Adata XPG Spectrix D80 RAM shines RGB LEDs through a liquid cooler

Shout out to my boy Andy who wants to liquid-cool everything in his system. Adata's got just the RAM for him: the XPG Spectrix D80 series. These memory modules have RGB LED lighting, but that's not the most unusual thing about them. As you could guess, they use a form of liquid cooling. The Spectrix D80 appears to be the shipping version of the company's "Jellyfish" project shown at CES 2018.

Adata calls the heatsink on the Spectrix D80s a "hybrid liquid-air cooling" system. We're not sure how effective the liquid is for cooling, since it doesn't connect to any radiators and appears to be contained entirely in a tube on top of the DIMMs. Adata says the non-conductive fluid inside has a low boiling point. It probably looks pretty cool, anyway.

The company says that overclockers can take this RAM to 5000 MT/s transfer rates. The fact that Adata claims to have achieved that earlier this month with its Spectrix D41 modules casts a little doubt on the practical efficacy of the D80's cooling solution, but it certainly can't hurt. You can control the sticks' RGB LEDs using motherboard lighting control utilities from every major brand.

To begin with, these sticks will show up in kits of two or four 8-GB modules. A two-module 16-GB 2666 MT/s kit will run you about $200, and a four-stick 32-GB 2666 MT/s kit should be around $400. Faster 3000 MT/s RAM will run you $210 for a 16-GB dual-channel kit and $420 for 32 GB spread across four 8-GB modules. Later this year, the company intends to bring out even faster modules at speeds up to 5000 MT/s.

Comments closed
    • TwistedKestrel
    • 1 year ago

    Not any less effective than any other heatsinks on DDR4

    • cynan
    • 1 year ago

    You guys have it all wrong. The mini passive radiators atop the liquid tube reservoirs are only visible when the RGB LEDs are set to psychedelic-neon.

    • ronch
    • 1 year ago

    When will Intel and AMD realize that they need to put cool LED lighting on their CPUs too? Hey Intel and AMD, allocate some R&D money for this, yo.

    • Waco
    • 1 year ago

    I guess if it boils when it gets hot it could look cool, but there’s no way that liquid in a tube across the top helps cooling at all.

      • dragontamer5788
      • 1 year ago

      I think the primary purpose of this is branding.

      If these sticks can consistently achieve a high-overclock, then the “liquid” achieves its purpose. Its a differentiator in the marketplace, and an easy way for enthusiasts to tell each other which stick of RAM actually overclocks well.

        • Waco
        • 1 year ago

        I really, [i<]really[/i<], hate SKUs that exist solely for branding. 🙁

          • dragontamer5788
          • 1 year ago

          I dunno.

          I’m not personally into the super-overclocking thing. But so many people want “Samsung B-dies”, and its relatively difficult to find. There are tricks, like “3200 MT/s CL14” which usually result in Samsung B-dies, but for some reason the companies don’t guarantee that.

          This “Adata XPG d80” is [b<]guaranteed[/b<] to be Samsung B-die, in fact it looks like they're well-binned B-dies as well. That's important.

            • Waco
            • 1 year ago

            Oh I don’t disagree with useful model numbers that denote particular parts – I disagree with the branding aspect. 😛

    • dragontamer5788
    • 1 year ago

    Considering that the original design had the fluid all over the chips, the original design was almost certainly [url=http://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/64892O/fluorinert-electronic-liquid-fc-72.pdf<]Florinert[/url<]. Florinert has a low-boiling point, is completely non-conductive, and is expensive as all hell. (Rumors are ~$100 per liter) And cost is probably where Adata ran into issues. When we look at this new design, the liquid is no longer touching the chips. Which means that Adata can use a much cheaper fluid, such as Ethanol / Alcohol. That'd have much lower boiling point than water but the downside is that it needs to be fully isolated from the electronics. This newer design seems to focus more on the wow-factor. The liquid certainly makes a distinctive look, but I don't think it has the same cooling properties as the original Florinert prototype. This is basically just a liquid heat-reservoir poorly connected to the top of a heatsink. The aluminum heatsink is the thing that would primarily be radiating the heat. The primary purpose of the liquid is to absorb more heat, kind of like a capacitor or maybe a "heat battery" if you will.

      • Ifalna
      • 1 year ago

      It’s purely design.
      A “heat battery” is not what you want, because once it is up to temperature, you have a more difficult time dissipating the heat because now you have a second source in the vicinity.

    • drfish
    • 1 year ago

    Move over Biceps Eagle, there’s a new sheriff in town and his name is [url=https://1drv.ms/u/s!AkN6HyWdN54tkYJR7aHedblByRrnNQ<]Shurichicken[/url<].

      • Chrispy_
      • 1 year ago

      OneDrive is so awful.

      I had two redirects and loaded a complete interactive Microsoft portal interface in the interim just to get that image loaded. I can’t imagine clicking that on a phone or Bay-trail netbook!

        • Usacomp2k3
        • 1 year ago

        Loaded almost instantly for me *shrug*

        • drfish
        • 1 year ago

        Sorry! I’d use my normal dr_fish.speedymail.org link but the comments hate links with underscores. 🙁

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 1 year ago

        It seemed to load up fine with Safari.

        • K-L-Waster
        • 1 year ago

        Loaded in about 4 seconds with no hiccups in Chrome for me…

      • ozzuneoj
      • 1 year ago

      Cannot unsee… don’t necessarily want to… its better than the Fist Pumping Eagle…

    • mvp324
    • 1 year ago

    Must not go to the light, must resist.

    • Chrispy_
    • 1 year ago

    I can’t even.
    Where’s my avocado toast?

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