Philips Momentum 43 pairs DisplayHDR 1000 certification with Ambilight

A 43" display stretches the definition of "computer monitor" a bit, but gamers and media consumers can certainly make a case for such a sizable screen. That's especially true if the monitor uses a 3840×2160 MVA panel with a typical contrast ratio of 4000:1 and a maximum brightness of 1000 cd/m², like Philips' upcoming Momentum 43 display, model number 436M6VBPAB (PDF).

That brightness value isn't just for show. Philips says that the Momentum 43 will be able to sustain 720 cd/m² for continuous bright scenes. The company also says that the upcoming display will support 10-bit color input and should be able to reproduce 97.6% of the DCI-P3 color space. This is not only an HDR display, but in fact an HDR display bearing the rarefied DisplayHDR 1000 certification. This is the first such monitor we've seen, although we have talked about other displays in the past that could equally qualify if their creators sought that certification.

The rest of the specs on the Momentum 43 are about what you'd expect: a 60-Hz refresh rate, 4-ms gray-to-gray response time, and 178º all-ways viewing angles. The Momentum 43 has support for Philips Adaptive Sync tech, which we take to mean VESA Adaptive Sync, more commonly known as FreeSync. Philips doesn't make it clear what the refresh rate range is, though.

If having the first DisplayHDR 1000 certification isn't enough to sell you on the Momentum 43, the monitor also includes Philips' Ambiglow technology. If you haven't seen it before, Ambiglow automatically projects suitable mood lighting to match the images on-screen using LEDs in the exterior casing of the display. It sounds like a gimmick until you see it in action, as it really does improve the feeling of immersion while gaming or watching a movie.

The Momentum 43 will come with HDMI 2.0, DisplayPort 1.2, mini-DisplayPort 1.2, and USB Type-C connections. The USB Type-C connection can be used for video as well as enabling the USB 3.0 hub on the display. Philips says the USB 3.0 ports support fast charging, but declined to list their power output. The company does put down the monitor for a 162-W typical power draw. We suppose blasting 1000 cd/m² across a 43" diagonal takes some juice.

If you're chomping at the bit for one of the HDR-est displays we've ever seen, you should settle in for a little wait, as Philips has yet to make an announcement regarding when the Momentum 43 will be available. The company also hasn't revealed pricing, though judging by the specs, you'd do best to prepare for a bit of sticker shock. Thanks to OC3D for the tip.

Comments closed
    • NoOne ButMe
    • 2 years ago

    Arstechnica is claiming $1000…
    Now i’m Hoping for a 500-750 dollar smaller (closer to 30”) at 1440p.

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    Just curious. How often do people usually replace their monitors? I’ve been using my LG W2252TQ 22″ LCD for 9 years now and as long as it’s working I don’t plan to ditch it.

      • jts888
      • 2 years ago

      My progression:
      [list<][*<]2001: + Iiyama VisionMaster Pro 510 (20" viewable flat Trinitron 4:3 CRT) [/*<][*<]2003: + Samsung LCD (20" 1600x1200 VA) [/*<][*<]2004: + another Samsung LCD (20" 1600x1200 VA) [/*<][*<]2008: + HP LP3065 (30" 2560x1600 IPS), -CRT (demoted from main use, still have it in a closet) [/*<][*<]2015: + LG 49UF7600 TV (49" UHD IPS), - 30" (sold to friend), - 2*20" VAs (donated to Salvation Army or Goodwill) [/*<][*<]2017: + LG 43UD79-B (43" UHD IPS), -TV (now used as actual TV)[/*<][/list<] I will upgrade again when 40"+ UHD IPS monitors with 120+Hz sell for under $1k, and likely again when 8k 40"+ comes out. (Tokyo summer Olympics, I'm looking at you for trickle-down 8k to monitors by 2022.)

    • Kretschmer
    • 2 years ago

    As high refresh rates and HDR backlighting intersect, will we run into limitations on the backlight switching speed?

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    Another terrific brand. [b<]MOMENTUM 43[/b<]. How about calling it Cheeseball 43? /smirk

      • Redocbew
      • 2 years ago

      They missed it by one.

      If it were Momentum 42 it’d be the answer to everything.

        • willmore
        • 2 years ago

        Naw, 43 is cooler because it’s the solution to the Chicken McNuggets Problem.

    • gerryg
    • 2 years ago

    I find this intriguing. Once it can do at least 75Hz adaptive sync, it will be more so. Sigh. Time to ask the boss for another raise.

    • JosiahBradley
    • 2 years ago

    Some sites are reporting this is in fact an 8bit monitor that simply supports a 10bit input making it not HDR at all.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 2 years ago

      That’s… not … how that works.

      To begin with, this monitor—like the majority of “10-bit” displays including my LG 24UD58—does use an 8-bit panel to produce 10-bit images. It does this the same way most TN panels (which only have 6 bits per color of color precision) reproduce 8-bit images: using Frame Rate Control. True 10-bit displays are becoming more common, but still fairly rare outside of professional photo-editing monitors.

      More to the point, though, HDR has to do with brightness, contrast, and color gamut more than color depth. Having greater precision in your color data (10-bits per color = more shades reproducible) can give you the ability to more accurately reproduce shades, it doesn’t necessarily increase the breadth of shades you can reproduce.

      In general, most LCDs these days don’t have a problem getting to the primaries (most saturated shades) of common colorspaces, like Rec.709. Adding more colors just improves the precision. Your real issue with “HDR” is contrast. LCDs, and particularly IPS LCDs, are not good at actually blocking out the backlight. This is why you need local dimming to achieve any sort of reasonable “HDR” quality on an LCD.

      This specific display has a very powerful backlight, local dimming, and a high-quality MVA panel. Not only that, but it’s VESA-certified at the highest level of HDR certification they offer. If you want to tell VESA that this display doesn’t qualify for DisplayHDR 1000 because it doesn’t use a 10-bit panel, be my guest. 🙂

      As far as I know, there are no 10-bit VA panels.

        • JosiahBradley
        • 2 years ago

        Well Vesa’s requirements are less than that of UHDA which requires the device to be at 10 bit. My personal HDR TV has a certified 10bit VA panel and it looks amazing using Dolby Vision:

        [url<]https://www.displayspecifications.com/en/model/3f3fb8a[/url<]

          • DancinJack
          • 2 years ago

          While you are right about the panel, at least from what I have read on the internet, i’m not sure what UHDA’s requirements have to do with it. I think there is still a lack of understanding in how all this tech works.

          • RAGEPRO
          • 2 years ago

          Check the PDF. The Momentum 43 is UHDA certified.

            • JosiahBradley
            • 2 years ago

            I guess I stand corrected. Just confusing why there isn’t a solid this is what is needed for the standard and the competing formats etc. All I know is the HDR I’ve experienced with my TV and I like it but I don’t want to accidentally downgrade when getting a monitor. Just want a way to easily compare the feature set.

    • Voldenuit
    • 2 years ago

    60 Hz? What’s the point of having HDR if you have to put up with brain-hurting 3:2 pulldown judder in everything you watch?

      • brucethemoose
      • 2 years ago

      Alot of TVs do native 24hz input.

      That doesn’t work for desktop rendering though, which the TV manufacturers don’t really care about. Meanwhile, the monitor ones use 120hz or VRR as a massive markup because it’s a “gaming” feature, and the video players most people use (the Netflix app and browser stuff) don’t support VRR anyway.

      But I agree. 120hz or VRR should be part of the HDR standard, IMO.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    Another way to simulate 720 cd/m² for continuous bright scenes is to go outside and stare directly at the sun until you go blind.

    I mean, if you’re trying to use your monitor outdoors, in direct sunlight then I guess it could be useful; Otherwise anything over about 400cd/m² is just [i<]painful.[/i<]

    • DPete27
    • 2 years ago

    I think more manufacturers should include Ambilight on/in their TVs. Heck, with all the RGB madness in the computer space, I’m surprised it hasn’t permeated faster.

      • Waco
      • 2 years ago

      This. It’s an extremely awesome feature if integrated properly.

        • demani
        • 2 years ago

        what TVs offer it? I’d be game for a reasonable quality TV with it.

          • DPete27
          • 2 years ago

          Philips is the only manufacturer that does this IIRC.
          Obviously “Ambilight” is TM’d by them, maybe they patented the bejeezus out of it also and nobody can get in?

          • Waco
          • 2 years ago

          Only Phillips has them, and they have a pretty painfully thin selection.

          They could license it and make a TON of money, I don’t know why they don’t. It’s one of the best uses of this whole RGB-everything craze since it actually adds to your game/movie experience IMO.

      • Eversor
      • 2 years ago

      Two side ambilight is kind of meh but four sides looks awesome. Either way it can help reduce eye fatigue in bad light conditions – I have done this with a white lamp to great effect.

      • tay
      • 2 years ago

      It’s patented by Philips. I agree, I like the feature a lot.

    • Usacomp2k3
    • 2 years ago

    I thought Adaptive Synce <> (or != depending on your language of choice) freesync?

      • tay
      • 2 years ago

      FreeSync still needs some AMD certification. Adaptive Sync doesn’t. Otherwise they will work interchangeably as far as I’ve seen.

    • EndlessWaves
    • 2 years ago

    Well, the intent of the DisplayHDR 1000 spec didn’t even survive the first monitor to bear it’s name.

    HDR1000 Screens are supposed to be able to display 600cd/m² boxes in the corner of a 0.05cd/m² screen. Or 12,000:1 contrast.

    4000:1 contrast is a long way short of that, and no more than existing 43″ displays.

    So why has this passed? The standard specifies that although the screen is asked to produce a 600cd/m² signal, it’s not actually required to check that is what is being output.

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      It’ll manage on the local backlight dimming, since backlight off = 0.00cd/m² and 720cd/m² is INFINTY:1 contrast ratio.

      HDR1000 isn’t a static contrast spec, it’s a dynamic contrast spec, and manufacturers have been using 100000000000000000000000000000:1 hyper-inflated contrast ratios for a decade already.

    • willmore
    • 2 years ago

    Reading this article, it struck me that Ambilight is basically adaptive backlight (local dimming) but just aimed at the wall behind the display.

      • hechacker1
      • 2 years ago

      Ambilight is only for ambient lighting as you said. I don’t see anywhere in the specs that it mentions local dimming.

      I’m assuming that to get HDR certification, they’ll at least have to do global dimming.

      • DancinJack
      • 2 years ago

      Has nothing to do with adaptive backlighting. It’s an ambient light feature that the TV spurts out the sides/top/bottom depending on the model and what is on the screen (and your settings).

      [url<]https://www.philips.co.uk/c-m-so/televisions/p/ambilight[/url<] edit: Spelling

    • setaG_lliB
    • 2 years ago

    My 64″ F8500 laughs at that display’s miniscule power draw.
    I’ve seen this thing peak at around 630w displaying 3D blu-ray content. Take that, Earth.

      • freebird
      • 2 years ago

      For your monitor…
      [url<]https://youtu.be/JfUM5xHUY4M[/url<]

      • Jigar
      • 2 years ago

      I think 2 birds died reading your comment. 🙁

      • Kretschmer
      • 2 years ago

      Hey, what’s the Earth worth when deep dark blacks are at stake?

    • jts888
    • 2 years ago

    Can someone just let me know when UHD@120Hz (DP 1.3/1.4) displays will finally come out?
    If you asked me what features I though my current monitors were lacking, I doubt ambient lighting would have made the top 20 list.

      • Eversor
      • 2 years ago

      I had an interesting experience last week.

      Bought a new VA TV, which despite being the same 60Hz as my old IPS, didn’t seem as smooth while in racing games. Seems the older IPS screen has an amount of motion blur that gives the impression of an higher frame rate, which was clearly visible when seeing very fast moving objects being blurred vs not on the VA screen – like say passing by billboards at 200kph.
      So I had noticed an 85Hz CRT was much smoother than 60Hz LCD but had not noticed pixel persistence could contribute to smoother motion.
      Guess if it’s not terribly bad persistence, it is a natural form of frame interpolation and I rather prefer it than not.

      This puts one in a position where IPS looked butter smooth at 60Hz but on the VA screen one probably wants 120Hz+. I guess a very competitive FPS player wants no blur and the lowest latency possible, but otherwise I’m starting to think it may be possible to use some amount of persistence as free motion smoothing.

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        If you don’t have a strobing backlight, the ideal pixel response time is actually EXACTLY half of the frame time, which for a 60Hz panel is 8.3ms.

        IPS televisions would probably be ~7ms G2G average.
        VA televisions would be ~4ms median (with some bad 20ms transitions at the very dark end of the scale driving the G2G average up to around 6-7ms)

          • Eversor
          • 2 years ago

          Mine is very old now, 12 years I think. So it’s probably being over 10ms that gives it this effect?

          That latency you refer is to not have blur?

          It was not noticeable most of the time but switching between screens, the older one was a bit smoother. Until I noticed passing objects having significantly more blur vs not, I couldn’t really pin point what was going on but had noticed objects passing me seemed somewhat more fluid.

          Well, maybe the VA panel had some blur reduction that couldn’t be controlled. From reviews I saw, Samsung VA TVs let you control the amount of blur with “Black Frame Insertion”.

            • Chrispy_
            • 2 years ago

            If I can find the article I’ll link it, but the basic premise was that to combat the “sample and hold” blur you’d get on a hypothetical 0ms panel, there are two options:

            1) Strobe the image so that your brain perceives fluid motion with crisp detail
            2) Fade the image in and out to provide pseudo-blur that syncs the fade period with the refresh.

            For option 2 you’re going to get some ghosting but half a frame duration is the theoretical best compromise between “sample and hold” blur at zero response time, and “double-image ghosting” at 1 frame of response time.

      • Kretschmer
      • 2 years ago

      27″ displays are slated for Q3 this year. But the GPUs to run 4K@120Hz are probably a few years out.

      I’d much rather see better 1440P panels.

        • jts888
        • 2 years ago

        A GPU capable of “running” UHD@120Hz is subject purely to the workload, and even things as simple as desktop cursor/window movement and scrolling all can look a lot nicer with a fps boost.

        My primary monitor at the moment is a 43″ UHD, and honestly I restrict a lot of what limited gaming I do to windowed 2560×1600/1440 just to keep the physical FOV manageable, so UHD@120Hz would suit me perfectly with[i<]out[/i<] ([b<]edit[/b<]) some 2020-era GPU.

          • Kretschmer
          • 2 years ago

          That’s fair, but it seems a bit expensive to pay $2-3K for a 144Hz/4K monitor when you could slap a 27″ fast IPS on your desk for gaming at a fraction of the cost. Throw in a few hundred for monitor arms to swap desk positions and you’d be set.

            • jts888
            • 2 years ago

            Maybe I’m naive, but I am hoping the prices are way below that on Adaptive-sync models. (or at least non-G-sync taxed ones) My LG 43UD79-B (43″ IPS) was less than $600, and 120 Hz IPS panels have already been in TVs for years.

            My primary use case isn’t gaming but working with text though, so a full-sized display with a lot of vertical space and no bezels suits me better, which is why I didnt already go the fast 1440p route.

            • Kretschmer
            • 2 years ago

            Oh, I was suggesting a fast 1440P display in addition to your current large model.

            • jts888
            • 2 years ago

            Ah, gotcha. I am desk space constrained at the moment though.

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