Rumor: Crimson Canyon NUC could blend Cannon Lake and Radeon graphics

Intel seems to be bullish about its NUCs. We've recently taken a good look at Intel's Hades Canyon gaming NUC, and now website WinFuture.de got a hold of pictures and specs of what appears to be a prototype "Crimson Canyon" NUC (model name NUC8I3CYSM2) packing an as-yet-unlisted Intel Core i3-8121U CPU. That chip is rumored to be a 10-nm unit based on the company's upcoming Cannon Lake architecture. Perhaps more surprisingly, though, that NUC apparently carries an as-yet-unannounced Radeon 550 graphics chip onboard.

Source: WinFuture.de

Previous rumors pinned the Core i3-8121U chip as having two cores, Hyper-Threading support, and a 2.2 GHz clock. However, WinFuture claims the chip apparently with no Turbo Boost support. Meanwhile, the purported Radeon 550 has 2 GB of its own VRAM and looks to be clocked at 1124 MHz. WinFuture says the machine comes with a 90-W power supply. That would make sense in light of the added power draw from the onboard Radeon. Meanwhile, Twitter user @TUM_APISAK posted a 3DMark 11 database listing displaying exactly the combination of hardware present in the purported NUC. That entry shows the motherboard to be a NUC8i3CYB variant. There are several entries for the Core i3-8121U in the Geekbench database, too, but they all come from Lenovo systems.

Source: WinFuture.de

According to WinFuture, some e-tailers are already listing two variations of the Crimson Canyon NUC, the NUC8I3CYSM2 and NUC8I3CYSM3, for around 450€, or around $458 without VAT. It's not immediately clear what the difference is between both models. We found them listed at online store Redcorp, and they're both specced with the Core i3-8128U CPU, 8 GB of RAM, and a 1-TB hard drive. Whatever the deal is, our guess is that it won't be long before these machines are out and about.

Comments closed
    • NovusBogus
    • 2 years ago

    An i3 with real graphics that, if those links are accurate, would likely have a barebones price of around $300? To that I say, OH HELL YES. This is exactly the configuration I’ve been waiting to see. A legitimate desktop replacement capable of a broad chunk of the general purpose workload that x86 is known for, including gaming, to truly showcase what SFF is capable of. The i5/i7 NUCs never made a whole lot of sense, especially the decision to only put Iris in the most expensive flagship model. But an i3 that’s not quite as fast but offers a much more balanced experience is perfect.

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 2 years ago

      Is the experience really so much more “balanced” with a dual core and a bit more GPU, than Ryzen 2x00G?

    • hubick
    • 2 years ago

    Can we please get one which can be connected to, and powered by, a Thunderbolt dock. USB-C PD allows for up to 100 watts, so that should be viable for a device like this.

    Also, I’d like to see them update their Compute Stick models for that as well.

    • WhatMeWorry
    • 2 years ago

    I want something like a 2-core 28 CU device.

      • willmore
      • 2 years ago

      You wouldn’t want that for mining would you?

        • WhatMeWorry
        • 2 years ago

        Nope.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 2 years ago

    Radeon 550 could just be shorthand for the Radeon RX 550, perhaps? That part a particularly potent performer. It’s [url=https://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?N=100007709%20601296396&IsNodeId=1&Submit=ENE<]definitely an announced part, though[/url<]. @TUM_APISAK's link even mentions RX 550 in the result: [url<]https://www.3dmark.com/3dm11/12593662[/url<]

    • Hattig
    • 2 years ago

    The interesting thing is what this means for Intel’s 10nm, and yields.

    Because this is a dual-core, without a GPU. Intel doesn’t make CPUs without a GPU, and I believe that the specification of this small, low-end die should be 2 CPU and 2 GPU cores.

    Yet it appears (and other recent rumours support this) that Intel has enough 10nm dies coming back with duff GPUs that its worth them repackaging the CPUs with discrete GPUs.

      • DancinJack
      • 2 years ago

      Why do you think it doesn’t have a GPU?

        • NTMBK
        • 2 years ago

        There’s been plenty of rumours/leaks about Cannonlake being “2+0”: [url<]https://www.tomshardware.co.uk/intel-docs-dual-core-cannon-lake-10nm,news-57888.html[/url<] As in, 2 cores and the GPU is disabled/not functional.

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      There is a GPU but some SKUs don’t turn it on.
      As to why it isn’t turned on, that could be due to yields or market segmentation since Intel may want to push stronger graphics in NUCs and AMD is happy to move the silicon to do it.

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 2 years ago

        If this is a low-end part, isn’t AMD competing with their own APU here? Cause dual cores sounds like a pretty low end part, ever since AMD made quad the standard at all price points.

          • NoOne ButMe
          • 2 years ago

          But the form factor, I don’t think anyone offers anything in the form factor for AMD.

          And presumably the form factor is what would drive people to this.

          Ideally AMD would make their own NUC, but lack the resources to do so.

          So the sales this actually “takes” from AMD is probably about nil. Certainly less than the (low) profit they will get from selling dGPUs to Intel.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 2 years ago

      7980xe doesn’t have a GPU.

    • deruberhanyok
    • 2 years ago

    The idea of a NUC with a more capable (even if it’s low-end) graphics solution is appealing, but the price of these things is getting a bit high. They’re approaching Apple territory.

    Speaking of which, this could also be a future Mac Mini platform update. Although at this point it’s probably easier to just buy a NUC and try to run OSX on it.

    Could be some decent OpenCL benefit from the RX 550 (geekbench opencl scores there seem to be around 50,000, compared to some Intel 630 scores at around 22,000) but since it’s a low power platform I don’t know that it’s really enough to matter.

    Nice for emulators though!

      • DPete27
      • 2 years ago

      So you’re saying it’s ok as long as the same hardware comes with Apple OS and not Windows?

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        Yes. Apple people are used to be ripped off and bled dry. That’s normal for them

        Windows users don’t expect to be ripped off and bled dry because there’s lots of competition in the market to prevent any one company from getting too greedy.

          • tay
          • 2 years ago

          This is probably false

          • Voldenuit
          • 2 years ago

          The corollary is that there’s always another Mac user you can sell your old stuff to for literally more money than it’s worth when you upgrade.

          A used Windows system, on the other hand, has the resale value of a vintage taco.

            • Bauxite
            • 2 years ago

            The cult always welcomes new members, but hotel california rules.

        • deruberhanyok
        • 2 years ago

        Sort of. I’m saying the high price is [b<]expected[/b<] if it's Apple. I don't think that makes it OK, though. To have Intel charging Apple prices for a system that still needs memory, storage and an OS is getting a bit ridiculous. I mean, they're Intel, not Apple. Intel is positioning themselves as a premium brand with these prices and the systems aren't even usable out of the box. It's weird.

      • NTMBK
      • 2 years ago

      [quote<]The idea of a NUC with a more capable (even if it's low-end) graphics solution is appealing, but the price of these things is getting a bit high. They're approaching Apple territory. Speaking of which, this could also be a future Mac Mini platform update. Although at this point it's probably easier to just buy a NUC and try to run OSX on it. [/quote<] The RX 550 has fewer shaders than the integrated graphics in Raven Ridge... I'd rather see a Mac Mini using Raven Ridge.

        • deruberhanyok
        • 2 years ago

        That would be really neat! I think the RX 550 is 10-20% faster than a 2400G (at least 3dmark fire strike scores seem to indicate that) but it’s tough to beat the overall performance/power of the Ryzen APUs.

        I’d really like to see a Ryzen APU, with Vega, and 1 or 2GB of HBM integrated somehow. Maybe for Zen2.

        • MOSFET
        • 2 years ago

        Yeah, NUC with Raven Ridge is probably not in the cards.

          • Anonymous Coward
          • 2 years ago

          I’d think some ambitious company would make such a product, how card can it be?

      • NoOne ButMe
      • 2 years ago

      Eh, $460 dollars with those specs. So probably like 275 barebones. 250 if we’re lucky, 300 if unlucky.

      You’re looking at Apple being about 50%, or about 100% more expensive faster depending if you go HDD or SSD.

      Dunno why you think that’s approaching Apple territory.

        • deruberhanyok
        • 2 years ago

        you’re right, I missed that part. A lot of the preconfigured i3 NUC systems on, for instance, Newegg, have prices of $700+. I figured this was going to wind up in the same ballpark.

          • NoOne ButMe
          • 2 years ago

          I guess it could, but “worst case” it’s $550 or so. assuming the retailers go for the same margins as the European ones are.

    • Voldenuit
    • 2 years ago

    ‘Radeon 500’… so, we’re saying Polaris?

    Because it sounds like they’re saying Polaris.

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      It’s not REALLY Polaris just like Kaby Lake G is not REALLY Vega.

      We’re not making this easy on ANYBODY!

      • NoOne ButMe
      • 2 years ago

      Yes.

      The smallest of the two/three/four pieces of Vega silicon is not a dGPU.

      So it would be Polaris.

      2/3/4 because….
      Vega 10 (2 HBM2 stacks Vega)
      Vega 11 (Raven Ridge)
      ‘Vega’ used in Intel’s CPU combo (which is probably Polaris with HBM2)
      Vega Mobile (which might be the ‘vega’ card used in Intel’s CPU combo?)

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