Dell celebrates 25 years of OptiPlex with an all-new lineup

Dell's been selling business-oriented desktops under the OptiPlex name for 25 years. To celebrate, the company is replacing the entire line with new offerings. The refreshed gear includes four new all-in-one machines alongside a whole fleet of mini-tower, SFF, and micro-desktops. There's also a new OptiPlex XE3 ruggedized desktop. There's a lot of ground to cover, but let's take a quick peek at the new OptiPlex lineup.

Starting with the standard desktops, we have the 7060 series, the 5060 series, and the 3060 series. All three families's desktops come in three form factors: mini-tower, small-form-factor (SFF) desktop, and micro-desktop. The machines all more or less look identical save for size, and they have CPU options ranging from Pentium Gold chips on up to the Core i7-8700. All machines have storage options up to SSD-and-HDD setups. As you move up the product stack, the differences are primarily in the graphics and memory options.

Dell OptiPlex 5060 micro-desktop

The 3060 series machines use the Intel H370 chipset and are limited to 32 GB of RAM and low-end discrete graphics, topping out at AMD's Radeon RX 550. The 5060 and the 7060 OptiPlexes support 64 GB of RAM and dual graphics cards, although the micro-desktop versions of these machines are limited to 32 GB of RAM and a single discrete graphics unit. Those series are also based on the Q370 chipset, allowing for additional remote management and security options not found on the 3060s.

Dell OptiPlex XE3 mini-tower and SFF

The Optiplex XE3 is very similar to the OptiPlex 7060 series, and in fact it looks identical externally. The X3s only come as mini-tower and SFF models, though. Dell doesn't go into great detail about exactly how these machines are more rugged than their cousins, but does say that they have more aggressive active cooling and optional dust filters. The company recommends these machines for medical, industrial, retail, and marine applications.

Dell OptiPlex 7760 all-in-one

If a monitor-mounted micro-desktop is still too big—or if you just really hate wires—then the OptiPlex all-in-one (AIO) machines will be your jam. There are four new models: the 27" OptiPlex 7760, the 23.8" OptiPlex 7460, the 21.5" OptiPlex 5260, and the 19.5" OptiPlex 3050. Dell's press materials don't include the specifications for the little OptiPlex 3050, but the other three machines share most of their specs with the new OptiPlex desktops. That means CPUs up to the Core i7-8700, a pair of 16-GB DDR4 DIMMs, and a GeForce GTX 1050 at the maximum.

Dell OptiPlex 5260 all-in-one

The displays on all three AIOs are 1920×1080 IPS screens, although the 7760 has a 3840×2160 panel available. All three models can be equipped with capacitive touch as an option on their 1920×1080 displays. As with the desktops, Dell offers dual storage (SSD plus hard drive) options including 1-TB M.2 PCIe SSDs. Alternatively you can set them up with Optane Memory caching.

All of this new hardware will be available on Dell's website starting May 22. The all-in-one machines will begin at $869 for the OptiPlex 5260, $1069 for the 7460, and $1229 for the 7760. The updated OptiPlex desktops will start at $499 for the 3060 SFF model and go up from there. Finally, the ruggedized OptiPlex XE3 will start at $649.

Comments closed
    • JosiahBradley
    • 2 years ago

    I see Dell is still pushing Intel. Or is it Intel who pushes Dell?

      • barich
      • 2 years ago

      Dell has AMD offerings too. Business-class models tend to feature Intel more often, though. Mostly because of the “nobody ever got fired for buying [s<]IBM[/s<] Intel" mindset, I suspect, but up until very recently AMD had nothing performance competitive either.

        • ronch
        • 2 years ago

        I think it’s not just the performance or efficiency of AMD chips themselves, it’s guaranteed supply as well. With a million fabs under its control Intel can guarantee a steady supply of chipperies. If you’re planning production of a certain line of computers (or anything else) you usually stick with suppliers that can better guarantee supply. I’m not saying AMD can’t supply but AMD has had several supply constraints before, some maybe controversial (which involved Dell). They don’t have complete control of their fabs either, and GF also has far less capacity than Intel and AMD only gets a portion of that capacity.

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      This is a deep philosophical question whose only rational answer is THANK YOU AMD!

        • ronch
        • 2 years ago

        Deep philosophical question… CONFIRMED!!!

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 2 years ago

      Oh come on, they’ve had solid AMD offerings in the Ryzen era. The Inspiron 27 7000 (a big AIO) has been on the market for quite some time, its AMD Ryzen and Radeon. (I almost bought one just last week, but opted instead for non-AIO.)

      Now… that said… I note they have removed their AMD gaming PC in my home market here, but for most of the Ryzen v1 era, AMD was the basis for their lower-end (but seemingly fine) gaming PC, at least here.

      They’ve had the big AMD AIO on sale the past weeks (12% discount now), I’m interested to see if they replace it soon, and with what.

    • barich
    • 2 years ago

    I bought 10 refurbished OptiPlex 9010s about a year ago.

    The power supply has failed in four out of those 10 so far.

    Meanwhile, of the 9-year-old Acers I replaced with these, one had a non-original power supply.

    Anedotes and all, but I expect a business-class desktop PC to last until it’s useless.

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      Yep, as per my post below, regret was caused by the cheap PSUs, cheap cooling fans, and barebones-basic motherboard with minimal upgrade headroom.

      • shess
      • 2 years ago

      Dude, you’re getting a Dell!

      • ronch
      • 2 years ago

      Well, if it breaks, then it becomes useless, then it won’t last anymore.

        • barich
        • 2 years ago

        Touché. Perhaps “obsolete” would have been a better word.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    The only time we ever bought Optiplex we regretted not getting Precisions instead.

    They were a bit cheaper to buy, but their build quality compromises weren’t even remotely worth the savings.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This