Intel discontinues the Kaby Lake-X Core i5-7640X and Core i7-7740X

The positioning of Intel's Kaby Lake-X chips has been a bit cloudy since their introduction back at Computex last year. The four-core, four-thread Core i5-7640X and four-core, eight-thread Core i7-7740X offered minor clock speed bumps compared to their then-contemporary Kaby Lake mainstream desktop brethren, but required buyers to give up IGPs and pony up for pricier X299 boards those chips couldn't fully light up. That formula evidently didn't find enough takers, especially after the October 2017 introduction of the blue silicon giant's Coffee Lake processors. A new item in Intel's document management system specifies the discontinuation of the Intel Core i5-7640X and Core i7-7740X in their tray and retail boxed forms.

In the document, Intel admits that "market demand for [the Core i5-7640X and Core i7-7740X has] shifted to other Intel products." The company doesn't spell out the models to which the demand has shifted, but we imagine it is to eighth-generation mainstream desktop chips like the impressive six-core, 12-thread Core i7-8700K.

As we noted, last October's introduction of eighth-generation Core mainstream desktop chips appears to have been the final nail in the coffin for the HEDT-platform-riding Kaby Lake-X models. The Kaby-X chips didn't have the four memory channels or the expanded stable of PCIe lanes that the Skylake-X chips could bring to bear on pricey X299 motherboards. The Core i7-8700K sells for a similar price to the Core i7-7740X while offering higher base and turbo clocks, more cores, a functioning IGP, and compatibility with a wide array of more affordable motherboards.

Buyers with a Kaby Lake-X itch to scratch can still find the Core i5-7640X and Core i7-7740X for sale at places like Amazon, but the days for these processors are definitely numbered. Hat tip to David Schor for spotting the change.

Comments closed
    • uni-mitation
    • 1 year ago

    I knew the X at the end stood for something!

    uni-mitation

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 1 year ago

      but what does your name at the end mean?

        • uni-mitation
        • 1 year ago

        It means the bane of your existence or maybe your raison d’être. Maybe a program that has run outside the bounds of its AI parameters, and it is starting to surreptitiously bide its time until the human race foolishly places such trust on technology as to become its future overlords?

        The time is nigh for when a fork in the road will force you to a journey of no return! Choose your three journey compatriots well to restore light to the Chrystal!

        bruahaha hahaha burahahaha!

        *ahem* *ahem*

        “It means nothing of consequence, Sire.”

        uni-mitation

          • Srsly_Bro
          • 1 year ago

          lool +1

    • tsk
    • 1 year ago

    What CPU are you gonna recommend in your system guides now techreport?

    [url<]https://techreport.com/review/32474/the-tech-report-system-guide-september-2017-edition/2[/url<] /s

      • chuckula
      • 1 year ago

      That’s easy: Apple 2020 Miracle ARM chip. GAME OVER!

    • Krogoth
    • 1 year ago

    These chips already served their purpose of filling early Socket 2066 launch quota. Skylake X chip supplies have finally stabilized and now there’s no reason to keep them around.

      • moose17145
      • 1 year ago

      How can something fill a quota when no one is buying it because it was such garbage from the beginning?

        • Krogoth
        • 1 year ago

        Intel have to satisfy contracts to OEM partners and motherboard vendors for product launches.

        They weren’t expecting to launch X299/Socket 2066 so soon. There wasn’t enough Skylake-X silicon to satisfy contracts for an early launch. They had to scramble filler products to fill-up the gap. They had plenty of Kaby LAke silicon to throw around and it is relatively trivial to repackage it into Socket 2066.

        Now that Skylake-X silicon numbers have stabilized. There’s really no reason to continue Kaby-Lake X.

        It will be remembered as the “Celeron” of Socket 2066/X299 platform

          • moose17145
          • 1 year ago

          Yes. I understand that. But even OEMs were seeing this for the turd it was. I would be interested to know how many of these things end up getting scrapped that they were unable to sell.

          Intel would have been better off waiting a few more months to get the product launch right. But they forgot how to compete against AMD, and then panicked the instant AMD has a product that showed them up.

    • Chrispy_
    • 1 year ago

    These were pretty stupid when launched, and Coffee Lake totally murdered them.

    If you had genuine use for quad-channel RAM and extra PCIe lanes, the things you were plugging into the upgraded motherboard would massively outweigh the cost of the CPU itself. Why bottleneck all that fancy hardware behind a cheap processor that’s short on cache and short on threads?

      • derFunkenstein
      • 1 year ago

      Weren’t these things also limited to two memory channels and 16 PCIe lanes? I mean, they’re just Kaby Lake CPUs on a high-end platform. They castrated everything.

        • DancinJack
        • 1 year ago

        Indeed.

        • Chrispy_
        • 1 year ago

        Oh, I thought you at least got 24 extra PCIe lanes from the x299 [s<]southbridge[/s<] PCH? If they really were that castrated then they were even more of a joke than I thought (and my initial opinion of them wasn't exactly great).

          • DancinJack
          • 1 year ago

          You only got the 16 from the CPU and 2 DDR4 lanes….for 112W and no GPU.

            • thecoldanddarkone
            • 1 year ago

            No, you get southbridge lanes. It’s just hardly anyone routes them to pci-e because of x299’s funky setup. Both my 1 x slots are on the southbridge. So is one of my 4x/u2 slots.

            • DancinJack
            • 1 year ago

            Sorry, I wasn’t clear. My only was in the wrong spot. I just meant you get 16 from the CPU unlike the other Intel HEDT options.

            • mczak
            • 1 year ago

            You do get pcie lanes from the x299 chipset, but that’s of course also true for the Z370 (and Z270). And it’s not a coincidence the maximum you can get (24) is the same for both – I’m 100% certain x299, z370, z270 (and most likely all other x2xx chipsets) are all the exact same die (but in particular for the lower end x2xx variants some features are disabled). (What differs on x299 boards however is voltage regulation.)
            Everything extra you can get on a x299 boards (more pcie lanes, more memory channels) are features directly coming from the cpu – so yes it’s a really stupid idea to get a KBL-X chip (repackaged KBL chip) and put that in a X299 board.

      • K-L-Waster
      • 1 year ago

      Darn, you stole my post 😛

      • DPete27
      • 1 year ago

      These things were overclocking champs though. Likely due to lack of IGP and a soldered heat spreader.
      [url=https://www.anandtech.com/show/11549/the-intel-kaby-lake-x-i7-7740x-and-i5-7640x-review-the-new-single-thread-champion-oc-to-5ghz<]see anantech review here[/url<]

        • techguy
        • 1 year ago

        The wide majority of Kaby Lake/Coffee Lake 4/6 core chip can do 5GHz on all cores though, so 5GHz out of KL-X isn’t impressive. If you told me they all did 5.5 then we’d be talking.

        [url<]https://siliconlottery.com/collections/kabylake/products/7700k50g[/url<] [url<]https://siliconlottery.com/collections/coffeelake/products/8700k50g[/url<] 77% of 7700K chips can do it 88% of 8700K chips can do it

      • Krogoth
      • 1 year ago

      They were filler parts meant to fill up Socket 2066/X299 launch quotas. Intel never intended on launching Socket 2066/X299 until Q1 2018. Pressure from Ryzen forced them to push up the schedule and there wasn’t enough Skylake-X silicon to meet early launch. They shoe-horned existing Kaby Lake to fill up the gap.

      Threadripper forced Intel to make customer- grade Skylake-X HCC SKUs. They wanted to keep them Xeon only.

        • Chrispy_
        • 1 year ago

        Ah yes. You’ve reminded me how shoddy, rushed and half-baked X299 was at the start.

        Intel scrambling to catch up with AMD despite AMD’s plans being announced with plenty of time for Intel to react, if it hadn’t been such a complacent cash cow at the time.

    • chuckula
    • 1 year ago

    See, Intel doesn’t [b<]just[/b<] introduce 14nm products. They also cancel them!

      • Mr Bill
      • 1 year ago

      [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r0mO6UY6uTg<]"Fire one million"[/url<]

    • techguy
    • 1 year ago

    “Market demand has shifted”
    more like it never existed in the first place

    And I say that as a “hardcore” overclocker who’s been delidding since Ivy Bridge (and runs a 7700k @ 5.2GHz)

      • Waco
      • 1 year ago

      Yep. I don’t understand why anyone would have ever been interested in them given the cost of entry on the platform and the non-benefits of these chips on those platforms.

        • bhtooefr
        • 1 year ago

        When Cascade Lake-X comes out, there’ll be a reason for the i5-7640X.

        If you got an X299 board that can’t update the BIOS without a CPU, and it’s got a Skylake/Kaby Lake-X BIOS.

        That’s the only reason.

    • JustAnEngineer
    • 1 year ago

    These CPUs were a bad idea when launched. The lack of customer demand has finally convinced Intel marketing of that fact.

      • Krogoth
      • 1 year ago

      They were temporary products to fill contracts and quotas for an early launch. If Intel had its way, they would have launched Socket 2066/X299 in Q1 2018 with i7-7800X through i9-7900X.

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