Velocity Micro ProMagix HD150 is an Epyc workstation

It wasn't long ago at all that a 16-core workstation was unthinkable, much less affordable. Now, thanks to AMD's Threadripper CPUs, you can build such a machine relatively cheaply. What if 16 cores and 64 lanes of PCI Express 3.0 aren't enough, though? In that case, you need to go Epyc. While normally intended for server deployments, Epyc makes for a beastly workstation CPU. Velocity Micro is offering just such a machine with its ProMagix HD150 desktop workstation.

If you know anything about Epyc, you probably can guess what sort of class the ProMagix HD150 sits in. Processor options range from the eight-core Epyc 7251 all the way up to the mighty 32-core Epyc 7601. Velocity Micro will shove in up to 256 GB of quad- or octa-channel DDR4 memory running at 2666 MT/s. Storage options range from a single measly 1-TB hard drive all the way up to a combo setup with a Samsung 960 EVO SSD, a pair of 2-TB Crucial MX500 SSDs, and a pair of 8-TB HDDs. Oddly, there are no options for Optane memory or more exotic storage.

The graphics choices that Velocity Micro offers are truly insane. If you just want the CPU power, you can simply outfit your workstation with a basic Radeon Pro WX2100. Going all the way to the other end of the scale, you can equip your ProMagix HD150 with a pair of Vega 10-based Radeon Pro SSG cards, each with their own 1 TB of flash memory onboard. Alternatively, you can choose a 24-GB Quadro P6000 as the primary graphics adapter. Regardless of what you choose, you can also opt to install a Quadro GP100 alongside.

I've barely scratched the surface of the configurable choices on the ProMagix HD150. Judging from the options on offer and the SuperMicro H11SSL-i motherboard in use, it looks like users will have a bit of room for expansion even beyond the richest configuration that Velocity Micro offers. We've contacted the company and been informed that buyers are free to upgrade the workstation themselves, too. The most basic configuration for the ProMagix HD150 starts at $3299, and you can go configure one now at Velocity Micro's website.

Comments closed
    • Chrispy_
    • 1 year ago

    I don’t know why they’re offering an Epyc 7601 when there is no dual-socket board option.

    Like, an extra $3000 just for 200MHz. What am I missing?

    • Hinton
    • 1 year ago

    Since when does Optane memory work with anything but 8th gen Intel CPUs?

      • chuckula
      • 1 year ago

      Le Sigh… since always.

      [url<]https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=intel-optane-900p&num=1[/url<] [quote<]The Intel 900P SSD U.2 280GB NVMe SSD was being tested with the TYAN Transport SX TN70A-B8026 equipped with an AMD EPYC 7601, what a lightning combination of storage and processor power.[/quote<]

        • dodozoid
        • 1 year ago

        I wonder, does it work with radeon SSG?

    • the
    • 1 year ago

    But is it level 21 or higher?

      • chuckula
      • 1 year ago

      It’s currently capped at 32, but the upcoming expansion pack promises to up that to 64.

    • Neutronbeam
    • 1 year ago

    Like, Epyc post dude!

    • chuckula
    • 1 year ago

    I dub thee [url=https://tinyurl.com/mvnht97<]Gilgamesh[/url<]! [man, my URL skills are broken today [fixed]]

    • brucethemoose
    • 1 year ago

    It’s a shame 1P EPYC chips are multiplier locked. Even Intel used to unlock their 1P Xeons (though I’m not sure if they still do).

    Also, you have to drop $2k+ on memory to even get the full 8 channel config here. If you need lots of memory bandwidth, that kinda throws the value proposition out the window, and you’re in 2P price range territory anyway.

      • dragontamer5788
      • 1 year ago

      [quote<]Also, you have to drop $2k+ on memory to even get the full 8 channel config here. If you need lots of memory bandwidth, that kinda throws the value proposition out the window, and you're in 2P price range territory anyway.[/quote<] Ehhhh? Does the $2000+ spent on the 2nd CPU suddenly stop being $2000 just because you've got a sunk-cost of $6000 on the rest of the system? Cutting the costs of a system from $8000 to $6000 is still saving $2000 all the same. Or do you think that money magically loses value because you're spending money elsewhere?

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 1 year ago

        he’s a moose, not an accountant. moose aren’t known for being the smartest.

          • brucethemoose
          • 1 year ago

          Mooses are quite intelligent, just bad at math sometimes.

            • dragontamer5788
            • 1 year ago

            I phrased it like that because its a common money fallacy.

            There’s that, there’s [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decoy_effect<]decoy pricing[/url<], there's the gambler's fallacy. Sunk-cost fallacy is a big one. The more people know about human thinking-fails, the more we can work to ignore our mistakes and focus on more rational behavior.

            • brucethemoose
            • 1 year ago

            Indeed.

            I fell into that fallacy, but I was also pointing out that the high end end memory configs have quite a premium, and the low end configs are only quad-channel. You’d be better off buying the default config and throwing the sticks away, or adding to the second tier config.

    • dragontamer5788
    • 1 year ago

    The 7401P is probably the price/performance king for this configuration. 24-cores / 48-threads. But the EPYC systems favor productivity far more than gaming. 7401P is clocked at 2GHz and “Turbos” to 3GHz. Furthermore, you have 4-NUMA Nodes, and far more CCX issues.

    Threadripper 1950x is 16-cores clocked at 3.4GHz base 4GHz turbo.

    EPYC will win if you need the 8-channel memory and extra cores for 3d rendering or something crazy. Otherwise, Threadripper 1950x (which already exacerbates the CCX issue) is probably the highest a typical user will want to go for.

      • caconym
      • 1 year ago

      I could see a few of these being deployed for extremely heavy smoke/liquid simulations at VFX shops. I also know of a few places using ThreadRippers for the same kind of workload. Seems AMD has finally gotten its claws back into VFX and animation, if only tentatively at this point.

    • JosiahBradley
    • 1 year ago

    Velocity Micro hails from my hometown! I feel like I need to purchase something just to support the old stomping ground.

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