Nokia 6.1 handset sits neatly in the middle row

Flagship Android phones are great for a lot of people, but some folks don't like the recent trends towards rising prices, disappearing headphone jacks, overstuffed software packages, and iffy update policies. Nokia hopes its freshened mid-range 6.1 handset can find some buyers in the United States with its middle-ground asking price, stock Android experience, and two years of software upgrades.

Buyers will get an eight-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 630 instead of the flagship-bound Snapdragon 845. The SoC is paired with a generous 4 GB of LPDDR4 memory and 32 GB of storage space. That's an extra gigabyte of RAM compared to the Nokia 6 the rest of the world got last month. Users can expand storage by up to 128 GB by adding a microSD card.

The 5.5″ IPS screen's 1920×1080 resolution, 16:9 aspect ratio, and noticeable bezels aren't going to attract attention in a crowd, but the display nonetheless offers sufficient size and clarity to get things done. A layer of Corning's Gorilla Glass sits atop the screen for enhanced durability.

The integrated battery has a capacity of 3000 mAh, and Nokia says it can go from completely dead to 50% charge in half an hour. All those electrons jump on board through the USB Type-C connector on the bottom of the phone. The other end of the handset has the headphone jack prized by those unwilling or unable to carry around an adapter dongle. 

The front of the phone has an eight-megapixel camera above the screen. The aluminum back has a a single Zeiss-branded 16-MP snapper and a fingerprint reader. A tragically-named “Bothie” feature lets users capture photos and video from the front and rear cameras simultaneously.

Maybe Nokia added the “.1” name to really drive home the handset's membership in the Android One program. Android One phones are guaranteed to have two years of operating system updates, including monthly security patches. This policy still doesn't match the support level Apple extends to its iOS devices, but it represents a major improvement compared to what most Android phones usually get. The phone even comes packing Android Oreo from the get-go, so it won't have to play catch-up right from the start.

The Nokia 6.1 will cost $269 unlocked when it goes on sale at Amazon and Best Buy on May 6. Verizon and Sprint customers (and users of MVNOs that sell bandwidth on their networks) shouldn't get too excited, though—the 6.1 doesn't support CDMA networks.

Comments closed
    • Firestarter
    • 2 years ago

    I won’t be needing a phone for a while but if anyone comes asking, I’d recommend them this phone in a heartbeat. It even has MicroSD storage!

    • chµck
    • 2 years ago

    i have this phone (TA-1045), and it’s great, but for those still looking, i would also consider the samsung A7

    • chµck
    • 2 years ago

    there is no 4/32 model, it’s a typo
    there are only 3/32 and 4/64 models

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 2 years ago

    ultimate-limitation,

    does this work for porn like the LG phone from a few days ago?

    [url<]https://techreport.com/news/33589/lg-wants-you-to-thinq-about-its-latest-g7-smartphone?post=1077131[/url<]

      • uni-mitation
      • 2 years ago

      [quote=”article above”<]The 5.5" IPS screen's 1920x1080 resolution, 16:9 aspect ratio, and noticeable bezels aren't going to attract attention in a crowd, but the display nonetheless offers sufficient size and clarity to get things done. A layer of Corning's Gorilla Glass sits atop the screen for enhanced durability.[/quote<] If you are going for the Porno Incognito approach then this one shines. The LG phone is for the Brazzers Crowd that likes to show off their disposable income and grab eye-balls. uni-mitation

    • Ryhadar
    • 2 years ago

    Been pretty happy with my Moto g5 plus, but I’d probably get this if it died unexpectedly. Nice looking phone, Nokia.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 2 years ago

      I just got the Moto G5+ last week. I got it over the larger G5s+ and my previous phone was the awful and slow G2.

      I got the 4GB/64GB version.

    • uni-mitation
    • 2 years ago

    [quote=”article above”<]Flagship Android phones are great for a lot of people, but some folks don't like the recent trends towards rising prices, disappearing headphone jacks, overstuffed software packages, and iffy update policies. [/quote<] Monkey see, monkey do. uni-mitation

    • uni-mitation
    • 2 years ago

    DUPLICATE

    • uni-mitation
    • 2 years ago

    DUPLICATE

    • Kretschmer
    • 2 years ago

    If the camera is pretty good on this and I wasn’t on a CDMA network, this sort of negates any reason to buy a Pixel 2 like my current phone.
    (Good Enough Performance) + (Stock Android) + (3.5mm Jack) = What I’m looking for.

      • chµck
      • 2 years ago

      The camera is exceedingly mid-range.
      16MP, 1.0um pixels, no OIS, f/2.0.
      Acceptable for day-to-day, but bring your real camera for important events.

    • RAGEPRO
    • 2 years ago

    “Huh, these look really ni―[quote<]the 6.1 doesn't support CDMA networks.[/quote<]Sigh."

      • DancinJack
      • 2 years ago

      Similar to the old Nokia days. I wanted some of those old Symbian phones so bad but VERIZON because I cared about coverage and reliability.

      • Clint Torres
      • 2 years ago

      And then they wonder why their phones aren’t selling that well.

      • BorgOvermind
      • 2 years ago

      Great. Looks average, is average and does not even work as a phone, which it suppose to be the primary function of these bricks.

      • highlandr
      • 2 years ago

      Tell me about it. To get a phone that gets service where I work, I either get to buy a flagship, a Motorola, or a cheap piece of crap. Motorla’s the only middle ground left that supports CDMA.

      If Nokia/HMD had put CDMA in ANY of their models, I would have bought at least 2 by now.

      • TheRazorsEdge
      • 2 years ago

      CDMA is quickly becoming irrelevant. It is basically obsolete in large metro areas.

      I never fell back to CDMA unless I was traveling somewhere rural, and that was years ago before the Verizon supercookie fiasco.

      This might be more of an issue for Sprint customers, since they were last to the LTE party (at least for widescale deployment).

        • derFunkenstein
        • 2 years ago

        Driving through northern Missouri I always fall off the Verizon network and roam at 1X. It’s a pain, but at least I could make a phone call.

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