’s effect on areas of differing density, that density difference being itself caused by local temperature differentials.

          Heatsinks with forced airflow still rely on radiation to transfer heat from the metal to the fluid. forced airflow just improves the rate at which heated air is removed and replaced with cooler air and turbulence is effective at reducing the thickness of the boundary layer of air clinging to the fins.

            • Redocbew
            • 1 year ago

            I don’t want to get hung up on terminology, but I still think you’re confusing “radiation” with other forms of heat transfer. The heat we receive from the sun is transferred by radiation. That’s not the kind of heat transfer we’re talking about here.

            My earlier point was that many people talk about convection(either natural or forced) like it’s a completely separate and distinct form of heat transfer with its own set of properties when really it’s not. The heat that flows from a CPU to a heatsink, and the heat that flows from a heatsink to a surrounding fluid is transferred by the same process. It’s a diffusion of energy across a temperature gradient. When the heat is transferred to the surrounding fluid it affects the density of the fluid which gives rise to bulk fluid movement(advection). Combining those two transport phenomena is what we call convection.

            What that all leads to is that there is no property of a metal which allows it to “absorb” and “give up” its heat at different rates by means of convection.

    • Kretschmer
    • 1 year ago

    I want to buy this just for the lack of RGB LEDs. Maybe my PC needs a hat…

    • Voldenuit
    • 1 year ago

    This would be great in a Taku.

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